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Full text of "Coast Seamen's Journal (Sept.21,1910-Sept.13,1911)"

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INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-FOUR. 

SEPTEMBER 21, 1910— SEPTEMBER 13, 1911. 



Title 



No. Page 



Abanddiied in Good Condition 45 

Aliolition of Overtime 15 

Abraham Lincoln, Memorial to 15 

Accidents, Railway, in Britain 21 

Accidents in Coal Mining 22 

Advertising, Lynch on 7 

Affinity, Case of 40 

African Lines, Wireless on 13 

Africa, East, Steamships for 14 

Africa, South, Wages in 17 

A. F. of L. — Convention ProceedingSj Etc. — 

Convention Call 1 

Gompers and the Federation 9 

Convention Proceedings 12 

A. F. of L. and the Seamen 12 

Ruck's Settlement, The 25 

A. F. of L. News Letter 31-52 (incl. 

Supreme Court Decision in P)Uck Case 35 

Contempt Decision Abortive 36 

Sentences Set Aside Zl 

Contempt Case .'\gain 43 

Judgment is Forecasted 47 

Alaska. Gold Shipped From 9 

Alaska. Vessels Wrecked in 19 

Alloy, Discovery of New 15 

Alpine Barrier Crossed 2 

-Alsop Claims Decided 13 

Alsop Claim, Award in 44 

Alsop Claim 48 

America. Peonage in 48 

American Tools. Tribute to 8 

American Shipbuilding, Year's 47 

Annnid~en and South Pole 42 

Antwerp. Shipping at 30 

Anti-Trust Law in Practice 21 

.Appeal for Los Angeles 14 

Acjuitania, Largest Ship 46 

Arbitration, Newfoundland Fisheries.... 2 

Arbitration, Compulsory, Etc. — 

Shall Labor Be Free Or Slave? 23 

Protest. And Do It Now ! 23 

Anti-Strike Bill Beaten (Cal. Leg.)... 25 

Canadian Disputes .Act 27 

Two Views of Arbitration 34 

.Australians Defend Strike 42 

.Argentina. Labor in 15 

Arizona-New Mexico, Statehood Resolu- 
tion Signed SO 

Armies, Cost of Maintenance 17 

Asia Minor. Wages in 4 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union — 

Atlantic Notes (By Charles Sheraton") 

18-7; 20-3; 21-3; 23-3; 24-3; 

ional Mass-Meeting 23 

ipmen Take Note! 29 

n! 29 



Tnternat 
Steam "^h 
Attentio 
Consul ; 
.Atlantic 
Seamen 
Victory 
.Atlantic 
.Austr.ilia. 
Australia, 
Australia. 
Australia, 
Australia, 
erto") . 
Australian 
Australian 
Australian 
Australian 
Australian 



uid Crimp in New York 33 

Lfnions Moving 37 

Doing Things 40 

for Seamen 41 

Seamen's .Agreements 52 

Radium in 5 

Old Age Pension in 8 

Pensions in 12 

Railways in 17 

Six Weeks in (By "El Tu- 

: 50 

Navigation Bill (Seamen) ... .7-15 

Capital, The 11 

Officers' Wages 20 

Notes 27 

Smoke Consumer 44 



11 

15 

13 

10 

2 

2 

7 

11 

10 

8 



1 
6 
3 

); 3 

6 

6 

3 

3 

3 

13 

5 

11 

12 

13 

12 

15 

3 

3 

11 

10 

2 

6 

11 

14 

15 



1 
6 
6 
11 
6 
6 

y 

12 
4 
3 



27-3 
3 
6 

7 
1 
6 
6 
6 
2 
3 
10 
10 
3 

2 
8-4 
3 
11 
3 
2 



Title No. Page 

Australia's Great Railway 11 10 

.Austria, Trade-L'nions in 9 10 

Aviation, Passenger-Carrying Record.... 21 14 

.Aviation Record for Height 49 12 

Aviators Killed 17 13 

Aviators Fh' Across Channel 43 15 

B 

Rack-to-Back Houses, Deaths in 7 10 

Bacteria, Luminous Ocean 11 11 

Rakers. Wages of English 13 10 

Rakery Workers 49 11 

Rarges, Three, Seventeen Lives 19 3 

Rarometer, Inventor of 20 2 

Beer Sold in United States 44 12 

Rolgium Whirlpool 7 7 

Beriberi, Prevention of 9-3; 15-8 

Birds' Nests Industry 4 11 

Births and Deaths in France 8 15 

Blacklist in Denmark 33 10 

Boat Found, Roman 41 11 

Bottle, Long Voyage of a 9 10 

Boycott, Principles of 9 1 

Bravery Commended 37 14 

Bravery at Sea, Recognition of 43 14 

Brazilian Mutineers. Death of 17-4; 18-4 

Brazilian Mutiny, The 11-6; 11-15 

Bread, Shall Trust Control? 51 11 

Breakwater at San Pedro 2 5 

Breakwater. The Largest 29 9 

Bridges of New York City . 40 10 

Britain, Railway .Accidents in 21 10 

British Industry, Oldest 1 10 

British Parcels Post 1 11 

Rritish Postoffice ,, 2 11 

Rritish Merchant Marine 4 10 

Rritish Columbian Furs 8 11 

British Trade-Union Congress 10 2 

British Trade-Unions 29 11 

Rritish Crowning, The 43 11 

Rritish Ships. Orientals on 49 7 

British Seamen's Strike — 

Rranded! 2 6 

Get Ready for the Fight! 10 11 

International Strike, The 19 6 

"International Stoppage" 24 7 

International Stoppage, The 30 1 

Seamen's Proposals 33 6 

International Committee of Seafarers' 

Unions (Illustration) 'i'^ 1 

International Committee. The 37 6 

Seamen's Right to Quit 39 7 

Seamen Doing Things 40 6 

Purpose of Seamen's Strike 42 1 

Seamen Still Gaining 42 6 

Seamen Win Complete Victory 43 6 

Great Seamen's Strike, The 46 1 

'Twas a Glorious Victory! 46 6 

Two of a Kind 47 6 

England's Dependence 48 11 

Loyalty Rewarded 49 6 

Coast Seamen's Journal Supplement... 49 — 

What the Seamen Started 49 7 

Rritish Seamen on Top 52 6 

Rudget of New York 7 13 

Buenos Aires, Modern 3 10 

Ruenos Aires, Skyscraper in 8 10 

C 

California State Federation of Labor 

Convention 4-14; 5-1 

California Labor History (Review) 14 1 

California, Recall in 38 1 

California. Tuberculosis in 49 12 

"Call the Watch" (Poem, by "Star Key") 4 9 

Call for Action, A 8 11 



Title No. Page 

Campaign. Issue of the 7 6 

Canadian Navy, First Ship of the 7 12 

Canadian Navy, First Ship on Pacific 

Coast 9 5 

Canton, Modernization of 4 3 

Cape to Cairo Railway 19 3 

Capital, The .Australian 11 3 

Cargo Traffic via St. John 17 5 

Case of Affinity 40 7 

Cathedral in Chile 11 2 

Catholics, Number in United States 24 13 

Charity in New York City 18 13 

"Cheap-Labor" Problem, The 30 6 

Chicago, Budget of 22 13 

Child-Labor in Europe 17 1 

Chile, Cathedral in 11 2 

China, First Parliament in 8 15 

China, Shipping in 28 3 

Chinese, Proportion of .Attending School 23 14 

Chinese, Shipmaster on 28 7 

Christianity, Spread of 6 2 

Christmas Tragedy, A (By "El Tuerto") 14 2 

Church, A "Practical" 1 2 

Cigarmakers in Hongkong 13 11 

Cigarmakers Win Case 19 2 

Cigarmakers, Tampa, Help 22 2 

Cities of Over 100,000 12 13 

Cities May Not Favor Unions 18 9 

Citizens in the Navy 17 10 

Citizenship, .Seamen and 28 10 

Clergymen, Pay of 2 10 

Clipper Ship Era, The 22 11 

Closed, No Shop Is 42 11 

Clyde, Shipbuilding on the 7-11; 12-11 

Coal, Production of in United States.... 18 13 

Coal-Mine Explosions 4 3 

Coal Mining, Accidents in 22 2 

Coast, Future of the 19 10 

Coast Seamen's Journal — 

Volume XIV 1 6 

From a Contemporary 3 7 

Great Lakes Strike (Special Edition) . . 26 — 

Great Seamen's Strike (Supplement ) . . 49 — 

Comrade, From An Old (By Carl Dreyer) 52 7 

Conciliation Scheme, Railway 7 3 

Conciliation Wins Again (San Francisco 

Iron Trades) 18 6 

Cocoanuts, Pearls From 9 7 

Collective Labor .Agreements 30 10 

Colorado, Women Elected in 31 13 

Coming Our Way 31 6 

Commerce, Protection to 13 3 

Conditions That Concern Labor 3 1 

Congress, Democrats in 9 13 

Congress at Sea, A 10 7 

Congress, Labor Members of 31 3 

Conscripts, The 48 11 

Constitutional .Amendments (Cal.) 48 7 

Consul and Crimp in New York 2>7t 1 

Consumption of Liquors 3 3 

Contented Ship, Most 45 11 

Convicts, The Labor of 30 2 

Coolie Labor in Trinidad 3 2 

Co-operative Stores, Scotch 2 11 

Co-operative Insurance 4 10 

Copper Production in 1910 40 10 

Corporations, Income of 13 13 

Correction, A (First Steamer at San 

Francisco) 29 3 

Cost of Production 41 10 

Cotton Mill Wages 17 9 

Court Decisions, Maritime, Labor, Etc. — 

Seaman, Disappearance of 1 3 

Widow Denied Damages 1 3 

Seaman Entitled to Treatment 6 7 



COAST SEA.MEX-S JorRXAI. INDEX— VOLUME TWEXTY-FOUR. 



Title 



Xo. Page 



RiRht to Wages 13 

Sailor Not Laborer 22 

Seaman Xot a Laborer 22 

Officers on Motor Vessels 22 

When Are Wages Payable? 23 

Deserting Chinese Seamen 29 

Mercliant Seaman Contracts 30 

Seamen Win Wage Claims 34 

Furuseth vs. Pacific Mail Co 34 

Seaman Awarded Damages 34 

Injury to Seaman 34 

Trade-Union Acts 35 

Wages. Claim for Dismissed 39 

Funds for Political Purposes 40 

Accident to Seaman 41 

Salvage Awarded (Atlas- Edward R. 

West) 48 

Create Crime by Law, To 27 

Criminal Cases, Celebrated ^7 

Criminal Code, New 17 

Crush the Octopus 31 

Crusoe l)y Choice, A 43 

Crowning. The British 43 

Cuba, Labor Legislation in 29 

D 

Dangers Xear San Francisco 

Danish Seamen's .Agreements 

Dead .Sea, Swimming in 

Death Rate, Lowest 

De;iths. Infant, in Germany 

Deaths in Rack-to-Back Houses 

Deaths nn i-'ourth of July 

Dcckload. Biggest 

"Declaration of London" 

Demand Union Shop Card 

Democracy and Socialism 

Democrats Carry Maine 

Democrats in C<jngress 

Denmark, Blacklist in 

Departmental Coercion 

Destitution, Millions for 

Detroit River Traffic 

Diaz, I'orfirio, Resigns 

Discovery of Xevv .Alloy 

Disputes, Textile Trade 

Di\ing l-'eat 

Dream of the Golden Gate (Poem by 

Robert Duncan Milne) 14 

Drv Dock, Largest in World 12 



F.ducatioii in Iceland 9 

Fducation for Printers 43 

FJght-Hour Day, The 44 

Eight-Hour Law, Women's 

34-2; 37-6; 40-6; 44-2; 

Emigration, Russian 4 

iMnigration From India 12 

Emigration, German 24 

Employes on Canal 4 

Employes, German 15 

England and Suez Canal 3 

Engines, Oil. for Ships 49 

England, Shipbuilding in 49 

FInglish. Con(|uest for 1 

English Silk Mills. Wages in 12 

English Bakers, Wages of 13 

Enterprising Union (I. T. U.), An 15 

Euphrates to be Dammed 29 

E!urope. Child-Labor in 17 

E.xplosions, Coal-Mine ^„ 4 



Factory Supervision IS 

Factory and Death-Rate 25 

Facts .\bout London 25 

Facts on Ship Subsidy 28 

Failures in 1910. 23 

Farmers and Immigration 10 

Farmers. Women, in Scotland 20 

Fastest Railroad Work 12 

Federation for Glove- Workers 5 

Fifty Years Ago 18 

Fisheries — 



47 

42 

45 

15 

3 

7 

44 

11 

19 

19 

51 

1 

9 

33 

31 

19 

48 

37 

15 

3 

15 



7 
3 
6 
6 
11 
2 
11 
2 
5 

10 

10 

2 

5 

10 
10 

7 

6 
10 

8 
11 

2 
11 
11 



10 

2 

11 

11 

3 

10 

12 

5 

14 

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6 

13 
13 
10 

3 
10 

9 
12 
11 
11 

5 

2 
12 



3 
11 

11 

45-6 
10 
2 
11 
14 
11 
7 

10 

11 

10 

10 

10 

3 

3 

1 

3 



3 

10 
10 

2 

iT 

6 

11 

3 

6 

10 



Sockeye Pack in Columbia River 

Codfish Pack 

Codfish, Catch of 

Whaling Catch 

Seal Catch 

Whaling in South .Atlantic 

Cannery Losses 

Whaling Catch 

Whaling Catch 

Motor Fishing Boats 

Whaling Catch 

British Columbia Fisheries 

Halibut Roe for Bait 

Salmon Pack, .Alaska — B. C. — Pnget 
Sound 

Salmon Fishing at Sea 

Salmon in British Columbia 

Irish Fisheries 

Compensation of Fishermen 

Ceylon's Pearl Fisheries 

British Columbia Salmon Pack 

Irish Fisheries. Importance of 

Canadian Fisheries 

Value of Fisheries in California 

Oil for Fishing Boats 

German Pearl Fisheries 

.Alaska Fisheries. Total Output of 

Columbia River Pack 

Finland, Elections in 

Fire. Loss of Life and Property by in 

United States '. . . . 



5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
11 
5 
5 
5 
2 
5 
3 
2 

5 
3 
8 
9 

10 
2 
3 

11 

11 
5 

10 
7 
5 
5 



1 
1 

2 

2 

3 

3 

4 

5 

8 

9 

9 
10 
12 

15 
17 
17 
17 
23 
25 
28 
28 
30 
31 
31 
34 
35 
50 

19 14 
38 13 



Title ■ No. Page 

First Recorded Strike 48 10 

Forecastles. For Better 41 6 

Fourth of July, Deaths on . . 44 12 

l-Vance .Adopts Greenwich Time 8 IS 

France, Births and Deaths in 8 15 

France, Woman Suffrage in 9 10 

hVance, Greenwich Time .Adopted by 16 4 

France, Trade-Unions in 33 2 

France .Adopts Greenwich Time 27 14 

F"ree Press. Warren and 20 6 

I'Vench Xegro Village 8 6 

Fruit Picking in Vacation 34 11 

I-'urs. British Columbian 8 11 

Fuel of Future. Oil 13 3 

Future of the Coast 19 10 

G 

German Budget 9 15 

German Cities. Growth of 24 11 

German Emigration 24 11 

German Employes 15 11 

German Seamen's .Ages 35 7 

Germany. Infant Deaths in 3 3 

Germany, Insurance in 4 2 

Germany. Trade-Unions in 10 2 

Germany, Immigration Into 17 10 

Germany, Population of 25 14 

Germany. Temperance in 28 11 

Getting In a Final Blow 30 11 

Giant Liners Building 1 3 

Gill, Mayor of Seattle. Recalled 23 13 

Glove-Workers. Federation for 5 6 

Glove-Workers, Help the 7 3 

Gold. Platinum and 9 2 

Gold Shipped I'rom Alaska 9 13 

Golden Gate, .Amateurs Swim 46 5 

Golden Gate. Women Swim 50 5 

Gompers and the Negro 14 6 

Gompers on Labor Day 50 6 

Good Official Removed 37 7 

Government, Unrepresentative 9 6 

Governor's Potent Words 24 6 

Graft Charges San Francisco Dropped.. 50 12 

Great l.ife-Saver, A 22 10 

Great Skipper. .A (Cap. "Charlie" Barr) . . 22 3 

Greenwich Time .Adopted by France .. .8-15; 16-4 

Growth of Population 31 11 

Gunnery in Xavy 37 14 

Gyroscope. Future of 8 3 

H 

Hadley on T-abor 11 1 

Hamburg, Port of 21 10 

Harlan Hits Hard. . 36 6 

Hatters' Case, Decision Reversed 31-15; 

.32-3: 33-8; 34-1 

Height of Mount Rainier 6 10 

Height of Waves 25 5 

Hero Fund. .Awards From 12 15 

High Wage.s — Short Hours 45 7 

Holiday Rain Insurance 3 10 

Holland. Trade-Unions in 34 10 

Hongkong. Cigarmakers in 13 11 

Honolulu Jottings (By F. H. Buryeson). 24 2 

Hoodling on Ocean Steamships 10 10 

House of Common' 16 4 

House of Representatives, New .Appor- 
tionment 17-13; 48-12 

I 

Iceland, ICducition in 9 3 

Iceland. Woman Suffrage in 34 12 

Ideas, New, in Ships 33 10 

Immigrants to United States, 1910 19 13 

Immigration to United States, Hindoo... 3 14 

Immigration. Restriction of 8 11 

Inimi,gration. Population and 9 3 

Immigration, Farmers and 10 6 

Immigration Into Germany 17 10 

Immigration — Up to Congress 21 1 

Importing a Population 4 11 

Income Tax .Amendment 33 13 

Income Tax, States .Approving 46 12 

Increase of Sobriety 13 11 

"In Defense of Labor'' 39 6 

India. Emigration I'rom 12 2 

India Is Governed. How 23 10 

India, Deaths From Plague in 45 15 

Industrial Organization (By O. Wahren- 

berg) 36 10 

Industrial Organization (By Ch. J. T. 

G. Sorensen) 38 10 

Initiative and Referendum Z2 11 

Injunction, Government By, Etc. — 

Picketing Enjoined 1 6 

Status of Injunction Suits 10 1 

Injunctions, Taft on 19 11 

Iniunctions 20 2 

Injunction Issue in California 27 1 

Injunction Bill Held Up 28 6 

.Another Injunction Spasm 40 3 

Loewe Injunction, The 47 6 

Des Moines Injunction. The 49 6 

Furuseth on Injunction SO 1 

Hoar on Contempt Trials 51 2 

Insurance. Holiday Rain 3 10 

Insurance in Germany 4 2 

Insurance, Co-operative 4 10 

Insurance, .Accident in Norway 5 11 

International Seamen's Union of America — 

.Seamen's Conference, Report on (By 

.Andrew Furuseth) - 1 

Seamen's Convention Call 8 6 

Seamen's Bill in Congress 10 6 



Title No. Page 

Seamen, .A. F. of L. and the 12 6 

Seamen's Convention. The 15 1 

Seamen's Convention, The 16 1 

Work of the Convention 16 6 

International .Assessment 22 7 

Assessment Carried 32 6 

International .Assessment 23-7; 24-7: 25-7 

Convention City, To Change 44 6 

"In the Toils" 29 6 

Insurance -Against Unemploj'ment, (Brit- 
ish Bill) .^5 4 

Inventor of Barometer 20 2 

Inventor, .A Puzzled 22 7 

Investigating Salt Lake 11 11 

Iron Trades Dispute (San Francisco)... 9 14 

Iroc|Uois. Master of .Acquitted 39 5 

Italians in New York 22 11 

Italians and Subsidies 35 7 

Italy. Tr.ide-Unions in 30 10 

J-K 

Japan on the Ocean 6 3 

Japan, Women in 29 11 

Japanese Polar Research 19 11 

Japanese and Chinese Exclusion — 

.Asiatic Exchision. For 4 6 

Chinese, How the, Came 4 11 

White Man's Country, .A 5 3 

Mackenzie Report. The 17 2 

Harvesting I'ruit Crops 17 2 

California and the Japs 20 6 

Lascar Question, The 22 1 

Trc.ity With Japan, The 23 6 

Jap Question .Again "Settled" 24 6 

We Stand Corrected 27 7 

Japanese Question. The 27 10 

Fruit Picking in Vacation 34 11 

Exclusion <i{ .Asiatics 47 2 

Orientals on British Ships 49 7 

Japanese Blight, The 51 2 

"John Orth," Fate of 35 12 

Johnson. Tom L, Death of 32 13 

Judges. Federal, to Increase Salaries of.. 17 13 

Judiciary. Recall of 52 1 

Juvenile Labor Exchanges 6 3 

Kahn on the Recall 39 2 

Kahn Aids Recall 40 7 

King George V, Coronation of , 41 15 

Krupp Steel Works 3 2 

L 

Label, Women Indorse 11 11 

Labor Day, Incident of 1 6 

"Labor Situation" at San Francisco 2 6 

Labor, Conditions That Concern 3 1 

Labor, Coolie in Trinidad 3 2 

Labor Party in Xew Zealand 4 4 

Labor, Members (Congres.s) .Against... 5 7 

Labor's Differences With Marks 6 1 

Labor Exchanges, Juvenile 6 3 

Labor Bills (Cal.), Views on (By Walter 

Macarthur) 6 6 

Labor's Political Opportunity 6-11; 7-1 

Labor Legislation. Russian 10 3 

Labor, Hadley on 11 1 

Labor, Helping Migratory 11 6 

Labor, Taft on 13 6 

Labor History, California (Review) 14 1 

Labor in .Argentina 15 9 

Labor in United Kingdom 17 8 

Labor in Pullman Shops 28 3 

Labor Legislation in Cuba 29 11 

Labor of Convicts, The 30 2 

Labor Agreements. Collective 30 10 

Labor Legislation (Cal.). Report on.... 31 1 

Labor Members of Congress 31 3 

Labor and Legislation 31 6 

Labor, Surplus, Xot Scarcity of 31 6 

Labor Issue in "Clinic," No 35 6 

Labor Bills. Report on (California) 36 11 

Labor, Mexican Mining 38 11 

Labor in Siianish Mines 40 11 

Labor an<l World Peace 43 1 

Labor in Navy Yards 44 11 

Labor Law in Uruguay 45 10 

Labor Day, Gomi)ers on 50 6 

Lakes of Michigan, Strange 6 10 

Lakes, Shipbuilding on 21 8 

Lakes Department — 

Lake Seamen's I-'ight 1 1 

Carferry, Thirty Die on 1 8 

Frazier's Report on Lakes 2 3 

Loss of Life on Lakes 2 8 

Union. The (Longfellow) 3 9 

-Accidents on the Lakes 5 8 

Carferry 18. Sinking of 6 8 

Secretary Olander's Report 7 6 

Progress of the .Strike 7 8 

Lake Situation .Acute 9 8 

Many Wrecks Here 9 8 

Drawing to a Close 10 8 

Commerce on Lakes 10 8 

Federation Supports Seamen 12 8 

Livingstone Denies Story of 13 8 

.Aid for the Lakes 17 6 

Sailors' Union to -Aid Lakes 1^ 7 

Sailors' Union to .Aid Lakes 19 7 

Lake C.irriers' Meeting 21 8 

Rally 'Round the Lakes ^ 22 6 

Lake Seamen's Conference 22 ^' 

Great Lakes Strike (Special Edition of 

Journal) 26-1 to 16 

Strike on the Lakes, The 26 1 

"Welfare Plan" is Hellfare 26 2 



COAST vSEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-FOUR. 



Title No. Page 

.Strike Pledge. Signing tlic 26 3 

Hellfare "Figures" 26 3 

•Old Man of the Sea, The" 26 3 

Scab Officers 26 3 

Answers Wanted! 26 4 

Strike Against "Hellfare" 26 4 

Who Is Carrying the Heaviest Load? 

(Illustration) 26-4, 5 

Manhood, In Defense of 26 & 

"One for All— All For One!".._ 26 6 

Lake Carriers' "Discharge Book" 26 6 

Read— And Think 26 7 

Forfeit Wages 26 7 

Yarn .'\bout the Manager, A 26 7 

Competent (?) Men 26 7 

Johnnie and His Dad 26 8 

Plain Talk 26 8 

Condemn Contemnt Sentence 26 8 

Roy and His Mother, The 26 9 

Xew Move, A 26 9 

Lake Carriers' "Love" 26 10 

Hand Over Your Money 26 10 

With the Union Launch 26 11 

Til Skandinaviske Sjomaand 26 11 

Says Joshua — 26 12 

Launches Used by Unions on Lakes 

(Illustration) 26 12 

An Alle Deutschen Seelente 26 3 

"\Vr Have Just Begun to F'ight!" 27 6 

In the Toils (Illustration) 29 1 

Strike-Breakers Coming In 29 8 

From An Old Member (By Peter 

Bryan) 30 8 

"On With the Dance" 31 8 

The Tempter Exposed (Illustration).. 32 1 
Seamen on the Lakes (By A. Wangc- 

mann) 32 2 

"Rise Up Jack, Let John Sit Down!" 

(;illustration) 32 2 

Price of Slavery, The 32 6 

In Distress at Sea (By Robert White) ,32 8 

Opening of Navigation 33 8 

Steel Trust Methods 34 8 

.Xccidents on the Lakes 35 8 

Lake Carriers' Tool, A (By A. Furu- 

seth) 36 7 

Stav Away From Lakes! 37 1 

"Hellfare" Burial, A 31 8 

Strike-Breaker, To the 31 8 

Don't Be a Quitter! .39 8 

Seamen Doing Things 40 6 

Steamship Merger 40 8 

Baseless Rumor, A 43 R 

.Shipping. Great Decline of 44 8 

Shipowner Talks, A (By Joshua Blunt) 46 8 
Well, Mr. Livingstone? (By Joshua 

Blunt) 47 8 

What Really Happened (By Joshua 

Blunt) 51 8 

Lascars, New Zealand Against 5 6 

Lascar Question, The 13-1 : 22-1 

Language, A World 5 3 

Latest of Its Kind 29 6 

Legislation, Passed and Pending 14 6 

Liability and Compensation 24 11 

Liberty, Personal, Strikes and 47 2 

Life-Boat "Inspection" (By F. H. Bur- 

yeson) 25 2 

Life-Saving Service, New 12 7 

ife-Saving Service 16-6; 16-12 

..ife-Saver, A Great 22 10 

Lif e-Savers, Work of 47 9 

Liquors, Consumption of 3 3 

Licjuor, Decrease in Use of 7 2 

Liverpool, Shipping at 3 11 

Lloyd's Register of Shipping 20 2 

Lockjaw, Conquest of 1 10 

Log to Lusitania, From 21 2 

Log-Rafts on Pacific 40 5 

Log-Raft Adrift 44-5; 45-6 

Log-Raft Adrift, Another 52 6 

London, Public Utilities in 3 11 

London, Transformation of 9 11 

London, Facts About 25 10 

London to Paris, Airship Flight 32 12 

'^ jogest Passage on Coast 49 5 

r' ; Angeles, Appeal for 14 11 

owest Death Rate 15 11 

jw Initiation Fees — High Dues 19 1 

■ isitania. From Log to 21 2 

Lu.xury or Safety? 20 1 

Lynch on .Advertising 7 2 

M 

Maine, Democrats Carry 1 13 

Maine, Raising the 3-5; 5-15 

Maine, Bodies Recovered From 46 14 

Mariners' Church (San Francisco), An- 
nual Dinner 16 6 

Marks, Labor's Differences With 6 1 

McNamara Case — 

Times Explosion, The 3 6 

Explosion (Times), Press on the 3 6 

Labor, .Attitude of 4 6 

Rewards Offered 4 14 

.Appeal for Los Angeles 6 2 

Times Investigation, The 6 6 

Cause of Times Explosion 8 1 

Lynch on Los Angeles 8 6 

Sensation of the Century 32 6 

Labor's Position Clear 33 6 

McNamara Brothers Arrested 33 15 

.Arrested and Kidnaped 34 3 

McNamara Brothers Arraigned 34 15 

Times Bids for Sympathy 35 10 

.A. F. of L. Issues Call for Funds 35 15 



Title No. Page 

Call for Defense Fund 36 1 

Roosevelt's "If" 41 6 

A Statement (By A. F. of L.) 46 3 

Meerschaum, Substitute for 2 10 

Members (Congress) .A^gainst Labor.... 5 7 

Memorial to Abraham Lincoln 15 13 

Merchant Marine, British 4 10 

Merchant Marine, Russian 25 10 

Merchant Marine (United States), Ton- 
nage of 38 14 

Merchant Marine (United States), is 

Second 50 8 

Messina. Rebuilding 3-10; 20-14 

Mexican Steamship Line 10 3 

Mexican ^Mining Labor 38 11 

Mexico, Centennial of 1 12 

Michigan, Strange Lakes of 6 10 

Migratory Labor, Helping 11 6 

Migratory Workers, The (By A. Furu- 

seth and O. A. Tveitmoe) 37 2 

Milan. First Skyscraper in 10 IS 

Millions Sick Yearly 17 11 

Millions for Detection 19 10 

Millions in Pensions 20 10 

Mines. Rescue Work in 14 11 

Mines, Labor in .Spanish 40 11 

Missouri, Prohibition Defeated in 13 13 

Modern Buenos Aires 3 10 

Modernization of Canton 4 3 

Molders. Good Book for 37 10 

Mosquito- Proof .Steamer 10 11 

Motive Power, New 12 3 

Moving Pictures of Strikes 15 9 

"Much Cry, Little Wool" 44 6 

Mutineers, Brazilian, Death of 17 4 

Mutiny, The Brazilian 11 6 

Mvsterv of Ouicksand 10 10 

Mystery of Sleep, The 15 3 

N 

Naturalization Law, Change in 45 2 

Naval Executions (France, Spain) 48 15 

Navigation Bill, Australian 7 IS 

Navy, Canadian, First Ship of the 7 12 

Navy (Canadian) First Ship on Pacific 

Coast 9 5 

Navy. Oil for 12 10 

Navy, U. S., Estimates for 12 12 

Navy, U. S., Health in 13 12 

Navy, U. S., Enlisted Men in 14 12 

Navy Year Book 15 12 

Navy, U. S.. Second 17 10 

Navy, U. S , Citizens in 17 10 

Navy. U. S., Champion Shot of 17 12 

Navy, Gunners in 31 14 

Navy Yards, Labor in 44 11 

Navy Not a Reform School 45 11 

Newfoundland Fisheries .Arbitration.... 2 15 

Negro Village. T-'rench 8 6 

Negro. Gompers and the 14 6 

New York, Budget of 7 13 

New York City, .Assessable Property.... 11 12 

New York City. Charity in 18 13 

New York, Italians in 22 11 

New York City, Health of 22 13 

New York City, Bridges of 40 10 

New Zealand Labor Rejects Socialism ... 2 4 

New Zealand, Labor Party in 4 4 

New Zealand .Against Lascars 5 6 

New Zealand Seamen's .Appeal 8 11 

New Zealand Seamen .Active 17 6 

New Zealand With Us 22 7 

Nobel Prizes. The 22 3 

North Pole, Real 44 2 

No Shop Is Closed .^ . 42 11 

Norway, .Accident Insurance in 5 11 

Norway, Shipping of '. 20 10 

Norway, Woman Suffrage in 30 3 

Norwegian Sardine Exports 10 2 

Norwegian-Hamburg Route 12 3 

Norwegian Comrades, Our 25 6 

Norwegian Proposals 38 6 

O 

Ocean Transportation 3 3 

Ocean, Japan on the 6 3 

Ocean Bacteria, Luminous 11 H 

Oceans, Size of the 19 11 

Octopus. Crush the 31 11 

Ohio, Votes Sold in 18 13 

Oil, Steamship Company Using.... 4 2 

Oil for Navy 12 10 

Oil Fuel of Future 13 3 

Oil Engines for Ships 49 10 

Old-Age Pensions 4 14 

01d-.Age Pensions in Australia 8 10 

Old Story of the Tow-Barge 19 6 

Olympic, Launch of 6 15 

Olvmpic, Maiden Voyage of 41 14 

"Open Shop" City, The 4 1 

"Open Shop" vs. Union Shop 18 1 

Orinoco Claims, Decision on 7 15 

Orientals on British Ships 49 7 

Overtime, .Abolition of 15 15 

I 
P-Q 

Panama Canal, Work on 1 IS 

Panama Canal, Opening Date 11 12 

Panama Canal, Expenditures on 11 12 

Panama Canal, First Vessel to Navigate 12 12 

Panama, Locking Ships at 13 3 

Panama Canal, Appropriations for 19 13 

Panama Canal, Navigation of 20 12 

Panama Canal, Progress of 23 11 

Painters, Protecting House 23 11 

Parcels Post, British 1 11 



Title Xo. Page 

Parliament. First, in China 8 IS 

Pay of Clergymen 2 10 

Peace, Celebration, Scandinavian 4 12 

Peace or War (San Francisco) 13 6 

Peace Congress Universal 42 10 

Peace, Labor and World 43 1 

Pearls From Cocoanuts 9 7 

Peary and North Pole 21 13 

Pensions in Australia 12 10 

Pensions, Millions in 20 10 

Peonage, Convictions for 12 14 

Peonage, No Place for 20 3 

Peonage in America 48 3 

Pepper, Unloading 42 11 

Peru, Two New Ports in 28 11 

Pharaohs, Tombs of the 7 10 

Phase of Trade Education 18 11 

Pitcairn Island, Population of 28 5 

Pitcairn Island 45 10 

Plague, Deaths From in India 45 15 

Platinum and Gold 9 2 

Plutocracy. Socialism and 50 6 

Poachers Killing Seals 19 2 

Polar Research, Japanese 19 11 

Political Parties 29 10 

Politics in Pompeii 11 3 

Pompeii, Politics in 11 3 

Port. World's Greatest 2 11 

Port of Hamburg 21 10 

Population, Importing a 4 11 

Population, Growth of 31 11 

Population of Paris 32 12 

Population and Immigration 9 3 

Population, Ctnter of in LInited States.. 45 12 

Population — 

Aberdeen, Wash 19 13 

Alabama 9 13 

Alaska 15 13 

-Argentina 3 10 

.Arizona 6 13 

.Arkansas 21 13 

Atlantic City, N. J 3 13 

Australia 10-15; 42-15 

Baltimore, Md 2 13 

Bellingiiam, Wash 19 13 

Berlin .39 13 

Boise, Idaho 14 13 

British Empire 8 15 

British India 50 IS 

California 13 13 

Chester, Pa 8 13 

Chicago, 111 1-13; 50-12 

Cleveland, 2 13 

Cohoes, N. Y 4 13 

Connecticut 7 13 

Covington, Ky 1 13 

Dallas, Tex 2 13 

Dayton, 2 13 

Duluth. Minn 13 13 

El Paso, Tex 10 13 

England, Wales and Ireland 31 12 

Everett, Wash 19 13 

Florida 9 13 

Gary, Ind 8 13 

Genoa 50 15 

Germ.'iny 23 14 

Hamburg 43 15 

Hawaiian Islands 21 13 

Hazleton, Pa 8 13 

Honolulu, T. H 14 13 

Illinois 13 13 

Indiana 10 13 

Jamaica 46 15 

Joliet, III 4 13 

Kansas 12 13 

Liverpool, Eng 15 4 

London, Greater 38 12 

Los .Angeles, Cal 9 13 

Louisiana 17 13 

Alaryland 17 13 

Massachusetts 6 13 

]\Iemphis, Tenn 11 12 

Alilan 50 IS 

Minnesota 13 13 

Minneapolis 7 13 

Naples 50 IS 

Nebraska .. 13 13 

New Hampshire 11 12 

New Jersey 16 13 

New Rochelle, N. J 1 13 

New York 12 13 

Xew York, Greater 52 12 

Nome, .Alaska 22 13 

Xorth Dakota 19 13 

Ogden, Utah 15 13 

Ohio 11 12 

Oklahoma 12 13 

Olympia, Wash 19 13 

Oswego, N. Y 1 13 

Paris 32 12 

Pennsylvania 13 13 

Philadelphia, Pa 9 13 

Pitcairn Island 28 S 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y 2 13 

Racine, Wis 4 13 

Russia 44 11 

Salt Lake City, Utah 11 13 

San Francisco 10 13 

Scotland 38 12 

South Africa 49 IS 

South Carolina 21 13 

South Dakota 19 13 

Spokane, Wash 20 13 

Springfield, 111 3 13 

St. Peter.sburg 28 2 

Tacoma, Wash 14 13 

Tampa, Fla 18 13 

Tennessee 14-13; 24-13 



COAST SEAMEXS JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-FOUR. 



Titk No. Page 

Texas 18 13 

Turin 50 15 

United States 20 13 

United States. Center of Population in 

46-12; 51-12 

Utah 17 13 

Walla Walla. Wash 19 13 

Waterloo 3 13 

Watertown. X. Y 3 13 

West Virginia 14 13 

Wilk-esbarrc. Pa 3 13 

W'yoming 15 13 

Populous Country, Third Most 22 11 

Ports. Shipping of Leading 43 7 

Portugal. Revolution in 4 12 

Postal Receipts for Year S 13 

Postal Deficit. Reduction of 1^ 13 

Postal Clerks Organizing 43 10 

Post OtTice. British 2 11 

Post Office IK'partnieiit Challenged 33 3 

Post Office Deficit Removed 39 13 

Post's Futile Fight 7 11 

Post. Cheap Mischief Maker 9 11 

Post's Scheme Fails 12 2 

Pres.s on the Wreck. The 44 1 

Preussen. Wreck of the 13 11 

Prevention of Beriberi 9-3: 15-8 

Preference to Unionists 11 3 

Principles of Boycott 9 1 

Printers. Trade Education for 20-1 1 : 43- 1 1 

Printers. Welcome the 48 6 

Printers' Health 51 10 

"Process of Lav." 12 7 

Production, Cost of 41 10 

Prohibition Defeated in Mississippi 1.3 13 

Profit Sliaring Discontinued 17 9 

Protection to Commerce 13 3 

Public Servants. Rights of 42 2 

Public Utilities in London 3 11 

Pullman Shops, f^abor in 28 3 

Puritan. U. S. X 16 12 

Puzzled Inventor. A 22 7 

Oueue. Taking the 21 2 

Quicksand. Mystery of 10 10 

R 

Race Suicide Problem 21 11 

Radium in Australia 5 3 

Railvvav Conciliation Scheme 7 3 

Railwav. Australia's Great 11 10 

Railroad Work, Fastest 12 3 

Railways in .Australia 17 3 

Railway. Cape to Cairo 19 3 

Railway Accidents in Britain 21 10 

Railway. Xew Transcanadian 33 10 

Rain. Insurance Holiday 3 10 

Rainier. Mount. Height of 6 10 

Real Xorth Pole 44 2 

Rebuilding Messina 3 10 

Recall of ^Liyor Gill (Seattle) 23 13 

Recall of Mayor F'aucett. Tacoma, Wash 33 13 

Recall in California 38 1 

Recall of Judges 38 6 

Recall. Kahn Aids 40 7 

Recall, Kahn on the 39 2 

Recall of the Judiciary 52 1 

Record Passages — 

Astoria-San Francisco 10 5 

Eureka-San Francisco 30 5 

Fishguard-Xew York, Round Trip 16 12 

Guaymas-.\berdeen .T. 38 5 

Honolulu-San Francisco 10 5 

Kabului- Philadelphia 50 5 

Kobe-.Astoria 33 5 

Li veri)ool-Xevv York 2 15 

Newcastle (X. S. W'.VSan Francisco.. 7 5 

Xew York-Havana 31 14 

Philadelphia-Xew-port 33 14 

Portland-Philadelphia 23 12 

Puget Sound-Callao 38 5 

San l->aiicisco-Xew York 12 5 

San Franeisco-Xew York 17 5 

San Francisco-San Pedro 21 5 

San Francisco- Portland 35 5 

San Pedro-Puget Sound 27 5 

Sydney. X. S. VV.-Victoria, B. C 30 5 

Red Cross Seals 15 3 

Reform School, Xavy Not a 45 11 

Regulations for Wireless 33 11 

Remarkable Ship, A 25 11 

Rescue Work in Mines 14 II 

Rescue at Sea 37 5 

Restriction of Immigration 8 H 

Revolution in Portugal 4 12 

Rights of Public Servants 42 2 

Roman Boat Found 41 11 

Running "em Out (By F. H. Buryeson) . . 18 2 

Russia, Recovery of 6 11 

Russian Emigration 4 10 

Russian Labor Legislation 10 3 

Russian Merchant Marine 25 10 

Ruef Case Finally Decided 27 13 

S 

Sailing Vessels, Xunibcr of on .\tlantic 

and'Gulf 24 12 

Sailor and Engineer (By Horace S. True) 43 2 

Sailormen 51 10 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific — 

Seamen's Bill, The (Cal.) 4 7 

Seamen .\warded Extra Pay (Edward 

R. West) 10 5 

Seamen's Case Heard (C. P. R. Co.).. 10 6 
Seamen's Claims Granted (C. P. R. 

Co.) 12 6 



Title 



No. Page 



Seamen in P>ritish Columbia (C. P. R- 

Co.) 15 

Mates, More Rest for lo 

Seamen (B. C.) Ask Investigation 17 

Seamen's Bill in Legislature 18 

Seamen's Bill in Cal. Legislature 21 

Seamen's Bill, The (Cal. Leg.) 23 

All Hail, March Sixth! 25 

Union's Birthday. The 25 

Birthday of the Union ( Labor Clarion) 27 

•■Died at His Post" 33 

Lockout in British Columbia 34 

.Assessment Resolution 3/ 

Furuseth on Assessnient 38 

Seamen Denied Justice 39 

Born on a Lumber Pile 44 

Seamen Win Case 44 

Overtime. Demand for Upheld 4o 

Sailors' Unions. The 47 

From .An Old Comrade (By Carl 
Dreycr) 52 

DECEASED MEMBERS— 

Barrv. Thomas 47 

Berg". Chas 6 

Berletsen. Olaf 41 

Berntsen. Ole 43 

Bressum, Hans 38 

Brinker. l'"red 26 

Bostrom, William 7 

Brown, George 13 

Carlson, Johan 30 

Christiansen, Alfred Chris 22 

Cossovar, Joseph 21 

Dixon, Joseph 25 

Dreyfeldt. Albert 43 

Dongo. Luigi 33 

Dunne, P. Joseph D 39 

Eliascn. Edward 44 

Emanuelson. l.udwig 20 

Fredriksen. Oscar William 22 

Gadd, Ernest 11 

Graham, Thomas 15 

(iravert. Johennes 38 

Gumbel, Gustaf Carl 32 

Gustafson, William 21 

Hansen. Richard 14 

Hay, Isaack 26 

Heilstadius, Gnstav W 2 

Heiirikson, Albert 35 

Henriksson. Carl 30 

Herzog. Herman 13 

Holmberg, Alex 18 

Jacobsen, Elias 27 

Jalonan, Tsak Edward 37 

Jaionen, Johan • 5 

jepsen, Edwin M 43 

Jessamine, .Alex 6 

Johanson, F ■ 43 

Johansson. Johan .Albin 25 

Johnson. Carl Gustaf 26 

Johnson. Carl L 28 

Johnson. Xils 15 

Kraft. John 14 

Kuusik, Peter 47 

Laffery, John 25 

Lane. Leland 37 

Lindholm, .Adolph 34 

Lind, John 36 

Lonngren, Sten Edward 22 

Malm, Axe! 12 

Mastcrson, Dennis 33 

Mc.Avoy, George 22 

McXally. William 35 

Nilsson, Oscar Wilhelm 36 

Petersen, Carl 21 

Petersen, Peter Martin 37 

Rindell, Oscar 18 

Roberts. Charles 43 

Rosquist. Emil ' 5 

Rothman. A 28 

Rusch, Herman Otto 27 

Sande, .Anton 26 

Schankewitz, 46 

Schlitt. James .Alexander 25 

Schmidt. Paul Carl Wilhelm 37 

Shuls. Christian 24 

Sigfried. Johan 31 

Sigfried. Johan 33 

Skific. John 43 

Tighe. Thomas 46 

Toftoy. Karl .Andersen 27 

V.ilcur. .Antoine 14 

Wiklund, Victor 50 

Salmon Packets Lost 4 

Salt Lake, Investigating 11 

Sailors Illtreated 3 

San Francisco "Labor Situation," The... 2 

San Francisco Panama-Pacific Bonds.... 11 
San Francisco Designated by Congress as 

Site of P. -P. Exposition 23 

San Francisco, Dangers Xear 47 

.San Francisco Graft Charges Dropped... 50 

Sardine Industry, Spanish 6 

Sardine Exports, Norwegian 10 

.Sargasso Sea Lost 17 

.Scandinavian Peace Celebration 4 

School Children. 16,0(X),000 6 

Schools, Traveling 11 

Schools in St. Petersburg 28 

Scotch Co-operative Stores 2 

Scotland, Women Farmers in 20 

Scottish People, Thrift of 11 

Seals, Red Cross 15 

Seals, Poachers Killing 19 

Sea Bird, Voyage of 40 

Seamen, Xeeds of .American (By Walter 

Macarthur) 1 



6 
5 
7 
6 
6 
6 
1 
6 
7 
7 
6 
7 
7 
6 
2 
6 
2 
11 



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7 

7 
10 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 
10 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 
10 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 
10 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

7 

5 
11 

7 

6 
12 

13 
10 
12 

3 

2 

3 
12 
10 
10 
11 
11 
11 
10 

3 

2 I 
14 

11 I 



I 



Title No. Pa.: 

Seamen Drowned From Battleship Xew 

Hampshire 3 15 

Seamen's .Appeal, Xew Zealand 8 II 

Seamen, Bravery of Rewarded 10 12 

Seamen's Institute (San Francisco) Cele- 
brates 14 

Seamen, Xew Zealand. Active 17 

Seamen Free in California 24 

Seamen and Citizenship 28 1 

.Seamen's Agreements. Danish 42 

Seamen's Ages, German 35 

Seamen's Bill, .Articles on by .A. Furu- 
seth— 

Peonage and Wages 39 

Remedies That Have I-'ailed 40 

Freedom the Remedy 41 

Seamen and Safety at Sea 45 

In Case of Shipwreck 47 

I-'or Better Forecastles 48 

Unskilled Sailors 49 

Involuntary Servitude 51 

"Seaport." Vice in A 30 

Shi]) Subsidy Bill Passed by Senate 21 1 

Ship. A Remarkable 25 1 

Ship, Most Contented 45 1 

Ships, Locking at Panama 13 

Ships, Xew Ideas in 33 1 

Ships. Oil Engines for 49 1 

Shipbuilding on the Clyde 7-11: 12-1 

Shipbuilding on Lakes 21 

Shipbuilding, .American. Year's 47 1 

Shi])biiilding in England 49 11 

Shipping at Liverpool 3 11 

Shipping Developments 12 10 

Shipi)ing. Lloyd's Register of 20 2 

Shii)ping of Xorway 20 10 

Shipping, Trans-Pacific 25 11 

Shipping in China 28 

.Shipping at .Antwerp 30 

Shipping of Leading Ports 43 

Shall Labor Be Free or Serf? 46 

Shipmaster On Chinese 28 7 

Ship Subsidy. Facts on 28 2 

Shun Prison-Made Goods 30 3 

Six Weeks in Australia (By "El Tuerto") 50 2 

Size of the Oceans 19 11 

Skipper, .A Great ("Charlie" Barr) 22 

Skyscraper in Buenos .Aires 8 1( 

Skyscraper of Forty-Six Stories 10 K 

Skyscraper. First in Milan 10 li 

Sleep, The Mystery of 15 

Sleep of Thirty-Two Years 19 

Smoke Consumer. .Australia 44 

Sobriety, Increase of 13 11 

Socialism, Xew Zealand Labor Rejects.. 2 

Socialism and Plutocracy 50 

Socialism, Democracy and 51 

Socialists Elected 30 L 

"Sojers," Union Men and (By D. R. 

Sassen) 43 

Soo, Traffic at the 39-9: 48-< 

South Africa Line 3 

South Pole, .\mundsen and 42 K 

Spain, General Strike in 2 

Spread of Christianity 6 

Spokane-Santa Rosa Wrecks 43 

St. John, Cargo Traffic via 17 

St. Petersburg, Population of 28 

St. Petersburg, Schools in 28 

Standard Oil Co. Quarterlj' Dividend... 16 

Standardization of Time 29 

Steamship Company Using Oil 4 

Steamship Line, Mexican 10 ,^ 

Steamships, Ocean, Hoodling on 10 10 

Steamship (Olympic), World's Largest.. 13 2 

Steamships for East Africa 14 10 

Steel Works. Krupp 3 2 

Steel Trust. Earnings of 7 ]3 

Statehood Resolution (Arizona New , 

Mexico) Signed 50 li 

Strike. General in Spain 2 I' 

Strikes. Moving Pictures of 15 ^ 

Strikes and Personal Liberty 47 

.Strike. First Recorded 48 1 

Subsidies. Italians and 35 

Substitute for Meerschaum 2 1 

Suicide. Race. Problem 21 1 

Suez Canal. England and 3 

Suez Canal Dues Reduced 10 1 

Suez Canal, The 52 

Suez and Panama 25 

Sunday Work. No 14 li 

Surplus, Not Scarcity of Labor 31 6 

Sweden, Telegraph and Telephone in.... 8 15. 

Swimming in Dead Sea 45 111 

Swim Golden Gate. .Amateurs 46 5i 

Swimming Golden Gate. \\"omen 50 3 

Swiss Railways. Wages on 7 .1l 

T 

Taft on Labor 13 6 

Taft on Injunctions 19 11 

Taft .Against Unions 35 f 

Taking the Queue 21 2 

"Talk on a Trip .Abroad. .A 7 11 

Tampa Cigarmakers. Help 22 2 

Tar and I-^athers (By F. H. Buryeson). 27 2 

Telegraph and Telephone in .Sweden.... 8 1! 

Telephoning, Wireless 19 2 

Telephone, Long-Distance Record 36 \2 

Temperance in Germany 28 l! 

Textile Trade Disputes 3 11 

Thrift of Scottish People.. ^ 11 It 

Three Barges. Seventeen Lives 19 i 

Third Most Populous Country 22 II 

Time, Standardization of , 29 t 

Tobacco Workers' Label 49 5 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-FOUR. 



Title 



No. Page 



Tolstoi, Leo, Death of 11 IS 

Tombs of the Pharaohs 7 10 

Tonnage of United States Merchant 

Marine 38 14 

Tow-Barge, Old Story of the 19 6 

Trade-Unions in Austria 9 10 

Trade-Union Congress, British 10 2 

Trade-Unions in German)' IG 2 

Trade-Unions, British 29 11 

Trade-Unions in Italy 30 10 

Trade-Unions in France 33 2 

Trade-Unions in Holland 34 10 

Trade-Union Funds 40 3 

Trade Education, Phase of 18 11 

Trade Education for Printers 20 11 

Traffic at the Soo 39 9 

Transandean Railway, New 33 10 

Transformation of London 9 11 

Transportation, Ocean 3 3 

Trans-Pacific Shipping 25 11 

Trilnite to American Tools 8 3 

Trick of Fortune, A 37 6 

Trinidad, Coolie Labor in 3 2 

Trust Control Bread? Shall 51 11 

Traveling Schools 11 10 

Tuberculosis in California 49 12 

Two New Ports in Peru 28 11 

U-V 

Unloading Pepper 42 11 

Unionists, Preference to 11 3 

Union (T. T. U.), An Enterprising 15 3 

Unions, Cities May Not Favor 18 9 

Union Shop Card, Demand 19 2 

Unions, Taft Against 35 6 

Union Men and "Sojers" (By D. R. 

Sassen) 43 2 

Union Label Law in California 27 6 

Union Printers' Home 48 2 

United Kingdom, Labor in 17 8 

LTniversal Peace Congress 42 10 

Unrepresentative Government 9 6 

Unemployment, Insurance Against Brit- 
ish Bill 35 4 

Uruguay, Labor Law in 45 10 

United States Navy Second 17 10 

United States Immiffrants to, 1910 19 13 

United States, Beer Sold in 44 12 

United States, Center of Population 46 12 

United States Is Second, Merchant Ma- 
rine 50 8 

Van Schaick, Captain, Paroled 51 6 

Vessels, To Inspectors of 11 2 

Veto Bill (Hritish).^ Passage of 48 15 

Vice in a "Seaport" • • • • '^^ ^ 

Victory for Humanity CWomen's Eight- 
Hour Law) .' 28 6 

Votes Sold in Ohio • 18 13 

Voyage of a Bottle, Long 9 10 

W-Y 

Wages in Asia Minor 4 3 

Wages on Swiss Railways 7 3 

Wages in English Silk Mills 12 10 

Wages of English Bakers 13 10 

Wages in South Africa 17 8 

Wages, Cotton Mill 17 9 

Wages, Australian Officers 20 11 

Warren and Free Press 20 6 

Warships, Fastest 32 12 

Waves, Height of 25 5 

Welcome the Printers (I. T. U. Conven- 
tion) 48 6 

Wellman Picked Up 7 13 

Wellman's Airship 16 12 

Whirlpool, Belgium 7 7 

Wind Blows, Why the 25 11 

Wireless Record 12 5 

Wireless, Yokohama-Honolulu 13 5 

Wireless on African Lines 13 11 

Wireless, First Woman Operator 13 12 

Wireless Record Overland 15 13 

Wireless Telephoning 19 2 

Wireless Record for "Farthest North".. 20 5 

Wireless, Sea to Shore Record 22 5 

Wireless, Orders to Fit With 32 5 

Wireless, Regulations for 33 11 

Women's Eiglit-Hour Law (California) 

28-1; 34-2; 37-6; 40-6; 45-6 

Woman Suffrage in France 9 10 

Woman Suffrage in Iceland 34 12 

Woman Suffrage in Norway 30 3 

Woman Suffrage in Washington 13 13 

Women Workers in France, Increase of 29 4 

Women in Japan 29 11 



Title No. Page 

Women in Legislature (Colo.) 9 13 

Women Indorse Label 11 11 

Women Farmers in Scotland 20 11 

Women Elected in Colorado 31 13 

Workmen's Compensation — 

Accident Insurance in Norway 5 11 

Workmen's Compensation 17 11 

Employes' Compensation Law 33 11 

For Workmen's Compensation 35 1 

Fateful Division, A 39 10 

Workmen's Compensation 40 2 

Law (Work. Com.) Explained, New... 41 2 

Workmen's Compensation 41 3 

Workinen's Insurance 44- 10 

Workmen's Compensation 47 10 

Employers' Liability Tendency 48 2 

Workmen's Compensation 48 6 

Workmen's Compensation 49 11 

Industrial Accident Board (Cal.) 50 6 

Compulsory Compensation 51 7 

Industrial Accident Board (Cal.) 52 6 

World's Greatest Port 2 11 

World Language, A 5 3 

World's Largest Steamship (Olympic) . . 13 2 

Work of Life-Savers 47 9 

Wreck of the Preussen 13 11 

Wrecks in Alaska 19 5 

Wrecks on the Coast 42 10 

Wrecks, Spokane-Santa Rosa 43 6 

Wreck, Press on the 44 1 

Wrecks — 

Abbie G. Cole 16 12 

.Active 1 5 

Albertville 2 15 

Albion 5 5 

Alfonso XIII 31 12 

.■\nuir 38 5 

Anim 18 14 

Annesley 19 5 

Annie C. Grace 25 12 

Arcadia 12-12; 13-12; 14-5 

Asia 33-5; 35-5; 40-5 

Baroness (barge) 11 12 

Bedford (British Navy) 10 15 

Ben Ern 40 14 

Beir-Thuan 25 14 

Bertha 3 5 

Blackburn 13 15 

Bor I 42 15 

Brazoria 22 12 

Brilliant (barge) 47 14 

Buteshire 30 14 

Cavaliere Ciampa 50 5 

Cedric 16 4 

Charles Henry 49 14 

Cbiri<iui 4 5 

Christine 36 S 

City of St. Joseph 41 14 

Comet 52 5 

Cottage City 20-5; 22-5 

Cox and Green 17 12 

Crompton 11-5; 15-7 

Crown Prince 8 12 

Czarina 27 5 

Damcra 5-5; 6-5; 7-5; 9-5 

Damerland 42 14 

Dcbago 36 12 

Duncarn 14-5; 24-5 

Eclipse 43 5 

Ella M. Goodwin 25 12 

EUisland 14-5; 24-5 

Emir ...48 15 

Emma Knowlton 31-14; 46-14 

Enterprise • 10-12; 11-12 

Eugene Cathrell 50 14 

Fannie E. Mofifat 52 14 

Florence Leland 9 12 

Francisco 51 15 

Frank H. Stenson 13 12 

F. S. Redfield 50 5 

F. W. Pickles 11 12 

General 12 12 

Greenbank 23 14 

Golden Arrow 9 12 

Harlaw 30 14 

Harry K. Fooks 6 15 

Henrietta G. Martin 29 14 

H. J. Logan 31 14 

Hjordis 47 5 

Irma 45 14 

Iroquois 31 5 

Jabez Howes 32 5 

James Davidson 52 14 

J. C. Strawbridge 27 12 



Title No. Page 

Jeanie 16 12 

Jessie Minor 52 5 

J. Manchester Haynes 31 14 

John Irwin 46 14 

John Rose 52 14 

Kellog (Barge) 1 15 

Kingdom of the Holy Ghost and Us 

Sect 36 5 

Knight of St. George 51 5 

Kurdistan 9 12 

La France 37 5 

Langen 23 12 

Louise 15 5 

Lutz 43 14 

Lyrahurst 51 5 

Madeline 50 5 

Majestic 1 5 

Malcolm B. Seavey 51 14 

Manuel R. Cuza 35 14 

Marion Frazer 8-5; 32-5 

Martha E. Wallace 17 12 

Mary Bradford Pierce 35 14 

Marv Sachs 7 5 

Mastoria 10 12 

Matanzas 14 12 

Meijoo 35 12 

Mercedes 12 12 

Merida 35 14 

Moi Wahine 25 5 

Mollie Rhodes 18 12 

Mount Park 24 14 

N. E. Ayer 16 12 

New York 3 15 

Northwest 38 14 

Northwestern 12-5; 13-5; 14-5 

Olivebank 25 5 

Olympia 14-5; 16-5; 52-5 

Oshkosh 23-5; 25-5 

Ottawa 31-14; 32-9 

Palermo IS 4 

Pallas 10 12 

Pandora 34 14 

Parisiana 21 12 

Phoenix 1 5 

Portland 10-5; 11-5; IS-S 

Port Stanley 32 5 

Preference 17 12 

Preussen 9-15; 13-11 

Princess Victoria 16 5 

Puritan 45-5 ; 47-5 

Ragulus 8 12 

"R. N. B." 24 12 

Rosario di Giorgio 25 12 

S. A. Fownes 16 12 

Sailor (Barge) 34 14 

Sailor Boy 46-5; 48-5 

San Nicholas 33 12 

Santa Rosa 43-5; 48-5 

Savona 16 4 

Sea Light 11 S 

Sea Prince 10-5; 15-5; 22-5 

Selby Abbey 18 14 

Selja 11-5; 13-5 

Selma 3 15 

Sesostris SO 5 

Signal 42 5 

Silverdalc 11-12; 14-5 

Sonoma (Barge) 43 5 

Spokane 42-5; 46-5; 48-S 

St. Hugo 39 S 

St. Denis 16-5; 18-5; 20-5 

Stephen G. Loud 16 12 

St. Hugo 39 r4 

Strack 25 14 

Susan N. Pickering 48 14 

Susie M. Plummer 15 5 

Sylvia M. Nunan 27 12 

Syrus 47 14 

Taboga 37-14; 39-14 

Teresa D. Baker 35 14 

Thekla 51 5 

Theresa Wolf 49 14 

Thomas B. Garland 16 12 

Triton 32 5 

"U-3" (German submarine) 20 14 

Umbria 28 5 

Ville de Rochefort 5 12 

Washcalore 37 5 

W. C. Moreland 11 9 

W. H. Morston 37-5; 38-5 

William E. Bowen, Ir 13-12; 14-12 

William H, Davidson 16 12 

Willie R. Hume 24-5; 25-5; 27-5 

Yucatan 16 5 

Wynne, John, Sentence Commuted 15 5 

Year's American Shipbuilding 47 11 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 




VOL. XXIV. No. 1. 


SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21.1910. 


Whole No. 2087. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S FIGHT. 



CAN CONCENTRATED CAPITAL crush 
the organizations of labor? Does the com- 
ing of the trust mean the introduction of 
industrial feudalism, "benevolent" or otherwise? 

A great struggle has been going on for two 
years between the Steel Trust and the Lake Sea- 
men's Union to settle these questions. Every- 
where but on the open waters of the Great 
Lakes, the titantic trust of trusts has crushed all 
organized resistance by its employes. 

The method of attack by the trust has been the 
same in every instance. It has been the method 
of the iron hand in the velvet glove. It has been 
a combination of bribery and violence. With one 
hand it oflers petty playthings as favors and char- 
ity. With the other it wields the bludgeon of 
governmental power and personal terrorism. It 
would have the worker exchange his union, his 
liberty, his manhood, for a picayune pension, "co- 
operation," and cunningly devised "Welfare" 
schemes. 

The seamen have fought long and hard to gain 
some larger-* share of the wealth their skill and 
strength adds to the materials they transport. In 
1899 they formed their union. There had been no 
limit in length of hours, almost no limit in lowness 
of wages. The union reduced the hours per day to 
ten. It raised the wages of wheelsmen from be- 
tween $20 and $30 a month to between $50 and 
$65, depending upon the season. It raised the 
pay of common seamen from less than $15 a 
month to $30 and $40. It fought every inch of 
this upward way. It won its strikes, and finally 
made the Great Lakes a "Closed Shop." For 
the five years beginning in 1903 the Lake Car- 
riers' Association met the representatives of the 
union each spring and fixed wages and conditions 
of employment for the following season. 

Then came the Steel Trust. It had crushed the 
once powerful .Amalgamated Association of Iron, 
Steel and Tin Plate Workers, and had developed 
a, system- of exploitation within its mills that 
ground the bodies of its men into profits in the 
shortest possible time, and with the least pos- 
sible expenditure for the upkeep of the human 
cog in the machine. 

Having done this the Steel Trust offered its 
employes some skimpy pensions and a chance to 
buy steel common and become "partners" in their 
own skinning. 

The trust gets its ore largely from Minnesota. 
This ore is carried on mammoth, especially made 
boats, to docks with wonderful machinery for 
loading and unloading. All this makes it pos- 
sible for one man on these boats or working at 
the docks to do the work that took a hundred 
men less than a generation ago. But the Steel 



Trust is anxious that not one penny of this in- 
creased production should go to the workers. 

So it set about smashing the Lake Seamen's 
Union. The Pittsburg Steamship Company is 
one of the arms of the Steel Trust. It dominates 
the Lake carrying trade as completely as its fel- 
low members of the trust dominate the making 
of steel. Its representatives stated publicly and 
frankly with regard to its competitors that "the 
Pittsburg Steamship Company has got to be the 
voice and the other fellow the echo." 

In the spring of 1908 the voice spoke and the 
echoes answered that the Lake Seamen must be 
crushed. In the beginning there was no talk of 
reducing wages. Indeed there were loud protesta- 
tions that wages would not be reduced. The 
workers having clubbed tne trust into granting 
favors, the trust only asked that the club with 
which it had been licked be surrendered. "Just 
give us all your weapons, and trust us to be good 
to you," was the plea of the steel barons. 

It was even more free of promises. "If you 
will only render yourself helpless we will build 
some nice little rooms for you to rest in, where 
our spies can keep watch of -you, and if you die 
at sea will give you a burial service; in return 
for which you must sign a statement renouncing 
all connection with the union and giving your 
mind and body, your liberty and your labor en- 
tirely to our keeping." 

Here is a part of the oath that must be taken 
before a seaman gets a job on a Lake Carrier 
boat: "I hereby renounce all allegiance to any 
and all labor unions, particularly the stewards, 
seamen, firemen, and oilers, and I declare it to 
be my intentions not to join either as long as I 
follow sailing for a living." 

So war was declared by the Steel Trust. Since 
then it has been waged bitterly. The story of 
that war is written in human lives. Nearly every 
efficient sailor upon the Lakes belongs to the 
Seamen's Union. For five years it had main- 
tained the Closed Shop, and had taught its mem- 
bers the need and the value of unionism. The 
trust wanted men. It revived the "crimping" 
system by which men were made drunk and 
forced on board boats, and compelled to work 
under threat of shooting for "mutiny." It gath- 
ered up mere children from the wharves and set 
them doing work that strained the powers of 
strong men. 

When these great marine tools of transporta- 
tion were placed in the hands of ignorant men 
and boys the result was soon seen in a terrible 
toll of human life. 

Read this official record of the vessels and lives 
lost and vessels wrecked and judge whether in- 
dustrial battles are harmless things. 



In 1907 every vessel carried a union crew. In 
this year twenty-seven vessels of all descriptions 
were totally lost and twenty-three lives were 
taken by Lake accidents. 

Of these accidents but two were caused by col- 
lisions. 

In the season of 1909, when the "scab shop" 
had been established, when the poor derelicts of 
the docks and the sea-crazed boys made up the 
crews, thirty-four vessels went down to complete 
loss and one hundred and nine lives went out. 
The Marine Review, the organ of the Lake Car- 
riers' Association, in commenting on this grim 
record says that of the causes of all accidents 
"collisions lead." 

In its fight to crush the unions the Steel Trust 
is not deterred by the destruction of its own or 
other property. The greatest engineering work 
on the Great Lakes is the "Soo" Canal, through 
which there passes a traffic many times greater 
than through the famous canal across the 
Isthmus of Suez. In June. 1909, a boat manned 
by non-union men rammed the gates of one of 
the gigantic locks in this canal. These gates 
gave way and a great waterfall was created in 
the midst of this structure. With the force of a 
miniature Niagara it picked up the boat that had 
caused it and tossed it from side to side, a mon- 
strous, destructive projectile, smashing other 
vessels and destroying hundreds of thousands of 
dollars' worth of property. Not only was this 
property destroyed in the first few hours, hut this 
greatest highway of commerce on the globe was 
completely blocked for months in the midst of 
the transportation season. It is safe to say that 
greater damage was done to property by this 
single accident than by all the much heralded 
violence of strikers during the last twenty years. 

No troops were called out to prevent such de- 
struction of life and property. No investigation 
has been made. The Steel Trust owns the Gov- 
ernment that owns the canal. 

So great has been the increased risk to prop- 
erty that Lake insurance companies have raised 
the rate on steel vessels, such as are used by the 
Lake Carriers' Association, one per cent. But 
■ the Steel Trust does not care. It can pay that 
and much more if it can be assured of manacled 
slaves in its boats for years to come. 

There is no other issue than this of submissive 
slaves. The union had made no demand for bet- 
ter conditions. The trust started the fight. It 
started it with a demand that the union be given 
up, and that its "Welfare" plan, which the pic- 
turesque vocabulary of the sailors has trans- 
formed into a "hellfare" plan, be substituted. 

The fight is still on. The union has kept up 
its battle for two years without calling upon any 
outside organization for help. Its officers say 
that the fight can be kept up another two years 
before the resources of the union are exhausted. 

What will the outcome be? Will the trust suc- 
ceed in crushing the last remnant of organized 
opposition to tyranny among its men? Will this 
he the beginning of an industrial feudalism which 
can be broken only by a wild and violent up- 
rising? Or will labor he able to maintain its 
power of determinecl resistance to exploitation 
until it shall take and operate the trusts for its 
own benefit? — Coming Nation. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



A "PRACTICAL" CHURCH. 



Mr. Z. \V. Craig, a well-known trade- 
unionist, delivered a "Labor Sunday" ad- 
dress in the St. Andrew's Presbyterian 
Church at San Pedro, Cal., on September 4. 
Following is the substance of Mr. Craig's 
remarks : 

One day last week I met your pastor on 
the street and he said: 

"On the Sunday night preceding Labor 
Day we are going to have a special service 
at our church for workingmen. I want you 
to speak on the question of 'Why the Work- 
ingmen Do Not Attend Church.' You are 
a workingman, and you do not attend 
church, and ought to be an authority on that 
question." 

I expressed some doubt as to my ability 
to do the subject full justice, but finally 
consented to discuss the problem as I see it. 
If I were to answer the question as to 
why I do not attend church, I should be 
compelled to answer that I "would rather 
be at home." When my day's work is done 
I can not get home quick enough, and I do 
not go down town nights for the same 
reason that I stay at home on Sunday morn- 
ings. I am a literal believer in the words 
of the late John Howard Payne, who said, 
"Be it ever so humble, there is no place 
like home." 

That is my own experience, and for many 
years I lived in a home which was exceed- 
ingly humble. That I live in a better one 
now is due to no special effort of myself, 
but to the benefactions of several different 
relatives that have gone to the Great Be- 
yond and left me a portion of their accumu- 
lated wealth. 

For my own part I have always devoted 
my leisure time to what I have considered 
the more important avocation of making 
men, rather than the mere making of money. 
It is for this reason that I have been inter- 
ested in the labor movement, and am still 
interested. I consider organized labor one 
of the best fields in the world for the de- 
velopment of men. The great Carpenter 
of Nazareth started out on his career with 
an organization of men. With all due re- 
spect to the church, He did not go to the 
church to find them, either. He went to 
the beach, on the shores of the Sea of 
Galilee, and chose His disciples from among 
the lowly fishermen. The great maxims 
which He left to posterity are, "Peace on 
Earth, Good Will Toward Men" ; "Love One 
Another," and "As Ye Would That Men 
Should Do Unto You, Do Ye Even So to 
Them." He did not say much about going 
to church. He said, "Follow m.e, and I will 
make you fishers of men." 

It seems to me that many churches have 
forgotten the very essence of their own re- 
ligion. They pay more attention to the 
next world than they do to this. They 
undertake to frighten people into the ac- 
ceptance of their particular brand of re- 
ligion. The secret of the success of the 
religion of Jesus Christ has been through 
love, and not through fear. Compulsion is 
repugnant to the nature of any independent 
mind. The successful wife will admit, if put 
to the test, that she rules her husband by 
kindness and tact. She can lead him in 
almost any direction, "with a piece of rope 
yarn," as the sailor man would say, but she 
can not drive him an inch with a rolling-pin. 
In my opinion it is a waste of good money 
to build a fine edifice like this, and have it 



open only about four hours, all told, once 
a week. The true Christian should live his 
religion every day in the year. He should 
carry it with him to work, and, most im- 
portant of all, bring it home with him at 
night. The making of a happy home 
should not rest wholly on the wife and 
mother. The chances are that when bed- 
time conies the mother is the more tired of 
the two. A cross and crabbed father does 
not help the matter very much. He is likely 
to make a bad matter worse by that sort 
of conduct. He has a fine -chance to prac- 
tice the Golden Rule on such occasions. If 
he would ask himself the question, "How 
would you like to have some one growl at 
you after you had scrubbed, swept, baked, 
washed and cooked all day with a bunch of 
squalling kids hanging to your skirts?" that 
would certainly hold him for a while, if he 
answered the query truthfully. 

On the other hand, the wife who would 
be successful should remember that the 
husband, too, may have had troubles of his 
own during the day. He may have had no 
one to tell his troubles to, and nothing 
seems to give a person so much relief as to 
air their grievances. The tactful wife will 
listen lo nr.d sympathize with him when he 
is right, but if he is wrong, it takes a genius 
to make him believe it, and make him 
willing to take his medicine. 

The successful wife should be, perhaps 
first of all, a good cook, and if the husband 
has any regard for his happiness in this 
world, or the next, he should be right on 
hand to eat his food when it is cooked. It 
is gratifying to know that our public schools 
sre now teaching the important art of cook- 
ing to our young girls who are to be the 
wives and mothers of the coming genera- 
tion. 

It may be asked, "What has all this to do 
with the workingman going to church?" It 
has this much to do with it, that if an occa- 
sional sermon were preached along these lines, 
in my opinion, more men would attend church. 
A certain philosopher said, about thirty 
years ago, that "If the churches do not 
change their tactics, in another generation 
they will be preaching to benches, bonnets 
and bibs." It would almost seem as if his 
prophecy has come true, as the subject be- 
fore the house to-night seems to be "Why 
don't the men come to church?" 

This naturally leads to the question, 
"What kind of a church would you build, 
and how would you run it if you were go- 
ing to build a church?" Well, the first 
thing I would do would be to look right 
down into the conditions of men and study 
what they need the most. If I am not mis- 
taken, the first thing a man needs after his 
work is done is to be made clean. The next 
is food and rest. After rest comes recrea- 
tion. He can read the news of the day while 
he is resting. He may even acquire the bad 
habit of reading too much, and of reading a 
poor kind of books, papers and magazines. 
He should be offered other forms of amuse- 
ment and recreation. "Many men have 
many minds," and what is suitable for one 
may not be to the liking of others. Men 
should be given the widest possible limit of 
freedom in their conduct, providing they 
do not interfere with any other man's rights. 
Music and art should be among the features 
provided. Some may say, "Well, you do 
not propose to put all of these things here 
in the church, do you?" I answer no! But 
I would build a different kind of a church. 



I would build a church something on the 
order of the city hall, and build it right 
down town, in the heart of the business dis- 
trict. Only I would remodel the building 
somewhat. I would commence at the top 
of the dome and tear off the galvanized 
iron and put stained glass in its stead. I 
would cut a light well at least twenty feet 
in diameter through the second floor. I 
would have billiard and pool tables, baths, 
a gymnasium and every modern con- 
venience, including a restaurant on the 
ground floor. I would convert the second 
floor into a vast assembly hall, where there 
could be some sort of a lecture, or enter- 
tainment, every night in the week. I would 
have the finest music that money could pro- 
cure, with perhaps an organ recital of some 
classic number, duly advertised, at least 
once an hour during the day and evening. 

On the third floor I would have rare and 
beautiful flowers, tastily arranged around 
the balcony, with seats and retiring rooms 
and parlors for ladies. These could be made 
popular for the various societies meeting 
from week to week. 

These are only a few of the features that 
might be combined in a practical church. 
A church that men will attend, because they 
will not be able to resist the temptation. 

Man is a social animal. He seeks the 
companionship of his kind. Not in an audi- 
ence merely, but with opportunities for con- 
versation and discussion. The church that 
will succeed in the future must take this 
into account. The new Y. M. C. A. in Los 
Angeles is an illustration of what can be 
accomplished along that line. It will soon 
have to be doubled in capacity. The new 
Union Labor Temple is another. The Sail- 
ors' Union branch here has done very well, 
but they have not gone far enough, yet 
when one sees the improvement in the con- 
ditions over that of but a few years ago 
the change is most remarkable. 

In my opinion the church and the trade 
union should not be left to do this work 
alone. It might well be made a quasi- 
municipal affair and paid for out of the 
general taxation. If we had that kind of 
a church in San Pedro, I am almost of the 
opinion that we could dispense with the 
police force and the city jail. It might be 
a profitable investment from the taxpayers' 
standpoint. We hear a lot about children's 
playgrounds — and they are most important 
— but how about a playground for men? 

The church has wasted a lot of energy in 
some States and communities in abolishing 
the .saloons — the poor man's club house — but 
they have put nothing in their place. 

You say you are "sorry for the poor 
workingman, and especially the man who 
is addicted to the habit of drink," but the 
question is how sorry? Are you willing to 
provide a place that is more attractive to 
him than the saloon? Are you willing to 
go down in your pocket as a taxpayer, pr 
as a member of a voluntary association to 
build a church that the workingman will 
attend? You admit that he don't attend 
the one you have now. 

You must not expect an institution like 
that proposd to yield financial dividends. It 
ought to yield a continuous crop of good 
men. There is no money in practical re- 
form or honest politics for honest men. The 
financial returns are in the other kind of 
politics. The only reward is the satisfaction 
of knowing that you have done what is 
right, and, after all, that is really the only 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



reward worth having. The great progress 
now being made along these lines should 
be most encouraging to every true friend 
of the human race. Every community in 
the land should engage in the work. The 
world is getting better all the time. We 
can all help some, to make it better yet. 
There should be a strong organization in 
every city and hamlet in the land to fur- 
ther the cause along. In my opinion it is 
in this way that we can best promote real 
Christianity; in other words, "Peace on 
earth, good will toward men." 



DISAPPEARANCE OF SEAMAN. 



A ship was lying in harbor intending to 
sail during the night. The first and second 
engineers returned from a visit on shore to 
the ship about 10 p. m., and went to lie 
down in their bunks. The night was very 
hot, and the second engineer, who had par- 
tially undressed, telling his companion that 
he wanted a breath of fresh air, went on 
deck. He was never again seen alive, but 
the next morning his dead body was found 
in the water close to the ship. His widow 
claimed compensation. At the hearing it 
was proved that the two engineers were in 
the habit of going on deck on hot nights to 
cool themselves, and used to sit on a rail 
on the starboard quarter of the vessel. The 
body was found immediately below this rail. 
The County Court judge made an award in 
favor of the widow, holding that the de- 
ceased had met his death by an accident 
arising out of and in the course of the em- 
ployment. The ship-owners appealed, and 
the Court of Appeal allowed the appeal. The 
widow appealed to the House of Lords. 

The House of Lords held that even if (as 
was supposed) the man had fallen from this 
rail where he was in the habit of sitting and 
so been drowned, his sitting on the rail was 
in no way connected with his employment ; 
and that there was no evidence justifying 
the County Court judge in finding that the 
accident had arisen out of as well as in the 
course of the employment. Therefore the 
widow was held not to be entitled to com- 
pensation, and the appeal was dismissed. — 
Marshall vs. Owners of the "Wild Rose," 
House of Lords, July Uth, 1910. 



WIDOW DENIED DAMAGES. 



While a ship was lying in drydock, the 
second-engineer, having finished his work on 
board for the morning, went home to dinner. 
On his way back the chief-engineer met him, 
and they walked together to the side of 
the dock, when the chief-engineer went on 
board, leaving the other man talking to a 
friend on the dock side. A little later the 
dead body of the second-engineer was found 
in the dock, he apparently having fallen 
over the edge. There was no kind of evi- 
dence as to the cause of the accident. The 
widow applied for compensation under the 
Act. The County Court judge held that it 
was usual for seamen in port to go ashore 
for their meals, and that the deceased was 
on shore as part of his duty to get his din- 
ner and in the course of his employment. 
He accordingly made an award in favor of 
the appellant. The employers appealed. 

The Court of Appeal held that as a rule 
a workman is not entitled to the benefits 
of the Act when an accident happens to 
him on his way from home to the place 
where he works, unless evidence can be 



given justifying an inference that the ac- 
cident arose out of and in the course of 
the employment. Here there was no evi- 
dence to justify any such inference. The 
appeal was accordingly allowed. — Gilbert vs. 
Owners of Steam Trawler Nizan, Court of 
Appeal, July 8th, 1910. 



GIANT LINERS BUILDING. 



The White Star line is building two of the 
greatest steamships in the world, the Olym- 
pic and Titanic, at Harland & WolfT's ship- 
yards at Belfast. 

These fine ships, each 860 feet long, are be- 
ing reared side by side in two huge "gan- 
tries," or cradles, measuring 1000 feet long 
and 110 feet wide — the largest ever designed. 
They are 70 feet longer and 13,000 tons 
heavier than any vessel now afloat. Their 
dead weight at launching time is estimated 
to be between -25,000 and 30,000 tons, while 
their displacement will be more than 60,000 
tons. 

A new system of hydraulic riveting is be- 
ing employed in securing the staunchest pos- 
sible hulls. In each ship's double bottom 
over 500,000 rivets are used, totaling 270 
tons. The rivers are first heated, not in the 
charcoal braziers of olden times, but in por- 
table oil furnaces, where the liquid fuel is 
sprayed by compressed air, quickly creating 
an intense heat, well distributed through the 
furnace. The riveting machines themselves, 
each weighing over seven tons, are the larg- 
est and most powerful in the world, yet, sus- 
pended from convenient traveling cranes, 
they can be moved quickly to any section 
and operated by two workmen. Moreover, 
the familiar ear-splitting whirr of recent riv- 
eting devices is eliminated, the rivets being 
clamped noiselessly. 

The giant "boss-arm" frames, as the huge 
brackets that support the three propeller 
shafts are called, weigh 73^/2 tons, and the 
rudder weighs 100 tons. The largest single 
plate employed in each vessel's side weighs 
4-yi tons, and is 36 feet long, and the largest 
single beam supporting the decks measures 
92 feet, topping four tons. The fact that 
these ships are 860 feet long while the Metro- 
politan building's tower is only 700 feet high, 
speaks eloquently of their immense propor- 
tions, but when it is pointed out that their 
tonnage far exceeds that of the combined 
fleets engaged in the historic Spanish ar- 
mada conflict, one begins to understand 
their huge and overtowering dimensions. 
The ships will be equipped for 600 first-class, 
500 second-class and 2000 third-class passen- 
gers, with a crew of 800. 

Many innovations are planned, such as an 
interdenominational chapel, a deck entirely 
reserved for sea games, such as golf, bull- 
board, etc., a "squash" court, a children's 
playground, in charge of a nursery gov- 
erness, a servants' hall and dining saloon, a 
turkish and electric bath, swimming pool 
and gymnasium, such as are on the steam- 
ship Adriatic, but of greater proportions, af- 
fording the passengers an opportunity to en- 
joy the trip to the fullest extent. 

The Olympic will enter the Atlantic trade 
in the summer of 1911 and the Titanic in 
the early fall following. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Emil Christ Hansen, the eminent Danish 
scientist, who died recently, was the inven- 
tor of the method of producing pure yeast 
which is now employed by all European 
breweries. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 154 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Subdivisions. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, l}/^ Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Maritime. Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake Seamen's Unibn, 143 West Madison St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Australasia. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus 
tralia. 

25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf, Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 
Great Britain. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E., 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull. 

Belgium. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Diepestr 
152, Antwerpen, Belgium. 

Germany. 

Zentralverband Seemannischer Arbeiter, Ham- 
burg 1, Bensenbinderhof 57, IV., Zimmer 54 
(Gewerkschaftshaus), Germany. 

France. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place de la 
Joliette. 

Norway. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund, Stavanger, Norway. 

Sweden. 
Svenska-Sjomens-og Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 
Denmark. 
Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Holdbod- 
gade 11, Kid., Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Told- 
boldgade 8, Denmark. 

Holland. 
Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, 2 e 
Atjehstr. 6, Amsterdam. 

Italy. 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Mare, 
Genova Vico Casosini, No. 8, Italy. 
Austria. 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

Spain. 

Fedcracion Nacional de Obreros de Mar de 
Buques V pucrto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 (Bar- 
ccloneta), Spain. 

Uruguay. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Marincros, Monte- 
video, Rampla 103, Uruguay. 

Argentina. 

Lega Obrera (Sailors and Firemen) Sinforiano 
Co'-vetto. Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos) 
und Suarez 44. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



As regards the proportion of trade- 
unionists to population, Denmark 
stands first with 48 per cent, and 
Sweden next with 40 per cent. 

The Dunedin (N. Z.) Harbor Board 
will shortly erect an up-to-date 
shelter shed for the convenience of 
workers at that port, which judging 
bj' the plans should be second to none 
in the Dominion. 

There are 120 industrial unions of 
employers in New Zealand, with a 
total membership of 3699. Canterbury 
has the greatest membership with 1313 
members, 508 of whom are members 
of the Sheepowners' Union. 

At the Glebe police court recently, 
Farrar Hardwick was charged under 
the Factories Act with not having his 
gas engine and mill gearing fenced 
around as provided by regulations. 
In each case he was fined £1, with 6s. 
costs. 

A New South Wales Commercial 
Travelers' Union, affiliated with the 
Sydney Labor Council, is now estab- 
lished. The Queensland travelers arc 
being urged to follow suit if they de- 
sire the support of union influence in 
the disposal of goods. 

In the Queensland House of Repre- 
sentatives recently. Labor Member 
Higgs gave notice of a motion in 
favor of the appointment of a Royal 
Commission on the sugar industry, 
all interests, including those of the 
public, to be represented thereon. 

The majority of the Spanish work- 
men, it is claimed by the Govern- 
ment, are not in favor of the general 
strike proclaimed by the Workmen's 
Federation. The bakers and the em- 
ployes of the street railways and the 
electric lighting plants have refused 
to join the strike, which will deprive 
it of much of its effect upon the rou- 
tine of every day life. 

In the year ended December 20. 
1909, white labor was represented in 
the sugar industry of Queensland by 
26,377 persons, and in New South 
Wales by 4207. The numbers for 
black labor were, respectively, 1685 
and 251. The totals in 1905 were: 
White — Queensland 11.843, New 
South Wales 6094; black — Queens- 
land 7970, New South Wales 482. 

In December, 1908, the Brisbane 
Clothing Trade Wages Board first met 
to consider the wages of employes, 
and it has been considering it ever 
since. It has been considering it 
ever since. It is, however, confidently 
expected, says the Brisbane Worker, 
that before the latter end of this cen- 
tury, or the beginning of the next, the 
board will be able to promulgate its 
award. 

At Adelaide, Australia, recently the 
Amalgamated Society of Engineers 
sued a member for £7 4s 8d due as 
fees, levies, fines, and dues. The mag- 
istrate made an order for the amount, 
with £1 17s costs, to be paid within 
one year. A similar case against an- 
other member for 19s 5d resulted in 
an order for the payment of that 
amount, with £1 17s costs. 

Labor Member Collins, when speak- 
ing on the Address-in-Reply in the 
Queensland Legislative Assembly, in 
a reference to the long hours and low 
pay in the sugar mills, asked how a 
man could keep a wife and rear a fam- 
ily in comfort on the miserable wage 
of £1 14s per week. No wonder, said 
he, the birth-rate is not on the in- 
crease, when we have such conditions 
as exist at the present time in Queens- 
land. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Union Made Clothing for Sea Faring Men 



MEN'S SUITS MADE TO ORDER 
First Class Goods Low Prices 



F. M. & C. B. CAMNON 439 Front, 440 Beacon St., San Pedro 



BEN. B. LIPPMAN 

S32 BEACON & S31 FRONT, ntxt to Fritz & Ernett 
SAN PEORO CAL. 

COMPLETE SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

Union Gooda for Union Men 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All Koods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men Invited to inspect our 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BRO WIV 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am In position to know the class of goods you want The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at SO cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stifif, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Oranga, N. J. 
VIARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 18, New York, N. Y. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embaltner 

Fourth Street, 

Between Front and Bsacon 8ta., 

SAN PEDRO. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., GPP. ». P. DEPOT, 

■AN PEDRO, CAL. 



WALK-OVER SHOES 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 



LEVY'S DEPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

515 Front St. 614 Beacon St. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers In 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 



1 


Named shoes are frequently made in 






Non-Union factories. 




^^^^T&S^^ 


^ NO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 




^WORKERS UNION 
1 E^ 


no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 




lUNIOH^SIMP 


UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 




E factory NO. 

Boot and 


Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 

Shoe Workers' Union 




246 SUMN 


[ER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 




John F. Tobin, Pres. 


Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 





INFORMATION WANTED. 

Fred Bjorn or Bjornsen, a native of 
Trondjem, Norway, is requested to 
communicate with his brother, H. J. 
Bjornsen. Address H. J. Bjornsen, 
Well Street Sailors' Home, London 
E., England. 

Fritz Schmalkuche, who in March 
last was employed on board the Amer- 
ican schooner Endeavor, bound for 
San Pedro, is inquired for by the 
German Consul, 201 Sansome street, 
San Francisco. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Soren P. Nielsen, a native of 
Aarhus, Denmark, born 1887, is in- 
quired for by his sister. Address, 
Danish Consulate, New Orleans, La. 

Arthur Taplett, age 18,. last heard 
from at Wilmington, N. C, in April, 
1908, is inquired for by relatives. 
Please forward any information con- 
cerning him to Mrs. Eleanor M. Her- 
man, R. F. D. No. 4, Box 310, Ta- 
coma, Wash. 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Aire, Oscar Le Bloa, Sylvian 

Anderson, T. -557 Larsen. J. -1542 

Anderson, J. G. Michelson, J. 

Abell, B. Moss. A. 

Andersson, G. -41 Menz, Paul 

Andersen, A. M. Meyer, H. 

-1055 Moore, J. M. 

Andersen, A. 1447 M^f''*'^' Ediaard 

Anderson, J. -1514 McDonough, W. 

Adams, Jacob JJ^"'?.^*'' IJ'chard 

Anibearnsen, Algoy Mueller, Hugo 

Apps, P. Nielsen, SI vert 
Anderson, Martin 



Nielsen, A. -10S4 
Newman. David 



inf.7.on rn^T"^ Nevander. Alex. 

AndersseA, Frank ^^'/i!"' ;^°'?4l£- 

Andprson Pari Nordgren. Chas. 

Ar"Hfiniu"s, a[as. Nestor. Wilson 

Behrend, F. C. S'^T ■^-'i;,! 

Birry, James ?J°^f,;an L 

Backman, Krnest g^n Eddie 

Blander. W. Nicholas, Thomas 

Bostrom, W. Nvstrom R 

{^^?Un"'r"T',nU.l Ohlsen, Viidemar 

Boylan, C. J. (pkg) (,, „_ 'p .gr, 

Bluniquist, C. X !f "' 4 i. una 

Bordjelm, Alex. S |!°"'»^- ?ir"""^ 

Bowman, K. Hj. O sen, H. -885 

Beyerly, Rupert H,!i"-„ >ho = 

Bell, Frank M. Ottesen. Chiis. 

Carlson, Carl 9PP';'""}.'^'J' ^• 

Christensen. M. Ovist. Ost 

Christiansen, Eigil OU^n, Hagbart 

Christenson. H. S L'f^"'pS?I- 

Dibble P W Olsen, Pete 

Eugene. John Oj^^". G<^°>Sfe A. 
Emanuelsen, A. -«61X !!""'r.T.; a 

iricksL"A 'j^'^ o!slo"A.''Johtnnes 

Flpi.hpr Biilv- ■ Passon. Bruno 

FfsVe- n'n^ Peachman. Geo. 

Fritflieim R Person. Fritz 

F?anls"n"- N^' -562 ||?|„T\C-.Jlbo-"^"^ 

8;;if.^^r"L."ivr"^ I S"n i?''" 

Gunwalds, G. E^^^h^ v 

Gustafson. John ^|[^Jren kudolf 
Petersen. Oscar 
Pederson. H. S. 
-1907 

Ilogstrom. A. Peterson. A. K 

Herkman. Fred Persson. Hj -1230 

Hedlund, Arvid S«"«^"°"v^''?nio 

Haltnes. Magnus Petersen C. -1092 

Hansen. H. -2060 g^^''"^"'l°Ji'*VT.^- ., 

Heide. Tom Petersen, M. (Pack- 

Hjelt. Nick -n^^^^T, , 

lliUig. Albert S"?"'. ^"""'t w 

HelnTar. O. (Pack- Robsharn. J W 

„,,„! Raymond. J. 



Gronvold. Peter 
Gustafson. Johan 
Gutman, E. 
Henriksen. Albert 



Rodgers. Charles 
Rokow. Stefan 
Strom. Oscar 



Hansen, Carl 

Harris. John B. 

Hilke, Carl „ „„„ •«» 

Hansen. Peter K. S?I!r,^^"w*:l„„n 

T3..„„„i| p. bievers. Herman 

Hansen L -794 Sorensen, Ing. 

Hansen' Hans S'l'les. Everett 

HM«hv TMrJ^ Shetenz, Hans 

Isaackken Kristen Sorensen. C. -1607 

R^^<son Cnstfiv Scott, B. G. -2041 

InKcbretsen, O. -125 %f^%^^^^- P"?J''^ 

John, Robert I iFS ;„h' ^^ 

Johansen. C .M. -1593|-|^h.„J^°hn^thur 



Janscliewitz. J. 



Sorensen, James 



•J°L"l"f"°;?- 4- -'"■* Sunde Albert 



Janson. G. W 



Saarlnen. H. 



Johansen. Herlut ptephan M 
Johnstadt. J. S. Samson.' Kristian 

.{ohnsen. A. G. Svensen. G. -1579 

Joliansson A. -20a0 gchlosser. L, 
Jensen, l,ill 
Jolinson, G. B. 
Jellinss, R. V. 
Johansen. J. -146 
Jobsen. Ch. 
Janson, Julius 



Sjostrom. Gus 
Schutte. Richard 
Strom. C. -1648 
Sholl. F. K. 
Scarabosia. M. 



Kinsey. W. A. -207 
Kolkih, Fred 
Kopp, Franz 
Kustel. Victor 
Keilman. Joe 
Koso. Pete 
Kusik. M. 
Kleishman, F. 
Kallas, Alex. 
Kristensen. Jens 
Kallas. M. 
Larsen. Martin 
Larson, Jack 
Lindegard. John 



Smith. M. 
Schluter. Paul 
Schwanewede, G. 
Tillman, A, E. 
Thomas, Paul 
Thor, Walno 
Tetter, Anton 
Tufte, A. Paulsen 
Tuominen, Alfred 
Touanne. Walter 
Utby. Carl 
Vongehr, Ed. 
Wiehell. E. A. 
Wiljanen, W. W. 



Lewis. George H. S ''?""''5; Charles 

Larsen, Klaus L. Wrig. Ferdinand 

Leith, Chas. .Wychgel, J. 

Louis, Mjchael Werner. Henry 

Larsen. Chris. T. Wallace. Luke 

Larsen. Christian Wileinsen. H. 

Lange. Freidrich Youngren, E. 

Lyche. Harris Zorning, Arthur 

Lang. Gust. Zornow. Herbert 



When Drinking Beer 
See tliat tliis Label is 
on the Keg or Bottle 




ALL LOS ANGELES BEER 
IS UNFAIR 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The following enrollments at San Francisco 
have been announced: Schooner Dora, C. H. 
Robinson, master; steamer Pike County, T. G. 
Krohncke, master. 

Otto J. Sundman has been appointed master of 
the steamer Lindauer, vice Andrew Andersen. 
The schooner Albertine, A. F. Owen, master, was 
enrolled at San Francisco on September 15. 

Gold bullion va-lued at $57,500 on the steamship 
Humboldt, was stolen in transit from Fairbanks 
to Alaska, and lead substituted in the strong box 
that had contained it. No clue has been found 
to the robber. 

John . Jacobson, a seaman on the steamer 
Marshfield, fell into the hold of that vessel at San 
Francisco on September 8 and sustained an in- 
jury to his right eye, which will destroy the 
sight, and a possible fracture of the skull. 

A Juneau dispatch says the Active, one of the 
largest fishing schooners operating in Alaska, was 
wrecked and probably lost near Yakutat recently. 
The crew are believed to have escaped. The Ac- 
tive was commanded by Captain Campbell of 
Juneau. 

The following change of masters and enroll- 
ment were recorded at the San Francisco Cus- 
tom-house on September 17: Change of master, 
steamer Four Sisters, A. J. Hansen, vice D. S. 
Larkin. J. G. Trapp was enrolled as master of 
the steamer Defiance. 

Parrott & Co. in the United States District 
Court at San Francisco on September 12 libeled 
the British bark Dolbadarn, a recent arrival from 
Rotterdam, for $1962. The complainants allege 
that a cargo of steel plates and cement, consigned 
to them, was damaged to the amount asked for. 

Arrangements have been completed for one of 
the Spreckels tugs to tow the dredge under con- 
struction at St. John's, Portland, to Honolulu. 
The dredge is being built for a firm in San Fran- 
cisco which has taken a contract for deepening 
the channel in the vicinity of Pearl Harbor. 

The Canadian Pacific steamship Princess May, 
which grounded on the rocks of Sentinel Island 
early on the morning of August 5, was launched 
from the rocks on September 3 and was brought 
to Juneau by the tug Jollifife on the 4th. The 
Princess May will be taken to Esquimault for 
repairs. 

The American ships St. Francis and St. Nicho- 
las arrived at Astoria on September 10 from the 
Nushagak River, Alaska, with the salmon packs 
of the Alaska Fishermen's Packing Company and 
the Columbia River Packers' Association. They 
report pleasant and uneventful passages from the 
North, with all on board well and no accidents. 

United States Marshal Elliott at San Francisco 
on September 8 auctioned off the wreck of the 
steam-schooner Phoenix, under a libel brought 
in the United States District Court for salvage. 
Charles T. Foster was the highest bidder at $2000 
for the hull and machinery. The water-soaked 
cargo, consisting of tanbark, tanbark extract and 
mohair, was sold in small lots to various pur- 
chasers, realizing $306. 

Confirming the rumors that the Puget Sound 
codfish industry is to be placed on a more organ- 
ized basis than ever before, C. P. Overton, vice- 
president and mana,ger of the Union Fish Com- 
pany, of San Francisco, by which a combination 
of the Coast codfishing interests was formed, has 
given out the official statement of the plans of his 
association. Overton declares the consolidation 
was not brought about or financed by the Eastern 
codfish trust. 

The Alaska Steamship Company has contracted 
with the United Wireless Telegraph Company 
for the equipment of the steamer La Touche with 
a one-kilowatt plant. The Alaska Steamship 
Company at the present time has the following 
ships equipped with this system: Victoria, North- 
western, Dolphin, Seward, Olympia and Jefferson. 
The steamship Yucatan of the same line was 
equipped with the system at the time of the dis- 
aster to that vessel. 

The wrecking schooner Greenwood of the 
VVhitelaw Wrecking Company retjurned to San 
Francisco on September 17 from Monterey, 
where the wrecked steam schooner Majestic is 
being stripped. The Greenwood brought up a lot 
of gear, including spars, boats, tackle and oars. 
Captain Whitelaw is at the scene of the wreck 
supervising the removal of the boilers and en- 
gines. The latter will be towed up by the Green- 
wood on the barge Reliable. 

The total pack of the sockeye salmon in British 
Columbia this season aggregated 543,525 cases, 
according to final figures that have just been an- 
nounced. Last season, which was a "fat" year, 
the pack aggregated 967,920 cases; 1908. 542,698 
cases; 1907, 547,459 cases; 1906, 629,460 cases. The 
combined pack of Puget Sound and British 
Columbia this season aggregated 816,132 cases 
of all descriptions, compared with 1,870,185 cases 
last year. 

A new island was added to the Bogoslof group, 
in the Aleutian Channel, at the same time that 
the towns of Unalaska and Dutch Harbor were 
shaken by nn earthquake on September 1. The 
island rose from deep water at a point where a 



sounding by the geological survey last year 
showed seventy fathoms. The island is in the 
form of a great rounded hill, very close to Perry 
Peak, the island that rose last year, and was dis- 
covered by officers of the revenue-cutter Perry. 

The Pacific Mail Steamship Company has an- 
nounced an express freight service between San 
Francisco and New York, via Panama, to begin 
on September 30, which, it is asserted, should 
give a twenty-day service, if the Eastern connec- 
tions make the time that they have promised. In 
any event the Pacific Mail guarantees the time 
of thirteen days between San Francisco and Bal- 
boa, the port of Ancon, with sailings every fifteen 
days. 

The codfishing schooner W. H. Dimond, Cap- 
tain Dahloff, twenty-nine days from Bristol Bay, 
arrived at San Francisco on September 16, bring- 
ing 150,000 codfish. Captain Dahloff reported 
that on August 19 in Bristol Bay he spoke the 
barkentine Fremont with 112,000 fish. She was 
to have sailed for Eagle Harbor on August 29. 
On August 28 in Unimak Pass the Dimond saw 
the schooner Prosper with salmon from Bristol 
Bay for San Francisco. 

With Captain Dunham sick in his berth, where 
he had been confined for seventy-five days suf- 
fering from dropsy, and having passed through a 
terrible experience off Cape Horn, the American 
ship Astral, owned by the Standard Oil Company, 
arrived at San Francisco on September 16, 154 
days from New York. Negotiations for the trans- 
fer of the Astral, which have been going on for 
some months between the Standard Oil and the 
Alaska Packers' Association, it is reported will 
result in the Astral joining the big fleet of the 
salmon concern. 

The following changes of masters and en- 
rollments were recorded at the San Francisco 
Custom-house on September 12; Changes of 
masters — Steamer Mary C, Frank Rocca, vice W. 
J. Emrick; steamer Sea Prince, L. Langren, vice 
H. P. Marshall; steamer Margarita, J. J. Barros, 
vice G. J. Ryan; steamer Sentinel, C. A. Lau- 
ritzen, vice A. M. Clotfelder; schooner Hermine 
Blum, Philip Herman, vice I. Isakson; steamer 
Elaine, Henry Allender, vice F. C. Franks. En- 
rollments — W. F. Whale, steamer Champion; 
Peter Gunderson, steamer Star of Holland. 

Bringing the first batch of returning cannery 
hands, the Alaska Packers' steam tender Kvichak, 
Captain Larson, arrived at San Francisco on Sep- 
tember 5, after an uneventful run of eleven days 
nine hours from Naknek. Captain Larson report- 
ed that he towed the ship Bohemia through 
Unimak Pass and also brought news, of the fol- 
lowing sailings out of the Pass: Ships Star of 
England and Star of Finland, August 13; ship 
L. J. Morse, August 14; ships Star of Peru and 
Tacoma, August 24, and ship Star of Italy, Aug- 
ust 25. 

The steamers Miowera — now Maitai — and Ao- 
rangi, two pioneers of the Canadian-Australian 
line, which are to be put in service between New 
Zealand and San Francisco, by way of the South 
Sea Islands, are being overhauled at Wellington. 
The first steamer to leave San Francisco will be 
the Aorangi, scheduled to depart November 16. 
The Aorangi will leave Wellington for the Golden 
Gate on October 22, calling at Auckland, Papeete 
and Raratonga en route. The Aorangi is a 
steamer of 4268 tons register, and is 389 feet long, 
with good passenger accommodations. 

With 146,767 codfish, the schooner City of 
Papeete arrived at San Francisco on September 
15, fifteen days from Beliring Sea. It is under- 
stood that this season's codfish catch falls below 
that of last year. Previous to August 16 the 
Papeete spoke the barkentine Fremont with 
101,000 fish; schooner Joseph Russ, 140,000 fish; 
schooner Fanny Dutard, 146,000 fish; schooner 
Vega, 146,000 fish; schooner Alice, 100,000 fish. 
The schooners belong to the Seattle fleet. Both 
the Russ and the Dutard have arrived home. 
Captain Pettersen reported speaking the ship 
Tacoma on September 7 in latitude 44 49 north, 
142 30 west. 

An indication that the Nippon Yusen Kaisha 
steamship line has withdrawn from the trans- 
Pacific conference and will start war on trans- 
Pacific business was given on Septeniber 12, when 
the announcement of a general cut in passenger 
rates was made. First-class rate between the 
Sound and Yokohama, formerly $175, has been 
reduced to $125 for single trips, and round-trip 
rates have been cut from $265 to $187.50. Other 
rates have been reduced in proportion, excepting 
steerage, which remains at $43.50. Althou.gh no 
announcement was made about freight rates, it is 
believed that this will follow. Rates quoted by 
the Nippon company are lower than those of any 
other transpacific company excepting the Osaka 
Shoshen Kaisha, which handles little passenger 
business. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims of 
all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, California St., near 
Montgomery. Telephones, Kearny 394; Home, 
C 3832. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN^S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRA21ER, Secretary-Treasurer, 
1% Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFII^IATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., I'/sA Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Pore St. 
NEW YORK, N. T., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa„ 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 221 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 674 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies: 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 
ERIE, Pa., 328 German St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 

CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 316 W. Kinzie St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, O., 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, O., 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, O., Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY,. Mich., 208 Fraser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 242 South Water St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 317 Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency: 
CONNEAUT. O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
EstablUhed in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRBNBERG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 
One year, by mall - $2.00 1 Six months 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



$1.00 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street. San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper,' and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURN.M- is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 21. 1910. 



VOLUME XXIV. 



With this is.siic the Journal begin.s a new 
volume — the twenty-fourth. The incident is 
noteworthy as an occasion for mutual con- 
gratulation on the part of the paper and its 
readers and business associates. We congrat- 
ulate our readers and advertisers upon their 
intelligence and acumen, as manifested by 
their use of the Journal's columns, and the 
latter will, we feel sure, congratulate us upon 
our own use of the opportunity to get out a 
good paper. We renew the pledge made in 
these columns every year of the Journal's 
existence (and never broken, so far as we 
know) to keep the paper true to her course as 
"a Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Sea- 
men ; our aim : the Brotherhood of the Sea ; 
our motto : Justice by Organization" ! 



PICKETING ENJOINED. 



The great strike of cloakmakers in New 
York ended on the 2d inst., after a struggle 
lasting nearly two months. The terms of set- 
tlement constitute a substantial, and practically 
a complete victory for the strikers. The em- 
ployers recognize the "union shop" and "de- 
clare their belief in the union, and that all who 
desire its benefits should share its burdens." 
This, in itself, is as concise a statement of the 
"union shop" principle as could well be asked. 
It is also agreed that the hours and wages 
asked by the strikers shall be conceded, and 
that piecework rates shall be settled by a com- 
mittee representing each shop. The employers 
also grant the right of the workers to appoint 
a "shop delegate," who shall represent them in 
dealing with individual employers. These re- 
sults are well worth the hardships and self- 
sacrifice endured by the strikers, and demon- 
strate again the power of organization intelli- 
gently directed in a good cause. 

Apart from the successful ending of the 
cloakiTiakers' strike, the most important feature 
of that event is the injunction issued by Jus- 
tice GofT, of the New York Supreme Court, 
in which he characterized the strike and the 
incidental picketing as a "common-law, civil 
conspiracy." In part the opinion reads: 

What the employers may not do, the workmen 



may not do. If a combination of one to refuse 
employment, except on condition of joining a 
union, be against public policy, a combination of 
the others to cause refusal of employment, except 
on condition of joining a union, is alike against 
public policy. 

This decision has been widely commented 
upon, favorably and unfavorably. The ma- 
jority of the comment seems to be against the 
decision of Justice Goff. The New York 
Evening Post, a paper by no means prejudiced 
in favor of organized labor, says : 

Justice Goflf's injunction against the striking 
cloakmakers is startlingly sweeping in its terms. 
In effect, it prohibits concerted action of any kind 
by the strikers, other than that of assembling in 
public. It prohibits picketing, even when peace- 
fully carried on, a right thoroughly recognized in 
the English courts, and, the general impression 
runs, in our own courts as well. During the re- 
cent strike of the women shirtwaist strikers, this 
principle was tested with apparent thoroughness. 
Justice Goflf's decision embodies rather strange 
law, and certainly very poor policy. One need not 
be a sympathizer with trade-union policy as it 
reveals itself to-day in order to see that the latest 
injunction, if generally upheld, would seriously 
cripple such defensive powers as legitimately be- 
long to organized labor. 

Other papers express similar views, indi- 
cating a widespread dissent from the position 
assumed by the court. The best analysis of 
the injunction against the striking cloakmakers 
that has appeared in print is that of The Pub- 
lic, of Chicago, which, under the caption, 
"Picketing is Illegal," says: 

So holds Judge GofT of New York, who has 
issued an injunction against striking cloak 
makers. He decides that the strike is against 
public policy because it is to enforce the rule of 
"Closed Shop" — that is, the strikers, members of 
a labor organization, refuse to work in the same 
establishment with non-members of that organi- 
zation. .\nd this regardless of any question of 
violence; for Judge Goflf, as reported in the dis- 
patches, calls their mere refusal in concert a con- 
spiracy. 

Unless Judge Goflf has altered his attitude 
toward organized labor since coming to the 
bench, it must be that his decision is not rep- 
resentative of himself but is necessitated by the 
laws he is sworn to apply to the controversies 
that come before him as a judge. But what ab- 
surdly illogical law! May not any individual re- 
fuse to work with or for any other individual, 
and for any reason? No one will deny it. Then 
why may not two or more refuse in concert? 
Why does the refusal of one person to work in 
an "Open Shop" become a crime only when oth- 
ers join him? There is but one reason, there 
can be but one. It is that a solitary refusal would 
be ineflfective in turning the "Open Shop" into a 
"Closed Shop"; whereas concerted action might 
operate effectively. In other words, the law is 
for the protection of employers against effective 
trade-unionism. For the trade-union that must 
not refuse, as a union, to work w-ith non-union- 
ists, is as ineffective as a farm hand on a fence 
twiddling his thumbs. 

But this law, please observe, is one-sided. It 
does not apply to employers — not practically, 
whether theoretically or not, — whereas it applies 
practically as well as theoretically to working- 
men. Employers are corporations whose man- 
agers, by refusing to employ organized working- 
men, bring to bear against trade-unions the in- 
fluence of many stockholders with much money, 
but are nevertheless not conspirators. Could 
anything be more trashy in the whole realm of 
jurisprudence than laws which allow numerous 
persons to confederate as a business corporation 
and refuse employment to trade-unionists, yet re- 
gard as conspirators trade-unionists who refuse 
to work for employers of non-unionists? 

And there is a deeper consideration. The very 
laws which (if Judge Goflf interprets them aright) 
prevent organized workingmen from concertedly 
refusing to work for hostile employers, yet allow 
hostile employers concertedly to refuse to employ 
organized workingmen, laws which at the same 
time hypocritically profess to favor organizations 
of workingmen "to better their condition" — those 
very laws strictly maintain, in the interest of non- 
working classes and against all workingmen, the 
one "Closed Shop" which causes the unfair labor 
conditions out of which the demand of organized 
labor for secondary "Closed Shops" springs. .-\s 
we have written at large of this before, it is 
enough to say here that laws which authorize 
injunctions against the "Closed Shop" principle 
when workingmen appeal to that principle, 
should be revised with a view to repealing the 
"Closed Shop" principle with reference to mon- 
opoly of the earth. What but a "Closed Shop" 
in the most destructive sense to all labor, is that 
monopoly of land which makes workingmen beg- 
gars of employers and competitors against one 
another for employment? 

The victory of the cloakmakers is the more 

gratifying in view of the obstacles placed in 



their way by the courts, proving, as it does, 
that such obstacles can not of themselves frus- 
trate justice when the latter is intelligently 
and unitedly insisted upon. 



INCIDENT OF LABOR DAY. 



Labor Day in Chicago was celebrated by a 
great parade, followed by literary exercises in 
keeping with the occasion. During the parade 
an incident occurred which was not on the 
programme, and therefore all the more signifi- 
cant. A correspondent in Chicago thus de- 
scribes the aflFair: 

During the Labor Day parade at South Chicago 
an incident took place which served to illustrate 
the contempt of the organized workers for the 
Lake Carriers, and also caused some laughter and 
amusement. 

The line of march down 92nd street necessi- 
tated that the parade pass the Lake Carriers' As- 
sncintion scab shipping-office. .\s the marchers 
filed by the place flags and banners were furled, 
and the band immediately following the Seamen's 
division suddenly halted directly in front of tlie 
scab office and began playing a most mournful 
funeral dirge. Band after band followed this ex- 
ample, the local citizens cheering and applauding 
heartily. The laughter of the crowd was too 
much for even the scab shipping-masters and they 
cjuickly "beat it" into the inner darkness of the 
notorious den. 

The members of the International Seamen's 
Union of America were well represented in the 
parade and marched with banners, flags and sev- 
eral good, plain strike signs. Secretary-Treasurer 
Frazier and Vice-President Olander, of the Inter- 
national Union, were both in line. 

The labor movement of Chicago is behind 
the Lake seamen in their struggle for the 
maintenance of organization among the sea- 
faring craft on the great inland waters. So 
also are all good citizens who place manhood 
above money in the scheme of human life. 
With such backing, the Lake seamen are 
bound to win, the more surely as the Lake 
seamen themselves are determined to keep up 
the fight until victory perches upon their ban- 
ners. 



To those who assert that the chief objec- 
tion to Asiatic labor is economic rather than 
racial, we would suggest just one question : 
Were the Asiatic a "dear" man rather than 
a "cheap" man, would he be any less ob- 
jectionable? Of course, it may be said that 
were the Asiatic a "dear" man he would not 
be encouraged to come to the United States. 
Quite true, perhaps. But an honest answer 
to the question as stated will show that the 
Asiatic would be none the less objectionable 
(because none the less an Asiatic), were his 
economic standard ten times higher than it 
really is. On the contrary, the higher the 
economic standard, the more pronounced 
the racial objection. Again, economic con- 
ditions may be changed, but racial character- 
istics persist indefinitely. Let us take our 
stand on bedrock, not on sand ! 



Read the Convention Call of the American 
Federation of Labor, published in another col- 
umn. Every affiliated organization should 
make a strong effort to send its full quota of 
representatives to the convention, in order 
that the fullest expression of opinion may be 
had and the best judgment reached. 



San Francisco is known everywhere as a 
"good card town"; it should also be known as 
a "good union town." In other words, San 
Francisco should be known as a town in which 
every man who carries a card also practices 
the principles for which the card stands. De- 
mand the union label ! 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



CONVENTION CALL. 

Labor Omnia Vincit. 



American Federation of Labor. 

Headquarters, 801-809 G Street N. W., 

Washington, D. C, Sept. 10, 1910. 
To All Affiliated Unions, Greeting: 

You are hereby advised that, in pursuance 
to the Constitution of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, the Thirtieth Annual Con- 
vention of the- American Federation of 
Labor will be held at Northwest Turn and 
Liederkranz Hall, St. Louis, Missouri, be- 
ginning 10 o'clock Monday morning, No- 
vember 14, 1910, and will continue in ses- 
sion from day to day until the business of 
the Convention has been completed. 

Representation. 

Representation in the Convention will be 
on the following basis : From National or 
International Unions, for less than 4000 
members, one delegate ; 4000 or more, two 
delegates ; 8000 or more, three delegates ; 
16,000 or more, four delegates; 32,000 or 
more, five delegates; 64,000 or. more, six 
delegates ; 128,000 or more, seven delegates, 
and so on ; and from Central Bodies and 
State Federations, and from local trade 
unions not having a National or Inter- 
national Union, and from Federal Labor 
Unions, one delegate. 

Organizations to be entitled to represen- 
tation must have obtained a certificate of 
affiliation (charter) at least one month prior 
to the Convention; and no person will be 
recognized as a delegate who is not a mem- 
ber in good standing of the organization he 
is elected to represent. 

Only bona fide wage workers, who are not 
members of, or eligible to membership in 
other trade unions, are eligible as delegates 
from Federal Labor Unions. 

Delegates must be selected at least two 
weeks previous to the Convention, and their 
names forwarded to the Secretary of the 
American Federation of Labor immediately 
after their election. 

Delegates are not entitled to seats in the 
Convention unless the tax of their organiza- 
tions has been paid in full to September 30, 
1910. 

It is, of course, entirely unnecessary here 
to enumerate the imminent important sub- 
jects with which our forthcoming Conven- 
tion will concern itself, but the reminder is 
not at all amiss that every effort must be 
made to broaden the field and means for the 
organization of the yet unorganized workers, 
to strive more efifectually than ever to bring 
about a better day in the lives and homes 
of the toilers, to defend and maintain by 
every honorable means in our power the 
right to organize for our common defense 
and advancement, and to assert at any risk 
the freedom of speech and of the press and 
the equal rights before the law of every 
worker with every other -citizen. These and 
other great questions of equal importance 
will, of necessity, occupy the attention of 
the St. Louis Convention. 

Therefore the importance of our organ- 
izations and our movement, the duty of the 
hour and for the future, demand that every 
organization entitled to representation shall 
send its full quota of delegates to the St. 
Louis Convention, November 14, 1910. 

Do not allow favoritism to influence you 
in selecting your delegates. Be fully repre- 
sented. 



Be represented by your ablest, best, most 
experienced and faithful members. 

Credentials. 

Credentials in duplicate are forwarded to 
all affiliated unions. The original credential 
must be given to the delegate-elect and the 
duplicate forwarded to the American Fed- 
eration of Labor office, 801-809 G street 
Northwest, Washington, D. C. 

The Committee on Credentials will meet 
at the headquarters of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor six days previous to the 
opening of the Convention, and will report 
immediately upon the opening thereof at 
St. Louis, hence secretaries will observe the 
necessity of mailing the duplicate creden- 
tials of their respective delegates at the 
earliest possible moment to Washington, 
D. C. 

Grievances. 

Under the law no grievance can be con- 
sidered by the Convention that has been 
decided by a previous Convention, except 
upon the recommendation of the Executive 
Council, nor will any grievance be consid- 
ered where the parties thereto have not 
previously held conference and attempted to 
adjust the same themselves. 

Railroad Rates. 

Application was filed for reduced rates for 
the benefit of the delegates attending the 
Convention, but the Central Passenger As- 
sociation, in whose territory St. Louis is 
located, refused the application. 

Reservations in any of the hotels can be 
made by addressing the Secretary of the 
Convention Committee, David Kreyling, 
353.S Pine street, St. Louis, Mo. 

Headquarters of the Executive Council 
will be at the Planters Hotel. 

Delegates should notify Secretary David 
Kreyling of the time of their arrival at St. 
Louis, and over which road they will travel. 

If there be any further information re- 
garding the Convention, or the arrange- 
ments for the convenience of the delegates, 
it will be communicated in a later circular, 
or through the American Federationist. 

SAMUEL GOMPERS, President. 
Attest : 

FRANK MORRISON, Secretary. 

James Duncan, First Vice-'President. 

John Mitchell, Second Vice-President. 

James O'Connell, Third Vice-President. 

D. A. Hayes, Fourth Vice-President. 

Wm. D. Huber, Fifth Vice-President. 

Jos. F. Valentine, Sixth Vice-President. 

John R. Alpine, Seventh Vice-President. 

H. B. Perham, Eighth Vice-President. 

John B. Lennon, Treasurer. 
Executive Council American Federation of 

Labor. 



FLOATING DRUG STORES. 



The sale" of western medicines in the 
Malay peninsula should find impetus under 
the new system of distribution. A dispen- 
sary boat- — an ordinary house boat, with a 
crew to pole upstream and paddle down- 
stream — will be equipped with western 
medicines and cruise on the Pahang river 
in charge of a Malay "dresser." It will also 
facilitate the free distribution of quinine to 
the natives, which work has hitherto been 
accomplished through the agency of police 
stations and vernacular school teachers. 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Sept. 19, 1910. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Geo. Stcdman presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping medium. Nominations were 
made for delegates to the Detroit convention of 
International Seamen's Union of .America. 

E. ELLISON, Secretary pro tern. 
44-46 East St. Pacific Phone Kearny 2228. 
Home Phone J 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 15, 1910. 
Situation fair. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
122 Alexander St. P. O. Box 136S. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 12, 1910. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping fair; 
prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 12, 1910. 
Shipping medium; prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 12, 1910. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping and pros- 
pects very poor. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
2291^ Water St. P. O. Box 4S. Tel. Main 1412. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 12, 1910. 
Shipping- slightly improved; prospects poor. 

HARRY COOK, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. 225. 



Portland, Ore., Agency, Sept. 12, 1910. 
Shipping dull; strike situation the same. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 12, 1910. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

JOHN W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 12, 1910. 
Shipping fairly good; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. Main 662. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



For fair products of all kinds patronize 
the Journal's advertisers. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 15, 1910. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m,, Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping fair. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 9. 1910. 
No meeting. Shipping slow. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
P. O. Box 1335. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 12, 1910, 
No meeting. Shipping slow; plenty of cooks 

ashore. 

ED. BARRY, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, Sept. 12, 1910. 
.Strike situation unchanged. 

ALEX. McKECHNIE, Sec'y pro tem. 
674 West Madison St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Sept. 13, 1910. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary pro tem. 
1^2 A Lewis Street. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




ON THE GREAT LAKES. 



(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unions.) 




THIRTY DIE ON CARFERRY. 



The Dead. 

Peter Kilty of Ludington, captain. 

Joseph Brezinski, mate, of Manitowoc. 

W. H. Brown, second mate, of Ludington. 

S. F. Sczepanek, pur.ser, 52 Gold street, 
Worcester, Mass. 

E. R. Leedham, chief engineer, of Luding- 
ton. 

Chalmcr Rosencranz, assistant engineer, 
of Northport, Mich. 

Paul Rcnnere, second assistant engineer, 
of Ludington. 

A. J. Mack, steward, Westfield, N. Y. 

W. H. Cummins, Webster and Halsted 
street, Chicago. 

John Schraufuagl, cook, Milwaukee. 

N. L. Bertrand, passenger, Ludington. 

Michael Haythaler, fireman, Forestville, 
Mich. 

Samuel Bouschio, fireman. River Bour- 
geois, N. S. 

W. Parker, fireman. Marine City. 

Mrs. Marion Turner, cabin maid, Luding- 
ton. 

Peter Hire, watchman, Ludington. 

Ole Bakken, wheelman, Ludington. 

Joseph Marion, scrubber, Ludington. 

Frank Warner (Chicago Frank), porter, 
Chicago. 

Jacobson, seaman, residence unknown. 

Charles Jensen, oiler, Ludington. 

Joe Peterson, watchman, steamer No. 17. 

Jacob Jacobson, scrubber, steamer No. 17, 
Ludington. 

Unknown oiler, Norwegian. 

Unknown fireman. 

Unknown lookout. 

Two stowaways, Tom Kelley and brother, 
Detroit. 

Ludington, Mich., Sept. 9. — Thirty lives 
were lost to-day when the Pere Marquette 
carferry No. 18, bound from Ludington to 
Milwaukee, went to the bottom of Lake 
Michigan half way across the Lake. 

The dead include Captain Peter Kilty of 
Ludington, S. F. Sczepanek of Chicago, 
purser and wireless operator, whose signals 
of distress brought assistance to the sink- 
ing steamer, and two members of the crew 
of Carferry No. 17, who lost their lives in 
an effort to rescue the crew of No. 18. Eli 
Colbean of Saginaw, Mich., a member of 
the crew of No. 18, w^ould make a thirty- 
first victim, but it is believed that he was 
not on board when No. 18 set out from here 
last night on her fatal trip. 

The steamship company issued a list of 
thirty-five names of survivors of the wreck, 
all members of the crew, and most of whom 
were brought here to-night on Pere Mar- 
quette carferry No. 17. Eight bodies were 
recovered, six being brought here on car- 
ferry No. 17, and two being taken to Mil- 
waukee on carferry No. 20. The bodies 
brought here were those of Captain Kilty, 
Purser Sczepanek, Steward Mack, W. H. 
Cummins, N. L. Bertrand and Mrs. Marion 
Turner. One of the bodies taken to Mil- 
waukee was that of Mate Joseph Brezinski. 
The other was reported to be that of Joseph 
Koch, but as there is a James Koob in the 
list of rescued some doubt has arisen in 
regard to the second body taken to Mil- 



waukee. Koob does not appear in the 
steamship company's list of dead. 

The cause of the disaster is enveloped in 
mystery. F. F. Potvin, cabin watch, said 
that the boat w^as very low at the stern 
when the first alarm was given. He said 
they pushed twenty-nine railroad cars into 
the lake to ease the vessel, but without avail. 
Seymour Cochrane of Chicago, another sur- 
vivor, said he was reading a magazine in 
his berth when a cabin boy rapped on his 
door about 4:30 a. m. and shouted that the 
boat was sinking. 

Cochrane floated on a cal)in door until 
picked up by No. 17. The purser had given 
him $1000 which was due Cochrane's em- 
ployers after they had delivered the boat to 
the Pere Marquette Railroad Company, 
they having leased her all summer, but 
Cochrane could not load himself down with 
the coin and tied the money to the steamer's 
rail as the boat went down. 

Many of the lifeboats were stove in by 
wreckage tumbling in every direction on 
the tossing sea, the occupants of the small 
boats being thrown into the water and 
many of them drowned. 

"Carferry No. 18 sinking — help," was the 
C. Q. D. wireless message that brought the 
first news of the disaster to this city about 
.^ a. m. to-day. The flash was repeated con- 
tinuously for nearly an hour, but was un- 
signed. At 7:30 a. m. Superintendent Mer- 
cereau of the Pere Marquette carferry line 
received a wireless from carferrj^ No. 17 
stating that No. 18 sank at 7 o'clock. 

The carferry steamer Pere Marquette No. 
18, which was lost in Lake Michigan Sep- 
tember 9, was built at the old Globe yard, 
Cleveland, in 1902. She was 338 feet keel, 
56 feet beam and 20 feet deep and had 
capacity for thirty cars. 

The steamer was not insured for her full 
value, but the loss in the vessel will cost the 
underwriters about $300,000. She was in- 
sured in American and foreign companies 
through New York and Boston agents. 



WESTERN CANADIAN GRAIN CROP. 



The Manitoba Free Press prints the fol- 
lowing figures on the western Canadian 
crop : 

Bushels. 

Wheat 101,736,413 

Oats 108,310,090 

Barley 7,130,770 

Flax 7,729,150 

Total 224,906,423 

This is a great deal better than expected, 
as the total of old grains is as good as last 
year although showing a decrease of about 
20,000,000 bushels in wheat compared with 
1909. The harvesting weather has been 
ideal, and an early movement from the head 
of the Lakes is looked for. 



Removal of the wreck of the steamer 
Oscar T. Flint, sunk oflF Alpena in Thun- 
der Bay, has been greatly delayed by rough 
weather. It is now cleared away to a depth 
that renders it no longer a menace. 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



WAITING FOR GRAIN. 



Vessel agents report some improvement 
in the demand for grain tonnage down the 
Lakes. G. A. Tomlinson, the Duluth own- 
er, said that while the demand is not very 
good his line is loading about an average 
of a boat a day. The Sultana, of the Tom- 
linson line, which has been laid up at Du- 
luth for the past three weeks, has been char- 
tered for the grain trade and is now load- 
ing a cargo of about 200,000 bushels for 
shipment to Buffalo. 

Threshing is now general over practically 
the entire Northwest and Canada and in 
many places from 50 to 75 per cent, has 
been threshed. The Duluth receipts are 
slowly gaining. 

The heavy movement of grain, however, 
does not start much before the middle of 
October and although it will be slightly ear- 
lier this season, it is not expected the early 
harvests will make a great change in the 
demand for tonnage. 

Cleveland vesselowners expect some help 
from the grain traffic about the latter part 
of September, and a gradual improvement 
in the situation thereafter. 



KICK FROM CANADA. 



Protests against the construction of the 
proposed dam, connecting the west side of 
Bois Blanc Island and the Livingstone 
Channel, were unfolded before William 
Pugley, Canada's Minister of Public Works, 
by citizens of Amherstberg. As outlined by 
Colonel C. McD. Townsend. federal engi- 
neer of Detroit, the proposed dam is to off- 
set the enlargement of the outlet of the 
Detroit River by channel improvements and 
prevent reduction of Upper Lake levels. 
The Canadian Government was asked to 
permit its erection in Canadian waters. 

The Amherstburg people argued that the 
dam would cut off the entire west side of 
Bois Blanc Island and would result in ice 
sweeping away Amherstburg docks. 

The delegation sought to impress on Mr. 
Pugley also the importance of dredging the 
river between Amherstburg and the deep- 
ened channel. 

A strong plea was made also for the op- 
ening of Fighting Island Channel to relieve 
the congestion of vessel traffic opposite 
Wyandotte. 



C. W. Post, the sawdust peddler of Bat- 
tle Creek, attempted to get a Red Oak (la.) 
judge to grant an injunction against the 
Buck's Stove and Range Company's union- 
shop settlement. He shrieks through the 
columns of the press about organized labor 
"interfering with the business of manufac- 
turers and other employers." What does 
Mr. Post call his own meddling with the 
Buck's Stove Company's business? 

The miners of Illinois have won their 
strike; the cloak makers of New York have 
won their strike ; the Buck's Stove and 
Range Company's employes have won their 
strike. The Seamen of the Lakes are go- 
ing to win their strike ! 

W. H. Jenkins. 

Conneaut, O. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



TORRENT A FINE TUG. 



The new steel firetug Torrent, recently 
finished at the Lorain yards of the Ameri- 
can Shipbuilding Company for the Duluth 
& Iron Range Railway, is a duplicate of 
the firetug McGonagle built at Lorain last 
year. The Torrent is 120 feet long, 28-foot 
beam. She has on board two pumps of 
6,000 gallons per minute capacity. The 
pressure is 150 pounds single and 300 
pounds tandem. She can throw a stream 
400 feet from a 4j^-inch nozzle, and can 
throw 15 streams at once — three from the 
turrets and 12 standard 2^-inch streams. 
She carries a crew of ten. Her speed is 15 
miles an hour, and for general all-around 
classiness she can't be touched by anything 
afloat. Her equipment is right up to the 
minute, including a life-raft of 15 chambers, 
and a life-boat capable of carrying twelve 
persons. 



COOK CHARGES CRUELTY. 



Brutal treatment and neglect after he 
had been burned by flaming grease, are 
charged by E. J. Henry, a young Canadian, 
who was steward on the steamer George 
C. Howe until recently. Henry is now in 
the Detroit Marine Hospital recovering 
from deep burns received when a pot of 
boiling suet took fire and spattered over his 
head, face and arms. 

"I begged the captain to put me ashore 
at Alpena or some other nearby place, but 
he refused," said Henry. "All they did was 
to put peroxide on my burns." Henry is 
twenty-one years of age. As soon as he re- 
covers, he says, he will start suit against 
the owners of the Howe. 



BREAKWATER FOR CONNEAUT. 



Bids were opened recently for construct- 
ing a breakwater, and for dredging at Con- 
neaut harbor, in accordance with plans re- 
cently approved for an enlarged and im- 
proved harbor at that place. The lowest bid 
for breakwater was that of The Edward 
Gillon Dock, Dredge & Construction Com- 
pany, at $1.55 per ton for rock, which will 
be recommended for acceptance. The low- 
est bids for dredging were those of the Great 
Lakes Dredge & Dock Company and Brey- 
mann Bros., both at $1.99 per cubic yard. 
One or the other of these latter bids will 
be recommended for acceptance, Colonel 
Millis says. 



GETTING CHANNEL READY. 



The Government dredging work on Bal- 
lard's reef in the lower Detroit River, con- 
sisting of the removal of shoals and rocks, 
is now under way, the dredge Hercules and 
tug Columbia, of the M. Sullivan Dredging 
Company, starting work last week. The 
Hercules will receive $25 an hour and will 
be at work sixteen hours a day. 

Dredge No. 3 and tug Cooper of the Great 
Lakes Dredge Dock Company, are being 
fitted out and will start work this week, at 
$22.50 an hour. Breymann Bros.' dredge 
No. 3 and tug Breymann are being fitted 
out and will arrive within a few days. These 
dredges will be at work for the next four 
months preparing the channel near Ballard's 
Reef for the opening of the Livingstone 
Channel in the spring of 1912. 



STRIKE 

ON THE GREAT LAKES 



COMRADES: 

The strike of Sailors, Firemen and Cooks 
on the Great Lakes is still on. We appeed 
to all seafaring men to assist us in persuad- 
ing seamen to stay away from the Lakes 
during this strike. 

Any reports that the strike has been set- 
tled are false. 

The Seamen of the Great Lakes are sticking to- 
gether solidly, and will keep up the battle for 
freedom and decent conditions until the fight is 
won. "God Almighty hates a quitter." (So do 
we.) 

Lend a hand, comrades, by inducing seamen to 
stay away from the Lakes while the strike is on. 
Yours fraternally, 

LAKE DISTRICT, 

International Seamen's Union of America. 

STRIKE ON THE GREAT LAKES 
KEEP AWAY! 

OVER 400 FEET LONG. 



The new D. & C. steamer will eclipse 
every other passenger boat on the Great 
Lakes. She will not only be the biggest 
side-wheel passenger boat on fresh water, 
but the biggest passenger boat of any kind 
on the Lakes. She will be sixty feet longer 
than the monster City of Cleveland. 

With this length the new boat will be 
narrower by a couple of feet. She will rise 
no further out of the water because the limit 
was about reached with the Cleveland. 

With her additional length nearly 100 
staterooms can be added and there will be 
much more room for cargo. All the best 
features of the City of Cleveland and a 
number of new ones will appear in the new 
creation, which is now being put on paper 
by Marine Architect Frank E. Kirby. 

The new boat will come out in 1912. She 
will run between Detroit and Buffalo. Her 
name will probably be City of Detroit, al- 
though a competition will likely be ar- 
ranged to settle this. 



SHOALS IN ASHLAND HARBOR. 



Colonel Graham D. Fitch, engineer corps, 
U. S. A., at Duluth, informs the Lake Sur- 
vey ofiice that following the grounding of 
the steamer Wiley M. Egan in the dredged 
channel, a partial examination of the har- 
bor at Ashland, Wis., has disclosed shoals 
and lumps formed since the last survey. 
They He in the northerly side of the chan- 
nel, between red buoys Nos. 2 and 4, having 
a least depth of 13.1 feet or 12.7 at lower 
water. He suggests the shoals probably are 
due to illegal dumping from a private 
dredge. 



SCHOONER DISMASTED. 



A heavy wind swept the west coast of 
Michigan on August 25 but did no great 
damage. The schooner Alice B. Norris of 
Chicago was dismantled on Lake Michigan 
near Whitehall, but declined the assistance 
of the life-saving crew. 

The Graham & Morton steamer Puritan 
which went aground at Holland, was re- 
leased on August 25. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Charles Bourroughs, No. 2745, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by his father. 

Findlay J. McDonald, No. 5499, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by John D. Mc- 
Donald, Highland Park, Mich. 

Comrade Henry Blaschke. Any one 
knowing the above-named comrade please 
communicate with Jno. Rook, Jr., 2564 E. 
55th St., Cleveland. 

Roy Person, No. 12522, L. S. U., is in- 
quired for by his sister, Miss Hazel Person, 
225 Chisholm street, Alpena, Mich. 

William Young, a marine fireman, aged 
50 years, last heard of twelve years ago, is 
inquired for by his sister. Address, Mrs. 
Anna M. Mills, 644 W. 61st street, Chicago, 
111. 



EFFECT OF "WELFARE" CREW. 



While upbound from Cleveland for Mil- 
waukee with a load of coal, Charles Mc- 
Caulley, second-mate of the steamer C. A. 
Eddy, was taken violently insane. Flour- 
ishing an ax, he ran amuck on the boat un- 
til overpowered by members of the crew 
and the captain. Unable to control the man, 
the captain of the steamer placed McCaul- 
ley in the hands of the authorities in Che- 
boygan, Mich. 

Enough to make anyone go insane ! 



The new fire tug Torrent arrived at Two 
Harbors on August 15. She is owned by 
the Duluth Iron Range Railroad Company 
and will be used to protect its docks at that 
port. The new boat is a duplicate of the 
McGonagle located at Mesaba docks, Du- 
luth. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY, 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

674 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Teleplione, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Teleplione 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 65 Main Street 

Telepiione 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 21 Hlgii Street 

Telephone Bell 175 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 1890. 

NORTH TON A WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 Third Street 

Telephone, New Phone, Broad 155 L. 

BAY CITY. Mich 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96) King Street 

ERIE, Pa 328 German Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 113 92nd Street 

Telephone 2853 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 



HOSPITAL AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



RELIEF 
Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth. Minn. 
lOsr.'inaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Mich. 
Hou(?hton, MIrh. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 



STATIONS. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee. Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
•Sheboygan, Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



CONQUEST OF LOCKJAW. 



The popular belief that a wound from 
treading on a rusty nail is very likely to 
cause tetanus is quite correct. This is not 
because it is a nail or is rusty, but because 
by lying on the ground it has become in- 
fected with the germs of lockjaw. More- 
over, as the punctured wound caused by the 
nail bleeds but little and this blood dries 
up and excludes the air, the most favorable 
conditions for the development of tetanus 
exist, for, as Kitasato, the Japanese bac- 
teriologist, proved, the absence of oxygen is 
most favorable to the growth of this germ. 

The germ itself looks very much like a 
tack. So virulent is it that its toxin in doses 
of l-200,000th of a teaspoonful will kill a 
mouse. It has been found by experiment 
that the poison is carried up to the spinal 
cord, not by the absorbents or the blood ves- 
sels, as are other poisons, but through the 
motor nerves themselves. Fortunately, an 
anti-poison or antidote has been developed, 
but so prompt is the action of the poison 
that in an animal, two minutes after the in- 
jection of a fatal dose of the poison, twice 
as much of the remedy is required as if it 
had been administered with the poison ; 
after eight minues ten times the amount, and 
after ninety minutes forty times the original 
amount is necessary. This antitoxin is en- 
tirely harmless. 

As a result of antiseptic methods lockjaw 
is now almost unknown except after neg- 
lected wounds, instead of being terribly fre- 
quent as it formerly was. When it is feared, 
the antitoxin is used as a preventive, and 
when it has developed, as a cure. 

In animals, for naturally horses suffer 
enormously more frequently than man, the 
same antitoxin is used. In 163 horses that 
had operations performed on them, but were 
protected by the antitoxin, not one de- 
veloped tetanus, whereas of eight cases un- 
protected by the antitoxin, five developed 
tetanus. The result of all these experi- 
ments has been that what is known as 
Fourth-of-July tetanus, has been enormously 
diminished, chiefly by the antitoxin used as 
a preventive. — W. W. Keene in Harper's 
Magazine. 



CONQUEST FOR ENGLISH. 



OLDEST BRITISH INDUSTRY. 



The death of an old "flint knapper" at 
Brandon, in Suflfolk, recalls the fact that 
flint working is the oldest industry in the 
British Isles. Experts believe that some of 
the terms in use among the Brandon knap- 
pers are relics of the neolithic age. The 
ancient savage used the flakes of flint to tip 
his spear or javelin or to dress skins. Then 
came the demand for "strike-a-lights." In 
the seventeenth century the industry was 
revived by the need of flints for flintlock 
small arms. This continued until the per- 
cussion cap was invented, but the industry 
was not even then killed entirely, for the 
flintlock guns were shipped abroad, to Africa 
and Asia, and the demand for flints brought 
many orders to the Brandon works. I do 
not know what the present prices are. but 
ten years ago, when^I was making a special 
study of the subject, they were: Second 
musket, 5s 6d a thousand ; common musket, 
4s 6d : second carbine, 3s; second horse 
pistol, 5s 6d ; common horse pistol, 2s 9d ; 
common carbine, 4s 6d. — London Daily 
News. 



The adoption of the English language as 
the officially recognized foreign tongue of 
China, which has just been decreed by the 
Prince Regent, deserves more notice in the 
English-speaking countries than it has yet 
received. "Of the foreign languages," says 
the Ministry of Education at Peking, "Eng- 
lish is most extensively used throughout the 
world. It was the first introduced into 
China, and is most widely employed here. 
The number of English textbooks imported 
is far greater than those imported from the 
other countries. It is, therefore, proposed 
that in all the different schools of China the 
English language be adopted." 

This is a departure of large consequence. 
While in 1810 the number of persons in the 
world w-ho used English as their home 
tongue was exceeded by those who em- 
ployed Russian, French, Spanish and Ger- 
man, the English leads all those tongues in 
1910. Of course, this great expansion in 
the field of the English language is due 
chiefly to the rise of the United States. In 
population the United States stands next to 
Russia among the peoples of the white race, 
but hardly half of the people of the Mus- 
covite Empire talk the Russian tongue. Of 
the 125,000,000 people who use English, two- 
thirds of them reside in the United States. 
And the lead of the English tongue is stead- 
ily lengthening. — St. Louis Globe-Democrat. 



FIGHT ON ATLANTIC. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLRTfORN. 



Much is heard to-day about the race for 
naval supremacy. But the race is no less 
keen in the commercial contest, and just 
now most of the great steamship lines are 
preparing fresh giants for the ocean strug- 
gle. Here again the rivalry is between the 
British and the Germans, both being eager 
to hold the blue ribbon of Atlantic trans- 
port — the chief shipping route in all the 
world. 

When the Lusitania and Mauretania rele- 
gated the German Deutschland to a subor- 
dinate position as an ocean flyer the chal- 
lenge was renewed, and to-day on both sides 
of the North Sea there is strenuous endeavor 
to create new records in tonnage and speed. 
The White Star line is well advanced with 
the construction of two new monsters, the 
Olympic and the Titanic, the Hamburg- 
Amerika line answers with a still bigger ves- 
sel, the Hansa, to the great delight of the 
Kaiser, and now the Cunard line gives hints 
of plans far beyond anything yet designed. 
So the contest proceeds, with much minor 
rivalry to keep it company. 

There is another influence on the Ameri- 
can side of the Atlantic that has made for 
shipping developments. Since the Ambrose 
Channel and other New York harbor im- 
provements were carried out shipping men 
have found the limitations to the dimensions 
of their vessels removed. The biggest liners 
they have ever dreamed of can now gain 
ready access to New York. 



One Scotch casualty insurance company 
is offering policies to aviators, while an- 
other will extend all future policies to 
cover the risk of aviation and ballooning. 



Americans have discovered an extensive 
deposit of whiting in the Mexican state of 
Campeche, and will mine it and ship it to 
Mobile, Ala., for refining. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
.States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interest for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 

INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Continued frnni P.'iKe 5.) 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

S.-\N FRANCISCO, C.il.. 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOII\'ER, B. C. 122 Alexander St.. P. O. Box 
1365. 

TACOMA, Wash.. 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash., 1312 Western Ave.. P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND. "Wash.. 114 Quincy St.. P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND. Ore.. 51 Union Ave. 

EUHEK-A.. Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 327. 

SAN PEDRO. Cal.. P. O. Box 67. 

IIONOHILU, H. T.. Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts.. 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cil., 01 Steuart St 

Branch: 
SE.\TTLE, Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. F,l Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 209-210 Powell Building, P. O. 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO. Cal.. P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, W.isli.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, ■V\^^sh.. P. O. Box G. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. . . „, „. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE Wash.. 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

BAY AND RIVER STEAMBOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 51 Steuart St, 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, Cal., 200 M St. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the abovc-mrnlioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



NEEDS OF AMERICAN SEAMEN. 



Much has been said and written about the 
"decadence of the American merchant ma- 
rine." Many proposals have been made to 
remedy the matter. Organizations have 
been formed to exploit the subject. Publi- 
cations have been issued having for their 
exclusive motif the "rehabilitation of the 
merchant marine." Yet the merchant marine 
remains unrehabilitated. 

The trouble lies in great measure in the 
fact that attention has been devoted to but 
one aspect of the question, namely, the ship 
herself. The seaman — the vital element of 
the problem — has been entirely ignored, or 
dismissed with a more or less contemptuous 
reference to "foreign trash." 

We are told that "there are no American 
seamen," and that the "labor market" may 
be depended upon to yield all the men needed 
to man the merchant marine ! Hence the ex- 
clusive attention to the matter of procuring 
ships. The case is clearly one of "putting the 
cart before the horse." 

In any effective plan for the improvement 
of the merchant marine two distinct elements 
must be recognized, the seaman and the ship. 
The plan must afford a guarantee of securing 
seamen as well as .ships. 

Recognition of this duality in the nature of 
the problem is the more important in the case 
of any plan based upon the payment of public 
moneys. In such case the public must be as- 
sured by the terms of the proposed measure 
that the service thereby established will be 
effective not only for commercial purposes, 
but also, and indeed primarily, for the larger 
purpose of public defense. 

"Millions for defense, but not one cent for 
tribute" expresses the attitude of the public 
toward any proposal that promises nothing 
more than the establishment of shipping for 
commercial purposes only. 

It is true that the various bills recently intro- 
duced in Congress for the purpose of aiding 
the merchant marine have contained, in the 
bill at least, a nominal recognition of the prin- 
ciple here stated. These bills have been de- 
signed, among other purposes, "to promote the 
National defense." In the earlier of these 
measures much emphasis was laid upon the 
fact of personnel, and their sponsors openly 
declared for a merchant marine "owned by 
American citizens and manned by American 
seamen." In keeping with this conception of 
the subject, these bills usually contained cer- 
tain provisions concerning the crews of ships 
deriving aid under the proposed legislation. 

Unfortunately, these provisions proved to 
be mere "make-weights." That is, they of- 
fered the form rather than the substance of 
effective legislation. Every attempt to im- 
prove upon these provisions, so as to afford 
assurance that the ships aided by public 
moneys would be manned by American sea- 
men, native or naturalized, in at least reason- 
able proportion, has been opposed and de- 
feated. The subsequent defeat of these meas- 
ures has resulted largely from the failure to 
give practical expression to the truth that the 
ship and the men composing her crew are co- 
ordinate and inseparable elements of one sub- 
ject. 

In order that the merchant marine may be- 
come an "auxiliary of the National defense" 
in fact as well as in name, the legislation de- 
signed to that end must require that the ships 
operated thereunder shall carry in their deck 
crews a certain proportion — say three-fourths 
— of seamen able to speak English and having 



at least three years' experience on deck in sea- 
going vessels. 

Thus assurance would be given that the 
vessels in question shall be manned by seamen 
qualified by knowledge and experience to take 
their place in the line of whatever duty the 
vessels themselves may be called upon to per- 
form. In the absence of such requirement, 
the crews of the vessels deriving aid under the 
proposed legislation would be composed of 
men employed without reference to their quali- 
fications as seamen, or to any other considera- 
tion higher than that of "economy in cost of 
operation." 

The latter statement describes the condition 
now existing with reference to the employ- 
ment of ships' crews. The United States stat- 
utes contain absolutely nothing on the subject, 
other than a provision that vessels carrying 
passengers for hire shall be "sufficiently 
manned." The question of "sufficiency" is 
left entirely to the inspectors in the respective 
ports, which practically amounts to leaving the 
matter to the discretion of the shipowner. The 
latter may, and as a rule does, send his ships 
to sea with the smallest possible crews, com- 
posed of the cheapest men obtainable. 

Much of the loss of life and property at 
sea is due to this cause. The steamer General 
Slocum, burned in New York harbor several 
years ago, with the loss of nearly 1000 lives 
(mostly women and children), was manned by 
roustabouts who knew nothing about handling 
boats or other life-saving appliances. The Pa- 
cific Mail liner City of Rio de Janeiro, lost 
in the Golden Gate, in 1901, with nearly all 
her passengers, was manned by Chinese, who 
could not understand the orders of the officers, 
and whose efforts were confined to an attempt 
to save their own lives. 

Such instances might be multiplied indefi- 
nitely. Many of the largest steamers on the 
Great Lakes have been manned during the past 
two seasons by college youths, farmhands, la- 
borers and boys of fifteen or seventeen years. 
The result has been an unprecedented number 
of disasters involving great loss of property 
and many fatalities. Yet Congress persistent- 
ly refuses to adopt a manning provision, upon 
the ground that to do so would "hamper com- 
merce !" 

It may be that even the inclusion of a spe- 
cific provision for efficient manning would not 
suffice to overcome the objection, so widely 
prevalent, to any form of public aid to the 
merchant marine ; but the existence of such 
provision would obviate objection upon the 
ground of inconsistence in failing to recog- 
nize the manning question as a factor in the 
efficiency of the merchant marine, regarded 
both from the viewpoint of safety to the travel- 
ing public and of National defense. 

While the laws affecting American seamen 
have been materially improved in recent years, 
chiefly through the efforts of the seamen's 
unions, the progress in this respect has not 
kept pace with other conditions of the mari- 
time industry, and least of all with the condi- 
tions of the workman's life on shore. As 
compared with his fellows on land, the sea- 
man of to-day is relatively much worse off 
than at any time in the past. This fact is due 
to the extreme slowness of evolution in the 
maritime codes. 

The maritime law of the nations dates back 
to 2250 B. C. In any other connection this 
statement would contain no other suggestion 
than that all law is of ancient origin. In the 
present connection, however, the reference to 
ancient times has the merit ( ?) of modern 
application. Only a few years ago the Su- 



preme Court of the United States, in the 
famous Arago case, declared that the Thir- 
teenth Amendment to the Constitution had no 
reference to seamen; that the latter were a 
"peculiar class," governed exclusively by a 
statute based upon the law of the ancient 
Rhodians, "which antedated the birth of Christ 
by about 900 years !" Thus we see that the 
Civil War, which freed the slave, left the sea- 
man in the position which he had occupied 
from time immemorial — that of a chattel, 
bound to the ship equally with the other "fit- 
tings and appurtenances thereof." 

The law of involuntary servitude, or "im- 
prisonment for desertion," as it is commonly 
called, remains on the statutes to this day. Al- 
though abolished in the coastwise trade, that 
law still applies to the American seaman in a 
foreign port. In other words, the seaman 
who "deserts," i. c., leaves a vessel in a for- 
eign port, may be imprisoned fo/one month. 
This and other archaic features of the mari- 
time law must be abolished if it be hoped to 
"rehabilitate the American merchant marine." 

The y\merican merchant marine can not be 
rehabilitated until the American people turn 
again to the sea as a worthy field of endeavor. 
This the American people will not do until the 
laws governing maritime affairs, and especially 
those dealing with the seamen, are brought 
into accord with modern American conceptions 
of justice and liberty. 

The passage of legislation to improve the 
conditions of the seaman, by attracting the 
American boy to sea life, would do more to 
arouse interest among the people at large than 
any amount of public aid in the form of ship 
subsidies. As long as the American seaman 
is compelled to live under conditions essen- 
tially those of slavery the American people 
are likely to hold to the position that the less 
slavery under the Stars and Stripes the better. 
— Walter Macarthur, in Sacramento Bee. 



BRITISH PARCELS POST 



The parcels post business transacted 
through the British Postoffice in 1909 was 
as follows: Parcels forwarded, 2,808,051, 
of which 221,639 were insured; parcels re- 
ceived, 1,534,042, of which 140,782 were in- 
sured ; total parcels forwarded and received, 
4,342,093, an increase of 89,732 over the pre- 
ceding year, and an increase of 15,227 par- 
cels insured. 

The following statement shows the value 

of the goods exported from and imported 

into the United Kingdom by parcels post 

during the past three calendar years: 

Parcels— 1907. 1908. 1909. 

Exporter! ^22,575,289 $24,685,715 $25,163,630 



Imported 



7,473,294 7,124.303 7,029,640 



Total $30,048,583 $31,810,018 $32,193,270 

The extensions of the system in 1909 were 
as follows: With Russia in Asia and with 
Northern Manchuria and Japan by way of 
Siberia. Improvements were made in the 
system with Egypt, Portuguese East Africa, 
Dutch East Indies, Argentina and Panama. 
There has been a very great growth in 
the number of parcels sent from the United 
Kingdom to the United States by reason of 
the revision of the rates in postage, and the 
increase in the maximum weight from four 
pounds six ounces to eleven pounds. 



The two-mile tunnel through the "l^ack- 
bonc" of the Andes, on the line of the tran- 
andean railway, connecting Valparaiso and 
Buenos Ayres, is to be ready for regular 
train service by next June. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



News from Abroad. 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 



Egypt's cotton crop this year, it is 
estimated, will exceed 700,000,000 
pounds, the largest crop ever j'ielded 
by Egyptian fields. 

The Bourse Gazette, of St. Peters- 
burg, announces that Emperor Wil- 
liam of Germany wil visit St. Peters- 
burg in November. 

Mexico crowned the celebration of 
her centennial with the dedication of 
a monument to the independence of 
the Republic at Mexico City on Sep- 
tember 16. 

The Spanish Government has au- 
thorized the holding of Catholic dem- 
onstrations in the principal cities of 
Spain in October against "the pre- 
vailing impiety." 

Destructive rains have caused heavy 
losses in the southern province of 
Scania, Sweden. Much grain has been 
ruined and the sugar beet crop has 
suffered severely. 

The agitation against the restric- 
tions placed on the importation of 
foreign meats, based on the inade- 
quacy of the domestic supply, is in- 
creasing in Germany. 

The Bolivian Senate on September 
16 approved the concession granted a 
syndicate of British capitalists for the 
construction of a railroad from the 
Yacuma River to Santa Cruz. 

The cholera epidemic has been prac- 
tically stamped out in Apulia, a 
division of Southeastern Italy. Dur- 
ing one day recently only four new 
cases and two deaths were reported. 

The round-up of Jews listed for ex- 
pulsion continues. From September 9 
to September 12 fifty were sent out of 
the city and thirty-two others were 
notified to depart within a given 
period. 

The Paris Temps confirms the re- 
port that Turkey and Russia have en- 
tered into a military alliance, and says 
that the convention indicates Turkey's 
rapproachment with the Powers in 
the Triple Alliance. 

William M. Sloane, the Seth Low 
professor of history at Columbia Uni- 
versity, New York, has been decorated 
with the French Legion of Honor. 
Professor Sloane has been a prolific 
writer on French history. 

The latest type of Count Zeppelin's 
inventive genius met with disaster at 
Baden Baden on September 14, when 
the dirigible balloon, Zeppelin VL 
took fire after an explosion while be- 
ing warped into her shed. 

Second Officer Funnell of the 
steamer Swazi was swept overboard 
and lost during a fierce gale on Sep- 
tember 4. The Swazi, in command of 
Captain .Abbey, sailed from New York 
on August 31 for Marseilles and ottier 
ports. 

The monastery of the Spanish 
Jesuits at Aldeira-Ponte has been 
closed by a Government decree and 
the Jesuits expelled from the country. 
The latter are warned that if they 
return to Portugal they will be ar- 
rested. 

The elections for the first Federal 
Assembly were held in United South 
Africa on September 15, and the most 
dramatic result recorded was the de- 
feat of General Louis Botha, the 
Premier and Minister of Agriculture, 
at the hands of the Unionist, Sir 
Percy Fitzpatrick. 

A band of brigands disguised as 
passengers held up a Russian steamer 
plying on the Sungari, twenty miles 
south of Harbin, on September 12, and 
after a desperate fight overcame the 
crew and robbed the passengers. In 
attempting to defend their vessel, the 
owners, two Russians, were killed. 




Established 1888. 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

Oldest School on Pacific Coast. Largest 
and best equipped private Nautical School in 
the United States. Graduates prepared for the 
American and British Merchant Marine exam- 
inations. Warrant offlcers of the United States 
Navy prepared for examination for commis- 
■fion officers. Special course for cadets enter- 
ing the United States Naval Academy. 

Personal Instruction by Captain Henry Tay- 
lor, M. A., Compass Adjuster. Certified In- 
structor, Passed Master, Proctor in Admiralty, 
Counselor at Law and competent to give legal 
advice on all matters, Including Naturalization. 

WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHOLESALE Sole Agents for RETAIL 

The McCormack System of Fine Tailoring 

McCORMACK BROS. 

Importers, Jobbers and Retailers 

MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, CAPS, BOOTS AND SHOES 
TRUNKS, VALISES AND NOTIONS 



812-814 FIRST AVENUE, Opp. Colman Block 



SEATTLE, Wash. 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



NEVER HAD A FAILURE 



11 COLMAN DOCK 



SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opp. Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 






HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 
HATS AND 
SHOES, at 

Westerman & Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 

SEATTLE. WASH. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St., 

Seattle, Wash. 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

Undertakers 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Candidates for Mas- 
ters' and Mates" Ocean 
or Coast Licenses of 
all Grades are In- 
structed in the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
'^- Navigation In all Its 

-^•t^-'V, Branches, and in the 

v^^^ Arithmetic of Navi- 

gation in a Clear and Intelligent Manner. 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College; 
Ocean Steamship Master. Unlimited; 
Puget Sound and .\laska Pilot; Author of 
"Self Instructor in Navigation." Chart 
and Se.xtant Practice, etc. 

494 ARCADE BUILDING 
Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
buccessful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



Seattle, Waah., Letter LUt, 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
PostofBce. letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mail forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mail until arrival. 

Albrlgtsen, G. J. Kalnow, A. 

Allen, J. Keenan, Fred 
Anderson, Einor ChrKenny, J. 
Anderson, John -1534Klesow, P. 

Anderson, Alf. Kronsbrand, H. O. 

Andersen, Andrew Larsen, Claus 

Apps, P. Latz, Konstanz 

Armstrong, W. H. Lewis, Geo. H. 

Bausman, E. -1511 Lindegard, J. 

Benson, F. -1765 Lundberg, C. 
Berg, Edmund -1312Lunder, Bjorn 

Berge. Johan Lundgren, C. J. 

Berenken. A. Lul, Theo. 

Bianca, F. -1661 Mattson, E. M. 

Botherel, A. Martin, Chr. 

Bryning, Walter MoAdam, J. 

Brown, L Miller, James 

Carlson, Harold Mikkelson, M. -158-J 

Carlson, G. -622 Morgan, Ed. 

Chrlstensen. Peter Moore, J. M. 
Chnstoffersen, Her-Monson, Andrew 

^ '°f Nielsen, N. A. -909 

Chnstensen, Otto Nielsen, Martin 

^-IrP Nielsen, M. A. 

Davidson, Jacob Nobereit, Gustaf 

Doll. Herman Nord, G. E. C. 

Dxeyer, Herman Olsen, Oscar, -1062 

Elfstrom, A. Olsen, S. 

Erikson, Allan Olsen. Gabriel 

Lskola, Henry Olsen. Valdlmar 

iernandoez, A. Olsen, B. -597 

Franzell, A. Olsson, John H. 

Frivald, John Olsen, Hans 

Frednckson, B. Omundson, Harry . 

Frose, Ellas Paterson, Robert 

German. R. B. Pedersen, Olaf 

Giandal, Harry Pederson, A. -1173 

Gronburg, Theodor Peterson, A. -1223 

Gustav, John Petterson. C. W. 

Hansen, John P. Pennlngrud, Ludon 

Haakonsen, H. Porje, Anton 

Hass, Wilhelm Randle, Dave 

Hansen, Hans Chr. Ruzner, Ernest 

Hansen, Andrew Rickardson, Adam 

Harjes, H. -1940 Rimmer, J. 

Ha tness, M. Schmidt, Alfred 

llellisen, II. Selander. John 

Henriksen, Adolf Shane J 

Hernonen, H. Shallow, 'j. 

Hillig, Alb. Smith, Max 

Ho mes, Paddy Speller. Harry 

Holmes, Gus Svensson, A. -1691 

Jensen, Hans Swenson, L. G. 
Johansen, C. M.-1593Tallopon, A -721 

Johansen, Olaf K. Williamson, A. 

Johnson, Bernard Zagan, J. 

Johnson, Chall Zeisler, A. 

Johnsen, C. J. Zima, W. 
Jorgenson, J. 



KUKEKA, CAL. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squire-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Jose Alonzo and Chas. Domingo, 
marine firemen, and Antoine Silvia 
and Jose Requeiva, oilers, are re- 
quested to leave addresses with E. A. 
Erickson, 1st Patrolman, care of 
Sailors' Union. 

Any one knowing whereabouts of 
Harry Fields, sometimes called Mar- 
tin Smith, kindly report to F. Ascher, 
1817 Chapin street, Alameda, Cal. 

P. J. Bertlesen, winchman; J. Berg, 
V. Erickson, Olaf Kjellman, L. Linde- 
beck, Theadore Yunther and M. C. 
Rasmussen, seamen; F. H. Sullivan, 
steward; W. Kidd, cook; J. Cote and 
Ed. McNeills, firemen, and G. Lina- 
nans, gallcyman, on the steam- 
schooner Washington at the time she 
picked up the Minnie E. Kelton. 
Please call on F. R. Wall, 1209 Mer- 
chants' Exchange. 



My work Is my best advertisement. 

W. H. MIDDLETON 
TAILOR 

A. H. ANDERSON, CUTTER 

Custom Tailors' Union Label In every 

Garment. 

519 THIRD AVENUE 

Three Doors South of James, SEATTLE. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outside of Union Office 

Seattle, Wash. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO., 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
an>-where ALONG THE COAST. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda. 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers In Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F. 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Anders Peter Andersen, a native of 
Denmark (Bogo), aged about 42, is 
inquired for by his sister. Address 
.\laska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart 
street. 

Wilhelm Mahsing, last heard of as 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is inquired 
for by his brother, John Mahsing, 
now sailing out of New Orleans. Ad- 
dress, Marine Firemen's Union, 514 
Dumaine St., New Orleans, La. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union -made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street, • Eureka, Cal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT BROS. 


JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 


WATCHES AND JEWELRY 
Cor. of HERON &. G STS. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, 
Groceries and Notions. 
We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 
320 S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service. 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Ow/ner of "The Red Front." 



TACOMA, WASH. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 
Clothmg and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 

around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Towniend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf, 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing Is our motto. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. S. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Close* at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE TACOMA, WASH. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



C. J. SWANSON 

Clothier and Furnisher for 
Gentlemen 

Up-to-date Suits Made to Order 

Hats, Caps, Shoes, Oilskins and 

Rubberboots 

Bedding, Blankets and Pillows 

Uniform gold braids and gold wreaths 
of all descriptions 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Washington 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phone Douglas 1082 

Home Phone C-3486 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 




OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

H. I. MALLEK 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Men's Outfitters, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, Flannel Shirts, 
Quilts, Blankets, and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road" and "Can't Bust 'Em" Overalls, 76c; Hickory Shirts, 50c. 
Everything Union made. 

I will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 

Remember the place, one block north of Union Hall, 2320 N. 30th St., Old Town. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, etc. 
ROSENSTEIN BROS. 
23 N. Third Street, near Burnslde 

Portland, Oregon. 



WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441 
Residence Phone Tabor 3 
I give you a Claim Check for your bag- 
gage at home. Give me your work 
or we both lose money. 
Office: 
23 UNION AVENUE - - Portland, Ore. 



CJBfrBusr'Qi 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 





UNION MADE CLOTHING 

from our factory to 

your back 

$15.00 Suits For Men 

(Guaranteed in every detail) 

S. N. WOOD & CO. 

Market and Fourth Sts., 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Washington and 11th Sts., 

Oakland, Cal. 



When making purcha.ses from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE SCANDINAVIAN STORE 

717 Pacific Ave. Near City Hall 

B. OLSON, Proprietor. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

John Ferdinand Petterson Franken, 
a native of Finland, is inquired for. 
Address Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Peter Nielsen, from Aarhus, Den- 
mark, is inquired for by Christ Han- 
sen, 230 W. Thirty-second street, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Josef Jurek, a native of Rosdzin, 
Germany, is inquired for by the Ger- 
man Consul, 201 Sansome street, San 
Francisco. 

John Tierney, last heard from by 
letter, October, 1906, is inquired for 
by his sister, Mrs. Wm. Degnan, 124 
Harrison street, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Robert Fordyce Bowers, last heard 
of at San Francisco, in March, 1907, 
is requested to communicate with his 
mother Mrs. M. E. Watson, of 12 
Lampton street, Bishopswearmouth, 
Sunderland, England. 

Joseph Flinn, last seen in Los An- 
geles and San Francisco, Cal., is in- 
quired for by his sister, Marie, and 
brother-in-law, John O. Breien, of 
Liverpool, England. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify John 
O. Breien, 4 Conti St., Mobile, Ala. 

Carl Leopold Anderson, native of 
Nordtelje, Sweden, last heard from in 
New Orleans, La., November, 1904, is 
inquired for by his brother John An- 
derson. Address: Sailors' Union, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

John Jolinson, a native of Norway, 
born September 15, 1858, at Blege- 
leidct Bainle; last heard from in 1904 
living at 230 Third street, San Fran- 
cisco. Any one able to give any in- 
formation kindly communicate with 
his nephew, M. Olsen, Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Wilhelm Pemoeller, a ship's car- 
penter, who was discharged from the 
German sailing vessel Nordsee on Feb- 
ruary 14, 1908, and Jobs. Herm. Ditz, 
a machinist, who left the German 
steamship Arabia in September of last 
year, are inquired for by the German 
Consulate at Portland, Oregoi.. 



The population of Oswego, N. Y., is 
23,368, as compared with 22,199 in 1900. 

The population of New Rochelle, 
N. Y., is 28,867, an increase of 14,147, 
or 96.1 per cent., as compared with 
14,720 in 1900. 

An earthquake lasting three seconds 
occurred in the Imperial Valley, Cal., 
on September 13. The quake was pre- 
ceded by plainly audible rumblings. 
No damage was done. 

A bill will be introduced at the next 
session of the Massachusetts Legisla- 
ture calling for a greater Boston, to 
embrace forty cities and towns in- 
cluded in the metropolitan district. 

In the primary election in South 
Carolina on September 14, Coleman 
Livingston Blease of Newbury, local 
optionist, received the Democratic 
nomination, equivalent to election, for 
Governor of South Carolina. 

George W. Fitzgerald, a former as- 
sorting teller in the Chicago Federal 
Subtreasury, was arrested in that city 
on September 14, charged with the 
theft of $173,000 from the Subtreasury 
on February 19, 1907. 

The largest gathering of negroes 
ever held at New Orleans occurred 
on September 14, when President 
Morris called to order about 7000 dele- 
gates to the National Convention of 
Negro Baptists. 

A first dividend of 15 per cent to the 
creditors of the defunct First National 
Bank of Rhyolite, Nev., was declared 
on September 13 by the Controller of 
the Currency. The bank failed on 
March 19, 1910. 

For reasons which are not divulged, 
the State Department has decided to 
make a change in the American Le- 
gation at Panama, and R. O. Marsh 
has been ordered to report at the 
State Department for duty therein. 

President Taft has denied a pardon 
for Edward Boyle, John Coyle, Pat- 
rick T. Hennessy and Thomas Kehoe, 
the sugar weighers, who were sen- 
tenced for frauds on the Williamsburg 
docks of the Sugar Trust. 

That the four daughters of John 
Jensen, a leper, isolated at Calumet, 
Mich., would not be a menace to the 
school population and can not be ex- 
cluded from the public schools is the 
conclusion drawn by State Attorney- 
General Kuhn. 

The population of Covington, Ky., 
is 53,270, an increase of 10,332, or 24.1 
per cent, as compared with 42,938 in 
1900. Kenton County, in Kentucky, in 
which Covington is located, has a 
population of 70,355, as compared with 
63,591 in 1900. 

The population of Chicago is 2,185,- 
283, an increase of 486,708, or 28.7 per 
cent., as compared with 1,698,575 in 
1900. This makes Chicago the second 
largest city in the United States and 
the fourth city in the world, being ex- 
ceeded only by London, New York 
and Paris. 

The Democrats carried Maine in the 
election on September 12, for the first 
time in many years. The Governor, 
two Congressmen, the Legislature and 
many other officials were elected on 
the Democratic ticket. The Legis- 
lature will elect the first Democratic 
Senator in sixty years. 

The wills of the late Melville W. 
Fuller, Chief Justice of the United 
States Supreme Court, and his wife, 
Mary E. Fuller, who died in 1904, were 
admitted to probate on Septernber 16. 
The late Chief Justice died possessed 
of an estate valued at $950,000, while 
the estate of his wife is placed at 
$115,000. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Labor Day at Pittsburg was marked 
by the dedication of a Labor Temple 
and the first street parade of or- 
ganized workers held in that city in 
six years. 

Members of the National Federation 
of Postoffice Clerks opened their an- 
nual convention at Chicago on Sep- 
tember S. Delegates from all States 
in the Union were present at the 
opening session. 

The announcement was made at 
Houston, Texas, on September 13, 
that the Missouri, Kansas and Texas 
Railway had voluntarily raised the 
wages of its telegraphers by amounts 
of from $7.50 to $13 per month. 

About 200 upholsterers and mat- 
tress-makers struck at San Francisco 
on September 12, when the employers 
declined to grant the increase in 
wages demanded by the Upholsterers' 
Union, leaving twenty-eight factories 
idle. The men demand an increase 
of fifty cents a day. 

Operators of the Southwest coal 
mining district on September 12 rati- 
fied the contract agreed upon by the 
representatives of the miners and 
operators. It is expected that the 
mines will be opened and the 35,000 
miners who have been on strike for 
months be back at work shortly. 

General Botha, the ■ South African 
Prime Minister, speaking recently at 
Pretoria, said he was opposed to aid- 
ing immigration unless and until the 
unemi)loyed arc given land. He ad- 
vocated the wholesale deportation of 
Asiatics from South Africa, and com- 
pensating them for the deportation. 

A resolution was carried at a recent 
Auckland (N. Z.) Trade and Labor 
Conference, that the Conference 
strongly petitions the Government, 
calling attention to the urgent need 
of suppressing the exploitation of the 
masses by establishing State indus- 
tries connected with the main neces- 
saries of life. 

The number of trades represented 
by labor unions in Greater New York 
now exceeds 1200, according to re- 
ports gathered for the United Trades 
Council, .\niong the new unions 
formed during the past month are or- 
ganizations among the forceps finish- 
ers, umbrella makers, women comb 
makers and Jewish bookbinders. 

The Government Statistician of New 
South Wales has issued a statement 
as to the manufacturing industries of 
that State in 1909, and in which it is 
shown that male employes received 
an average of £1 18s. per week, com- 
pared with 14s. 6d. for each female 
employed, or on a yearly basis of 
£98 12s. 3d. and £37 4s. 3d. re- 
spectively. 

In the dispute between the Sydney 
(Australia) slaughtermen and the 
meat companies an agreement has 
been arrived at on the lines of the 
New Zealand agreement in respect of 
wages and working conditions in ex- 
port killing establishments. The pro- 
posal by the employers to substitute 
piecework for weekly payment has oc- 
casioned a deadlock. 

The strike of 44,000 coal miners in 
Illinois, which was settled on Septem- 
ber 8, it is estimated, cost the miners 
$12,000,000 in wages. The loss to the 
operators during the five months' 
shut-down is placed at $15,000,000. 
The annual production of coal in Il- 
linois amounts to 50.000,000 tons, and 
the shortage this year due to the 
strike will be in the neighborhood of 
20,000,000 tons. 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall Is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Abrahamsen. -1263 
Adanisson, John 
Andersen, -1310 
Andersen, Edvln 
Andersen. -1591 
Andersen, 1329 
Andersen, -1526 
Andersen. -1661 
Anderson, -1474 
Anderson, Harold N 
Anderson, -779 
Anderson. -1344 
Andersson, Aug. 
Baker, C. W. 
Barney, Chas. 
Barwa, David 
Beahan, Ed. 
Beausang, E. 
Beck, John A. 
Behrens, Otto 
Bendixen. Nlc 
Berg, H. J. 
Berg. Edmund 
Berg. Mickel 
Berntsen. Eilert 
Bianco, -1661 
Bietila, -1338 
Bjerregaard. Chr. 
Bjorklund, Erik 
Carlsen, Jakob 
C'arlsen. Martin 
Carnaghan, W. 
Carrigan, P. J. 
Chaler. B. 
Charlsson, Carl 
Chauche. J. .•^^. 
Christensen, C. D. 
Christensen. E. H. 
Dahl, Olaf 
Dahlstrom, Herman 
Dahlstrom, -749 
Danielsen. Sigurd 
Daumgold. Ernest 
Day, Harry B. 
De Agnello, P. 
De Baere, H. 
Edwards, Louis 
Bhlert. Aug. 
Ekstrom, Geo. 
Eiiasen, -396 
Ellis, Jack 
Klonen, M. H. 
Engebretsen, -125 
Fagerholm. Carl 
Faragher, John 
Faulkner, John E. 
Foeley, Tom 
Fersfh, Wm. 
Fischer. Peter 
Fjollman, Jonas 
Foley, J. J. 
Folkman. John 
Garves, C. 
Gasman, Geo. A. 
German. R. B. 
Gibbs, Harry 
Godorog, Vasale 
Gonzalez, J. 
Gravier, Eugene 
Gronman, -456 
Guerrero. Mrs. 

Haagensen, Martin 
Ilageli, Torvald 
Hallgren, John 
Halvorsen, Anton 
Halvorsen, I'sak 
Halverson. -595 
Halvorsen. William 
Halvorsen, Severln 
Haniann. Fr. 
Hansen, H. O. 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, N. S. 
Hansen, C. O. 
Hansen, Niels 
Hansen. -2085 
Hansen, Adolph 
Hansen. Hans 
Hansen. Christ. 
Hansen. Ragnvald 
Hansen. -2060 
Hanson. Chas. G. 
Idog. Chas. 
Illig, Gust 
Jakobsen, J. E. 
Jackobson, Emll 
Jamleson, J. E. 
Jensen. Edward 
Jensen, M. C. 
Jensen, Geo. L. 
Jensen, N. O. 
Jensen, A. 
Jensen, Olof Nils 
Jensen, R. 
Jensen, -769 
Jensen, -1987 
Jensen, 1461 
Johansen. Axel 
Johansen. Chas. 
Johansen, A. P. 
Johansen. -1705 
Johansen. Mathias 
Johari.scn. -1421 
Johansen, -2004 
Kallas. Aug. 
Karls(.n. Jolin A. 
Karlsson. Josef 
Karlsson, R. 
Karlsson. Gus. Robt 
Karlsson, Gust. 
Kaspersen, O. Chr. 
Kaus, L. 
Kavanagh, Jas. 
Kayser, Chas. 
Kiel, P. 
Kielnian, -885 
Klesel. A. C. 
Kinerman, Chas. 

Laason, M. 
Lagerberg, P. 
Lahr, Otto 
Larsen, Emll 
L.irsen, Laurils P. 
Larsen, Emil. -1344 
Larsen. Martin 
Larsen. Julius 
Larson. Lars M. 
Latz, Constantino 
Lausman. John 
I>auritsen, Ole 
Laws, J. B. 



Andersson. John 
Andersson, -1126 
Andersson, -1514 
Andresen, -1635 
Andreasen, Hans 
Appelgren. John 
Armstrong, W. H. 
Arnke. Conrad 
Arnold. E. B. 
Asplund, Aug. 
Austrand, Ch. 
Aylward. James 

Bjorn. Kristian 
Blank. Geo. 
Blecha. Alf. 
Bliesath, Max 
Bolsen, Knud 
Boye, Axel H. 
Brams, C. S. 
Bregler, Fred. 
Brekke. Hans 
Brelln. Adolf 
Broden, Julius 
Brox. Henrik 
Brunwald, H. 
Bryde. C. M. 
Bush, Peter 

Christensen. -1332 
Classen, Henry 
Classen, John 
Clausen, Chr. 
Cooley. Howard 
Coughlan. C. 
Coughlan. -1174 
Croschet. D. 
Cutler, Wm. 
De Santis. E. 
Doense. J. 
Doose. W. 
Drausman. Hans 
Dreger. Jack 
Dreier. Paul 
Duff, Wm. 

Erdman. -1704 
Brlksen, Edw. 
Ericksen, Emanuel 
Eriksen, Ole 
Eriksson, C. E. 
Ericksson. Chas. 
Evans, E. 
Forsman. Frank 
Foyn. Sam 
Fralneso. P. 
Frankovic. A. 
Fran.oson, Frank G. 
Fredriksen. B. D. 
Frieberg. P. 
Furesson, Theo. 

Guldberg, Randolf 
Gunn, W. O. 
Gunderson, -899 
Gundersen, -785 
Gustafson. Ivar 
Gustman, C. 
Gustafson, G. 
Gustafson, Oscar 

Hanssen, -1867 
Hansson. Chas. G. 
Hannus, A. 
Harlow, H. A. 
Harmonsen, K. 
Hartkoph, Joseph 
Haug, Hans H. 
Hedinskoy, J. 
Hedvall, A. 
Helin, John 
Helmros, G. 
Helmer. Fred 
Hendriksen. HJ. 
Henriksen. -1734 
Hetman, Walter 
Hevne. Herman 
Hilke, Carl 
Hogelld, Tom 
Holmberg, Olaf 
Hunt, Gus 

Isaksen, Gunnar 

Johanesen, Geo. A. 
Johanesen, -1064 
Johansson, 2036 
Johansson, -2076 
Johnsen, Norman 
Johnson. J. B. 
Johnson, C. R. 
Johnson, Jas. K. 
Johnson, Emile 
Johnson, Alf. 
Johnson, -1700 
Johnson, -1547 
Johnson, -1597 
Johndahl, H. 
Johanson. Axel B. 
Johansson. H. A. 
Jorgensen, Johan 
Jorgensen, -1840 
Jorgensen. Wm. 
Josephson, E. W. 
KjcUgren. L. A. 
Knieling. John 
Knopf, Louis 
Knudsen, Lars 
Koch. John 
Kolter, L. 
Konlng, R. 
Koster, Jack 
Kristoftersen, Alf. 
Kristophersen. Jacob 
Krogstad. H. E. 
Kuhlman. Louis 
Kukuhskin. M. 



Lawberg. Albert 
Le Bloa. Sylvain 
Lehto. Emil 
Lersten, J. O. 

Macrae, Alex. 
Malmberg. Ells 
Markus, Bernhard 
Maripu, Johan 
Martin, H. 
Mathisen. Martin 
Matre. Nels J. 
Matthews. F. 
Mattson, John M. 
McKeating, Richard 
McLouglin. M. 
McBratney, Hugh 
McMahon, -1887 
Mesak, E. 
Nagel, A. 
Nanberg, Gus 
Nanjack, G. 
Nelsen, -972 
Nelson, Chas. M. 
Nelson, Martin 
Nelson, John 
Nerbrugge, D. 
Newman. J. 
Nick. Peter 
Odeen, Per. 
Odland. B. B. 
Ohls. Johan 
Oistad, Hans 
Olafson. M. 
Olmann. P. 
Olsen. -1112 
Olsen. Otto 
Olsen. Ole, Chr. 
Olsen. Jens 
Palmroth. J. 
Pearsson. John L. 
Podersen, Julius 
Pedersen. Laurits 
Pedersen. Aage 
Pedersen, Henning 
Pemberton, Dave 
Petersen, H. C. 
Petersen. F. A. 
Petersen. -936 
Quigley. R. E. 
Raahange. J. F. 
Ranak. Louis 
Reiner, Karl 
Rein hold, Ernst 
Richardson, A. 
Roblnet, Geo. 
Roelfs, J. 
Salvesen. Fred 
Samsig, Carl 
.Sander, -1068 
Sander, -1068 
Sandstrom, Ivar 
Sandstrom. O. H. 
Saul. Th. A. 
Schevig. A. B. 
Schmalkuche. Fritz 
Scholl, Karl 
Scholtens, Ben 
Schultnian, J. H. 
Schultman. Johan 
Schulz, Ernst 
.Schelenz, Hant 
.Schluter, Paul 
Schmidlen, John 
Schnell. Henry 
Schultz, Albert 
•Schwenke, Karl 
Scott, E. G. 
Seagreen, John 
Seberg, C. 
Seiger, Joe 
Sharp, Fred 
Tancer, Chas.- 
Teigland. Carl 
Terente, M. 
Tergesen, Tom 
Terwedow, Richard 
Tetter, Anton 
Thorkildsen. J. 
Thompson, Ch. 
Van der Made, L. 
Van der I.,aan, D. 
Vesta, Tom 
Wahl, Robert 
Wahlberg, Rudolph 
Wakroom, J. 
Wannkvist, E. 
Ward. H. 
Wehde. Fred 
Wenneck, A. 
Werner, Paul 
Zagen, Geo. 
Zazan, J. 



Ludlow, J. J. 
I-und. P. 
Lynch, -1586 

Metje, Gus. 
Meyer, Frank 
Meyer, Raymond 
Mikkelsen. Axel 
Miller, J. B. 
Mltchel, Alex 
Monsen. Cornelius 
Moore, J. C. 
Morken. J. L. 
Mullen. Joseph 
Munster, Fred 
Murphy. -1916 
Murray. E. 

Nicolaysen. Carl 
Nielsen, -1037 
Niit, P. 

Nilsen, Andrew 
Nilsen. -1060 
Nord, G. E. 
Nordling. Sven 
Nordlof, D. H. 
Nordlof, Sigurd 
Nylund, Hans J. 
Olsen, -235 
Olsen, -754 
Olsen, Marinus 
Olsen. Chas. 
Olson. Nils 
Olsson, -502 
Olsson. -910 
Oterbeck, Hans H. 
Ottenhausen, Carl 
Ouchterlony, Fred 
Peterson, Frank V. 
Peter.son, Harry 
Petterson. John B. 
Pierson. Andrew 
Pietschman, Geo. 
Plas. M. J. 
Plaskette, Mike 
Post, Albert 
Prescott, Richard 
Purdy, W. T. -1360 

Rolf, Henry 
Rosa, -998 
Rosenwald, Isak 
Ross, Wm. 
Runak, Hans 
Rylander, Rudolph 

Sjoberg, Johan 
Skjellerup. A. 
Smith, Henry 
Soderlund. Anton 
Sorensen, Michael 
Sorensen. -1064 
Sorensen. -1492 
Soto. Santos 
Stangeland, P. E. 
Sterro. J. E. 
Stein. John 
Stewart. J. L. 
Stolzer. Aug. 
Stolt. A. J. 
Strand. Olaf 
Strom, C. 
Sunde Albert 
Sund. Alex 
Suomlnen, O. 
Svenson, Algol 
Sweeney, John 
Swenson, Edwin 
Swanson, Ims. 
Swanson, Martin 
Swanson. -2184 
Thomassen, Paul 
Toroik, Olaf 
Torbjornsen. O. 
Tramm. Hans 
Trentani, Louis 
Tscheekar. F. 
Tuft, Edw. 

Vucle. V. 
Vucic, V. 

Wever, Carl 
Whalstedt, Alb. 
Wlad, H. I. 
Wiborg, John 
Wikstrom, Emil 
Wills, Geo. 
Wlllemson, A. 
Willman, -1020 
Zweygberg. John T. 



Portland, Or., Letter List, 



Antonsen, Fred 
Anderson, John 
Anderson. P. Risor 
Belzen, Ivan 
Backman. Ernest 
Brown, Chas. R. 
Bjomsgaard, Kristen 
Carnie. Robert 
Conwell, James 
Ekblom. Alfred 
Goodman. Carroll 
Haaversen. Otto 
Handloss. Paul 
Harbeck, Ted 
Jessamine. Alex. 
Jacobson, Gus -1092 
Kusik. J. 
Kuutan, Alexander 



Lewis. Geo. Henry 
Leesi. A. 

Mattson. E. -1510 
Mattson. Julius 
Ness. Aksel 
Norman. LAidwig 
Ollgreen, Carl 
Olson. Anton 
Ponnl. Anton 
Purje, Anton 
Steen. Hilmar 
Scott. Wm. 
Schaab, Anton 
Stephan. M. 
Tyler. Wm. B. 
Winters. Fred 
Whlttol. J. 



Pt. Townsend Letter List. 



Bianca. F. 
Carlsson, -1044 
Carlsen, H. G. 
Harmenlng, Fritz 
Hillig, Albert 
Kustel, V. J. 



Ollng, G. 
Simonsen. Sam 
Smldt, A.. -938 
Schnell, Heinrlch 
Tramm, Hans 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 



Andersen, -1609 
Andersen, Martin 

-1661 
Anderson. Victor 
Andreasen. Hans 
Behrentz. C. 
Brandsten, Ernest 



Larsen, Lars, -1290 
Larson, G. A. 
Lewis. H 
Pihpick, K. 
Lindsay, Peter 
Lundman. Carl 
Martin, H. 



^ . . *-....,..w ATxtti lilt, n. 

Christensen, Chris- Matisen, Nils 



Levense, John 
Lindekrantz, F. 
Lindgren, Gustaf 
Lindroth, Erik 
Lindroth, Gustaf 
Llndskog. Thor. O. 
Lofland, -2121 
Louis. Martin 
I..undberg, Fred 
Lundgren. Hugo 
I..undqvlst. Oscar 
Lundin. -1054 
Luckman, Ewald 



ten 
Christansen, N. 
Damlano. Alex. 
Dyeness. L. E. 
Eckert. W. F. 
Forsman. Frank 
P^rickson. E. R. 
Hansen, O. R. 
Hansen, -1229 
Hardmere, C. 
Ilengst, Otto 
Jensen, -1342 
Jensen, -2014 
Johansen. Niel 
Johanson, -1677 
Johannessen, 
Kaald, John 
Kirst. Hans 
Larsen, Anton 



Mattler, Franz 
McKlnnon. A. B. 
Nielsen, A. -342 
Olsen. G. 
Pedersen. Chas. 
Pedersen. Karl 
Petersen. N. -782 
Peterson. Henning 
Purdy, W. G. 
Rignell, Eric 
Schager, E. L. 
Slegurd, J. I. 
Sterro. J. E., -1690 
2071Stensland, Paul 
Strand. -1786 
1863 Swanson, Martin. 
-2184 
Thompson. A. 
Torgersen. Kaspar 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Alfred J. 
Bowers. Gust. 
Collins. E. F. 
Davey. Chas. 
Eishel. Erich, -740 
Fors, Alfred 
Hansen, Chas. 
Haug. Hans H. 
Kimeral. Herman 
Lewis, J. W. 
Lowe, John A. 
Moorten. Louis 
Nelson. Fred 



Nelson, Nels B. 
Ness, John 
Olsen, Chas. 
Petterson, Knut L. 
Pettersen. Johan 
Reay. L. A. 
Renter, Ernest 
Robsham, Jens W. 
Lolb.^rg. B. P. 
Thore, B. E. 
Ullman, Gustaf 
Vongehr. Edward 
Zelig. Gustav 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Axel Osen, a native of Orlandet, 
Throndjem, aged 23, is inquired for 
by his mother. 



Andreasen, O. L. 
Aken, Emit 
Asker, John 
Andersen, Oluf 
Andersen, J. -934 
Andersen. Sam 
Adman. O. 
Buth, Siegfried 
Brander, Wm. 
Boy, George 
Brandt, Nils 
Bensen, John 
Collins, F. 
Coolev, Howard 
Castel, J. 
Calson, Carl 
Comstock, Howard 
Cuttler, Wm. 
Davis, John 
Dirks. George 
De Cantes. M. 
Fi.sko, Oluf 
Faccet. Sam 
Gras. Charles 
Graves. Sam 
Granberg. Gus S. 
Hubner, H. 
Hall, Leonard 
Hohnstrom, C. A. 
Holm, Carl 
llartman, Geo. 
Hansen. Ole 
Hanson, Henry 
Houser, Cliarlie 
Johnson, Andrew 
Jacobsen, G. -1092 
Isacson, Ch., -140 
Johanson. HJalmar 
Jarf, Kristian 
Jorgensen, Charles 
Johnson, C. -1345 
Jensen, Ingvalt, M. 
Johannessen, Josef 
Johanson, Fr. -2019 
Johanson, Teodor 
Johnson, R. W. 
Johnson, Carl, -1585 
Johnson. Julius 
Johansen. Herluf C. 
Jonasson Carl Axel 
Johnson, Frank 
Kose, Armin 
Karlson, Edvard 
Krumblegel, Arthur 
Kuhnie. Wm. 
Kimeral, Herman 
Kielman. Joe 
Koffer, Mark 
Klolen, Karl 
l^undberg, 0. 
Lindbloni. Ernst 
Larsen, George 



Lindholm, Chas. 
Lingberg, Oscar 
La.rson, M. A. 
Lohtonen, John 
Lengwems, U. L. 
Lorentzen. Ernest 
Linquist, Gust 
Lorln, Martin 
Lind, Gust 
Miller, Otto 
Mattson, Karl 
Mattson, J. 
Neilson. A. O. 
Nurmi, Victor 
Nilson. Alfred 
Olsen, Ernest 
Olsen, E. A. 
Olsen, Carl 
Olsson. Carl G. -1101 
Olsen, Oswald, -1059 
Oscar, Carl 
Orten, Sigurd 
Olson. Wilhelm 
Olsen. John 
Olsen. Valler 
Olsen, Olaf O. 
Pedersen, Kristian 
Petersen. Oscar 
Poison. C. -641 
Pearson, Julius F. 
Pettersen, Wilhelm 
Pedersen, Hans Chr. 
Petersen, Oscar Fr. 
Petersen, A. G. -2404 
Prondberg, G. -1306 
Peratls, John 
Rosweli, Gus. 
Host. K. G. 
Rasmussen, N. G., 

-485 
Swanson, Martin 
Skoman, Chas. 
Sverstrup, E. F. 
Sparre, Don 
Schulter, Paul 
Schelenz, Karl 
Steversen, Charles 
Stevens. Scott R. 
Sorensen. Karl 
Svenson, Bernard 
Siegurd, Jushus T. 
Smith, J. V. 
Speckman, Max 
Thompson, Chas. 
Thorsen, Jens 
Uolby. Harold 
Wishaar. E. B. 
Westnas, Ivar 
Wuorio. J. 
Veaal, G. 
Winters. C. 



Eureka, CaL, Letter List. 



Andersen, John 
Anderson. Olof 
Anderson, S. 
Armmi, Walter 
Blunt, H. 
Bostrom, C. 
Brown. C. L. 
Bryan. G. F. 
Christensen. Harvy 
Conaughton, H. 
Ekwall. G. A. 
Fors. Alfred 
Fraberg, Enock 
Goevyette. Joseph 
Grant. John 
Gunther. Theo. 
Gustafson. Edvard 
Horlin, Ernest 
Hollins, Frank 
Isaacson. Gustav 
Ivars, Carl 
Johanesen. Arthur 
Johnsen. J.. -25 
Johnston, R. 
Karlson. Anders E. 
Klauson. Axel. 
Lombar, Ermlno 
Lorensen. Org. C 
Mlchaelsen. Johanes 



Micheli Agojtlno 
Niccolai, Sant 
Nilsen. R. 
Nilsen, O. 
Nordblom, Ben. 
Nylund, Sven 
Olsen. Peder A. 
Olson, Bror. 
Olson, C 
Oman, Victor 
Palomo. G. 
Pedersen, Martin 
Pedersen. Paul 
Pedersen, Peter 
Petterson. Aaskar 
Penney. Math. 
Salminen. K. W. 
Seiander. Gustaf 
Shuils. Christ. 
Sjullman. Jonas 
Stlenen. J. C. 
Svendsen. Olof 
Teigland. G. 
Thoresen. Petter 
Kalkman, Otto 
Walbreth. C3arl 
Wllsonn. John 
Yannle. C. 
Yulmky, Wm. 



WHITE PALACE GOOD- 
YEAR SHOE RE- 
PAIRING CO. 

JOE WEISS, Prop. 

56 East St., bet. Market and 

Mission, San Francisco 

Always in stock full lines 
of Union-Made and Govern- 
ment shoes, new and second- 
hand. 

Your old shoes made new. We use 
the best leather in the market. 

Half Soles, sewed 75 cts. 

Half Soles, sewed, and Heels $1.00 

Rubber Heels 50 cts. 

All Work Guaranteed! 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourtii and Market Sts. 

Piione Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings (THE GERMAN BANK) Commercial 

(Member of tlie Associated Savings Banlis 
of San Francisco.) 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital .... $ 1,200.000.00 
Capital actually paid up in cash $ 1,000,000.00 
Reserve and Contingent Funds . .$ 1,555,093.0.5 

Deposits June 30th, 1910 40,384,727.21 

Total Assets 43,108,907.S2 

Remittance may be made by draft, post office, or Wells 
Fargo & Co's money orders, or coin by express. 

Ctffice Hours: 10 o'clocli A. M. to 3 o'clocli P. M., except 
Svturdiys to 12 o'cloclt M. and Saturday Evenings from 
6.3) o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of deposits 
onlv. 

' OFFICERS— President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-Pres- 
ident, Daniel Mever; Second Vce-President and M najcr, 
Goorge Tournv; third Vice-President, J. W. Van li'-' n; 
Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier. \Vil ia::i 
Herrmann; Secretary, A. H. Mullcr; Assistant Soerc'ar.es, 
G. J. 0. Folte and Wm. D. Newliouse; Good.ellow & 
Eells. G-^neral Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, Daniel M v-r, 
George Tournv, J. W. Van B;'rgen, Ign. Steipha"', 1. N. 
Walter. F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and V.'. S. C "d- 
fellow. 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission Street, between 2lBt 
and 22nd Sts. For receipt and payment of Deposits only. 
C W. H»ver. Manaser. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH. 432 Clement Street, 
between 5th and 6;h Avpn>i<'s. For receipt and payment 
of deposits only. W. C. Heyer, Manager. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 Folsom street, near Third street 

Over 100, all sunny rooms to let; fur- 
nished up-to-date; electric lights; run- 
ning hot and cold water; baths free. 
Rates, $1.75 to $3.00 per week; 25c to 
75c per day. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 
400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
J2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, oppo- 
site Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. 
Baths, Reading Room. OfHce open all 
night. Best place near waterfront. 
Investigate. 



FERRY HOUSE 

CORNER EAST AND MISSION STS. 
Opposite Ferry Building 
EARTHQUAKE AND FIREPROOF 
The only house In the block between 
Market and Mission streets which was not 
injured by the great catastrophe of 1906. 
Nice Sunny Furnished Rooms from 25c 
to $2 per day; $1.50 to $6 per week; rooms 
for two persons $2.50 per week. 



Blue Diamond Havana Cigars are 
satisfactory because they are hand- 
made from imported Havana by com- 
petent union cigar makers — 2 for 25c 
—10c, 3 for 25c. 

THRANE BROS., Makers. 
46 East St., Under Union Headquar- 
ters and 1800 Market St. 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 

109 STEUAR TST. , San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



THE EAGLE CIGAR STORE 

and Laundry Office 

HENRY BORNEMAN, Proprietor 

Give me a call for old time's sake 

229 EAST STREET 

Between Washington and Jackson Sts. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roil Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Below 5th, near U. S. Mint and Emporium 

Phones: Kearny 1966; Home J-1966 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Nils Edmund Johansen, a native of 
Tansberg, Norway, aged about SO, la.st 
heard of at Melbourne, Australia, is 
inquired for by his brother. Address 
Martin Johansen, 839 Centennial ave- 
nue, Alameda, Cal. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

OF CAUrORNU 

MARKET AND SANSOME STREETS 

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Authorized Capital, $3,000,000. Capital Paid In. $]. 500.000 

Accounts of individuals, firms, corporations and societies solicited 
Interest paid on savings accounts at the rate of 4% per annum. 
Drafts and Letteri of Credit Issued, payable In all parts of the world 
Chas. F. Leege, Pros. W. A. Fred-^rlck, Vice-Pres. B. G. Tognazzl, Manager 

Chas. C. Moore, Vlce-Pres. 

Qavin McNab, Vice-Pres. 



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Magazines, Novels, Pens, Ink, Paper, 

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Thompson's Blood Specific Cleans the 

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The name of "Fighting Bob" Evans 
iieads the list of directors in the arti- 
cles of incorporation filed by a new 
oil concern with the County Clerk of 
San Francisco on September 13. 

.\ movement has been started at 
Philadelphia to have steamship com- 
panies discontinue the practice of 
burying at sea the bodies of persons 
who die on shipboard while crossing 
the Atlantic. 

The stone barge Kellogg, of Stur- 
geon Bay, turned turtle in a heavy 
sea near Ludington, Mich., on Sep- 
tember 9. The crew jumped over- 
board and were rescued by the tug 
Smith. 

Excellent progress was made in the 
month of August by the Panama 
Canal diggers. The total amount of 
excavation was 2,813,462 cubic yards, 
place measurements, against 2,406,288 
yards in the preceding month. 

The largest school of whales ever 
sighted by an ocean liner was dis- 
covered off the Newfoundland Banks 
on September 9 by the steamer La 
Gascogne. Passengers were able to 
count fifty of the mammals in sight 
at once. 

Colonel William M. Black and Cap- 
tain Harley B. Ferguson, engineer 
corps, United States Army, and mem- 
bers of the board appointed to devise 
means for raising the wreck of the 
Maine, did their first preparatory 
work at Havana on September 10. 

Commander J. M. Olivers of the 
Peruvian navy is in New York at the 
beginning of a tour of inspection of 
American navy yards. His visit may 
result in the placing of an order in 
this country for gunboats for his Gov- 
ernment. 

The steamship Indianapolis has 
been secured to leave Philadelphia 
early in October on the new Tussco 
Line, operating between Philadelphia 
and Panama. This will be the second 
vessel to sail in the service to the 
Canal Zone. 

Never before has there been such a 
rush of American traffic from Europe, 
via Canada, to New England States 
and New York, as that now being ex- 
perienced in the port of Montreal, 
due, it is said, to the stringent cus- 
toms regulations at United States 
ports. 

Faulty installation and design of 
the oil-burning apparatus on the 
dreadnought North Dakota were re- 
sponsible for the accident on that 
battleship on September 8, whereby 
three men were killed and eleven in- 
jured, according to the report of the 
investigating board. 

The first meeting of the Inter- 
national Court of Arbitration to hear 
tlie Orinoco claims case in dispute 
l)ctween the United States and Vene- 
zuela will be held at The Hague on 
October 28. The Orinoco Steamship 
Company filed a claim with the Vene- 
zuelan Government for more than 
$1,400,000 for the alleged arbitrary 
destruction of certain exclusive privi- 
leges by the Government of former 
President Castro. 

Cool courage and strong nerves 
were exhibited by Emil Falk, a gun- 
ner's mate on the battleship Iowa, on 
September 1, when he plunged over- 
board between the steel hull of the 
battleship and a lighter from which 
she was coaling in the effort to save 
the life of a shipmate, James E. 
Stanley. In acknowledgment of his 
bravery the Navy Department has 
officially commended in the highest 
terms the conduct of Falk, who is 
a resident of Milltown, N. J. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



He drove a golf ball through the air, 
It fell to earth, he knew not where, 

Until he heard the luckless yell 
Of him upon whose head it fell. 
— Washington Star. 



Had No Kick.— "Catch any fish?" 

"Nope." 

"Better luck next time." 

"I'm satisfied. I don't care to have 
cheap fish biting these expensive 
flies."— Kansas City Journal. 



Answered.— Willis — So Skinner's 
mining scheme broke you? I thought 
you got in on the ground floor? 

Gillis— I did. That's the reason I 
was buried so deep when it fell in. — 
Puck. 



Gayly Voracious. 
Each year the moth comes forth to 
view 
To fill us with misgiving, 
An ultimate consumer who 
Fears not the cost of living. 

— Washington Star. 



Hard to Convince. — Little Tommy 
(eldest of the family, at dinner)— 
Mamma, why don't you help me be- 
fore Ethel? 

Mamma — Ladies must always come 
first. 

Tommy (triumphantly) — Then why 
was I born before Ethel? — Tit-Bits. 



Restrictions. — "This," said the en 
thusiastic patriot, "is the land of lib- 
erty, where each may pursue happi- 
ness " 

"Excuse me," interrupted Mr. Si- 
rus Barker, "but did you ever read the 
paper they make you sign before they 
will rent you a flat?" — Washington 
Star. 



Unwitting Slander. — A Western 
bookseller wrote to a house in Chi- 
cago asking that a dozen copies of 
Canon Farrar's "Seekers After God" 
be shipped to him at once. 

Within two days he received this 
reply by telegraph: 

"No seekers after God in Chicago 
or New York; try Philadelphia." — 
Everybody's. 



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FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 





A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 




VOL. XXIV. No. 2. 


SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1910. 


Whole No. 2088. 



REPORT ON SEAMEN'S CONFERENCE. 



ANDREW FURUSETH, President of the 
International Seamen's Union of America, 
who attended the International Seamen's 
Conference, at Copenhagen, last month, as the 
representative of the American seamen, has sub- 
mitted his report of that gathering. The report 
of Comrade Furuseth is herewith presented, as 
follows: 
To the International Seamen's Union of 

America: 

Comrades: — As your representative at the In- 

.ternational Transport Workers' Congress, held at 

Copenhagen, beginning August 23, and ending on 

the 27th of the same month, I beg to report as 

follows: 

In accordance with your instructions I visited 
England, Norway and Sweden on the way to the 
convention. 

Upon arrival in London, July 26, I found that 
a delegation consisting of seamen and Members 
of Parliament was about to call upon the pres- 
ident of the Board of Trade, on the 27th, and that 
a meeting, or rather a demonstration, would be 
held in Liverpool on the 28th, in the evening. 
Being invited to go with the delegation to the 
president of the Board of Trade, I gladly availed 
myself of the invitation, in order that I might see 
how those things are done in Great Britain and 
to hear the president's answer. 

The request made by the delegation was that 
the president of the Board of Trade should use 
his good offices to cause the shipowners to agree 
to a Conciliation Board under the law and pre- 
sided over by a non-partisan man of standing. 
The president answered that he would be pleased 
to do whatever he could in the matter. 

The delegation then presented an alternative, 
by informing the president that in event of the 
failure of such board being established and the 
worst grievances redressed, there would be a 
strike of seamen in every one of the important 
British ports, and in such event the president was 
asked to see to it that the shipowners would be 
compelled to obey the law, both as to the signing 
on of men and as to the kind of men, especially 
that the form which the shipmaster must present 
at the Custom House before obtaining clearance 
— a form issued by the Mercantile Marine Office 
at each port, and certifying that the vessel has a 
proper crew — be not issued until the crew has 
been filled up, in accordance to law. The pres- 
ident stated that in event a strike should take 
place, and he hoped that that would be avoided, 
no discrimination would be shown; the law would 
be enforced. 

A skirmish for wages had been started in sev- 
eral British ports. Men had struck in London 
for a ten-shillings increase. Men had been sent 
from Liverpool by the Shipping Fe<lcration. The 
same thing had taken place in Manchester, where 
the Shipping Federation had acted in the same 
way. Wages had been raised from £3 10s. or 
£3 15s., to £4 10s. at Cardiff. 

J. Havelock Wilson was to go to Manchester 
and Liverpool, and from there to the Bristol 
Channel, and I was renuested to go with him, my 
expenses to be paid by the British Union. I 
readily consented to go, but stated that the 



American seamen were paying my expenses. We 
left on the afternoon of the 27th and arrived in 
Manchester in time to address a meeting that 
night. We addressed another meeting in the 
forenoon of the next day, and then proceeded to 
Liverpool and took part in the demonstration, 
which consisted of two parades, one beginning 
at each end of the city, meeting together and 
jointly proceeded to St, George's Hall, where ad- 
dresses were delivered from four platforms. 

The newspapers estimated that twelve thousand 
were in the parade, but it is safe to say that the 
number was fifteen thousand. We proceeded the 
same night to Cardiff, where I remained with 
Mr. Wilson for three days, speaking at Cardiff, 
Newport and Barry Docks, two or three times a 
day. 

In so far as I could judge the spirit of unionism 
is on the rising tide, strongly so in all the British 
ports that I visited, the most backward place be- 
ing Liverpool. At rvery place, and at every 
meeting, every allusion to an international strike, 
or in failure thereof a national strike, brought 
cheers and expressions of approval from the 
crowd. The men seemed bitterly dissatisfied with 
their present conditions, but seem to have little 
hope of being able to improve it except by a 
strike taking place in all ports at once, and 
preferable in every country at once. When they 
were warned that if they left ' their vessels in 
violation of the shipping articles they would be 
put in jail, a great many answers came back, 
"Let them!" 

From Cardiff I went, by way of Newcastle and 
Shields, to Stavanger, Norway. So far as I had 
an opportunity to ascertain, it appeared to me 
that the temper of the men at Shields was about 
the same as that of the other British ports. I 
had only half a day at Shields. 

I arrived in Stavanger in the morning, August 
1, and as soon as possible proceeded to get into 
communication with Mr. Barstad, president, 
Norske Sjomands Forbund; he was out of town 
and I did not meet him until late in the after- 
noon. There was no intention on the part of the 
organization to send any delegates to Copen- 
hagen, the reasons being twofold. A Socialistic 
opposition organization connected with the com- 
bined trade-unions of Norway and also with the 
International Transportworkers' Federation was 
presumed to be sending a delegate, and with this 
idea in their minds they did not feel justified in 
expending any of the scant funds of the organiza- 
tion in going to Copenhagen. 

After some discussion on the subject, Mr. 
Barstad changed his mind, being convinced that 
the meeting was of such importance that they 
ought to have representatives, I then proceeded 
to Bergen with a view of getting a representative 
from the firemen to go also. They agreed with 
me that it would be wise, but found it impossible 
to obtain in the short time the necessary author- 
ity. Of this I was informed after my arrival in 
Christiania. The organizations in Christiania de- 
cided to send one man, Mr. H. L. Olson. The 
opposition organization sent its president, Mr. 
G. Gulbrandsen. 

The quarrel on the inside has done great harm 
to the movement in Norway, at least temporally, 
but the actions taken at the Copenhagen Con- 



gress, namely, deciding "Norske Sjomands For- 
bund" to be a legitimate organization and unani- 
mously inviting it to join the Federation will no 
doubt help to heal the differences and bring them 
all together, a matter of the gravest importance 
lust now, when the report of the commission on 
law governing seamen is to come up in the 
Storthing and is being vigorously attacked by the 
shipowners. 

At the close of the conference at Copenhagen, 
Mr, J, Havelock Wilson and myself gave to Mr. 
Barstad a statement to the effect that our re- 
spective organizations w^ould not recognize any 
other organization of seamen in Norway except 
the Norske Siomands Forbund, We all believed 
that this would be of ~reat assistance and there- 
fore to the extent involved I mav have exceeded 
my authority. From Christiania I went to Stock- 
holm and had a conference with Mr, Lindley, the 
president of the Seamen's Union of Sweden and 
also of the Longshoremen, There has been very 
little progress in Sweden, and the great national 
strike has so reduced the number of men in the 
labor movement that it will take some time to re- 
cover. 

The Congress was called to order at 10 o'clock 
in the Wittmiack Hall, Holmens Kanal 17. There 
were present as regular delegates forty-four mem- 
bers, representing the United States, Rel.gium, 
Germany, Denmark, England. France, Finland, 
Holland, Italy, Norway, Austria and Sweden, 
and eighteen guests representing Holland, Servia, 
Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Switzerland and Nor- 
way; also two men from the Central Committee, 
Mr. Doring and Mr. Jochade, both of Berlin: total 
membership represented, 429,410. 

At the reading of the secretary's report the 
question of the seamen's position in the Trans- 
portworkers' Federation was raised by J. Have- 
lock Wilson asking the direct (|uestion: "Is there 
anything in the law which forbids the seamen 
from having an international organization and 
yet remain with the International Transport- 
workers?" No answer was obtained to this ques- 
tion until the debate had progressed for about 
one day on this and other questions in the report. 
The Executive Board then answered by stating 
that there was nothing to hinder such organiza- 
tion being formed under the jurisdiction of the 
International Transportworkers' Federation. The 
question of an international strike had been run- 
ning through the whole debate and it was finally 
decided that the seamen should have a separate 
conference and should bring back to the Congress 
some definite propositions to which they, the 
seamen, would be agreeable. 

After some discussion, the Seamen's Confer- 
ence appointed a subcommittee of five. In the 
-Seamen's Conference it had been ascertained that 
the grievances of the seamen of the different 
countries were nearly identical and that they 
were up against the same organization — the 
Shipping Federation. From that moment there 
was an absolute unanimity of feeling and opinion. 
A special committee of five brought back a report, 
made by Mr. Muller of Hamburg, strongly favor- 
ing an international strike UTiless the shipowner! 
of the different countries are willing to meet rep' 
rcsentativcs of the different organizations and tt. 
redress the worse of the grievances. Countries 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL: 



which had not sent in demands, should do so at 
once; meetings should be held in every seaport 
in Europe and Great Britain to bring full report 
to the me^ and to ascertain their will. There is 
no question about their desire, at least of a ma- 
jority of the men. The only real preparation 
necessary is to inform all the men so that the non- 
union men will be as ready as the union men al- 
ready are.,. Four men, one representing the Nether- 
lands, one representing Great Britain, one repre- 
senting Scan.dinavia and one representing the 
United .States, are to meet with the Central Com- 
mitted for the purpose of arranging for a union 
of national unions of seamen, if possible with one 
common card, but at any rate for an international 
tran.sfer with proper identification. Upon my 
statement that the United States was so far away 
that we might not choose to send any one, it was 
agreed that some one in Europe satisfactory to 
the United States may be selected. This report 
from the special committee was unanimously 
adopted by the Seamen's Conference and on the 
next day by the Congress itself. Mr. Muller again 
making the report. 

The longshoremen had been in separate con- 
ference at the same time, and among the things 
recommended and adopted was that seamen 
should not run winches. I deemed this recom- 
mendation so impractical, when the law is con- 
sidered, that I made no protest. 

By this time it had become evident that it 
would be impossible to complete the business be- 
fore the Congress during that day. Motion No. 1, 
which is our motion, had been deferred to be 
taken up under the third order of the day which 
was, "Situation, .'\pplication and Influence of the 
International Legislation on the Social and Legal 
Position of (a) the Seamen (with myself to open 
the discussion), (b) the Transportworkers (with 
Mr. Lindley), (c) the Traffic Laborers" (with Mr. 
Dreher of Berlinl. 

This order of the day was reached at nearly six- 
o'clock Friday evening. A motion was made to 
refer the whole matter to the Central Committee. 
To this Mr. Wilson and myself entered a vigorous 
protest and insisted that the Congress go on and 
complete its business. After some discussion it 
became evident that the majority was in favor of 
completing the business, and, since there was a 
banquet that evening and an excursion in the 
morning, the Congress took a recess until 2:30 
the next day, being Saturday. 

Our proposition had been published by the 
Congress in German, French and English. At 
the cost of £2 2s I had it translated into Span- 
ish and Italian. I had obtained the Norwegian 
translation in Norway and caused about forty 
copies to be run ofT on a typewriter at the cost of 
nine kroner and 40 ore, so as to make it available 
for all of the delegates. 

The statement made to the Congress at the 
opening of this discussion I had caused to be 
translated into French, German and Danish at a 
cost of seventy-six kroner. I had done this be- 
cause I did not feel that I could depend fully 
upon the interpreter. 

In opening I called attention that this had been 
done and requested that each of the delegates 
follow in his own language what would be said 
in English, thus leaving only the Italian delegates 
to have it translated too. The statement is as 
follows: 

Mr. Chairman and Comrades: — It pleased me 
very much when I was informed that I had been 
selected to make the introductory report upon 
Section 3 of the order of the day, and that it was 
entitled "Situation, .'\pplication, and Influence of 
the International Legislation upon the Social and 
Legal Position of the Seamen." 

This heading makes it appropriate to deal with 
the status of the seamen, the influence of that 
status upon our social and industrial life. 
Situation. 

In every country and in every trade, with the 
exception of the coastwise and the nearby foreign 
trade of the United States, there are laws under 
which the seamen, and this includes everybody 
below the rank of master, may be sent to prison 
for a time running from one month to more than 
one year for violating his shipping articles, or 
contract to labor. The usual expression of the 
seaman is "I belong to" thus or such vessel. This 
describes the actual condition. He "belongs to," 
i. e., he is part of the property of the vessel; he is 
in the same status as was occupied by the slaves 
in the United States or Brazil, or the serfs of 
Russia prior to their emancipation. He is as 
much the property of the vessel as is her main- 
mast or her anchor. If the master has reason to 
suspect that the seaman is about to "desert" or 
"escape" he may, without any judicial investiga- 
tion, cause such seaman to be imprisoned for safe 
keeping until the vessel is ready to proceed to 
sea, whereupon he may be conveyed on board, 
there to labor against his will. 

The reason assigned by the employing class 
for maintaining this system of law is, as they 
claim, the "necessity of Commerce." the "safety 
of navigation" and the "good of the men em- 
ployed on the vessels.'" The same arguments 
were made for the perpetuation of slavery and 
serfdom. The arguments hold as little of fact and 
reality behind them in their application to sea- 
men as they did in their application to the slaves 
or the serfs on shore. The Government of the 
United States gave to the seamen their absolute 
and undisputed freedom in the coastwise trade of 



the L^nited .States .and -in the trade from ports in 
the United States to port.s. in British North 
.\merica, Mexico, and. the West Indies Islands. 
This took place December 21, 1898. .\t that time 
nearly five per cent of the men shipped or en- 
gaged either failed to join their vessels upon 
which they had agreed to sail or they deserted in 
the first port touched by the vessel. In twelve 
years since that time the number of failures to 
join and of desertions has been reduced to less 
than one and one-half per cent. The wages have 
increased, the standard of individual efficiency has 
been improved, and the social position of the 
seamen has been immensely bettered. 

Application. 

When we pleaded with the Congress of the 
United States to abolish the serfdom of the sea- 
men. Senator Frye of Maine, objected very 
strongly and contended that it was necessary to 
have the law of imprisonment remain, not to be 
generally used but to be held "in terrorem" over 
the heads of the seamen. Being a very influential 
legislator, he succeeded in so amending the bill 
passed by the House of Representatives that "not 
to exceed one month's imprisonment" was con- 
tinued at the discretion of the court in a foreign 
port in the foreign trade. The House of Repre- 
sentatives had passed a bill which abolished all 
imprisonment for failure to join, for desertion, 
for disobedience of lawful commands in harbor, 
and which prohibited any payment of advances, 
either to the seaman himself or to anybody on 
the seaman's behalf, of any of the seaman's wages 
prior to the seaman having earned the same. This 
was done upon the theory, expressed by Senator 
Frye, that the different nations act together with 
reference to the enforcement or application of 
laws that provide for seamen's servitude. 

So long as men can be obtained to take the 
deserters' places at about the same wages or less, 
the law against desertion and failure to join is not 
enforced to the extent of imprisoning the of- 
fender; but whenever the men agree among them- 
selves to quit work in unison and to remain away 
from the vessel until their grievances shall have 
been considered and at least to some extent re- 
dressed, the shipowner promptly applies to the 
authorities for enforcement of the law, and the 
seamen may be, and are, taken and by force con- 
veyed on board, there to labor against their will — 
of course, only after they have been induced to 
sign the shipping articles. The shipping articles 
may be presented to them in any place; the rep- 
resentations made to them in order to obtain their 
signatures may be a parcel of falsehoods; that 
does not influence the situation, because a man 
having signed the shipping articles has become a 
seaman, and as a seaman he occupies the status 
of a child or an imbecile, and is therefore not to 
be believed unless there is indisputable corrobor- 
ative testimony. The presumption of law is that 
he seeks to evade his contract and that all he 
says is said with that object, and is therefore 
disregarded as unworthy of credit. 

When we remember that a man may be hired 
in Liverpool to join a vessel in Hull, that he may 
be hired in Havre to join a vessel in Marseilles, 
that he may be hired in Bergen to join a vessel in 
Christiania, and that having once agreed, he is 
bound to proceed on the voyage and the govern- 
ment of the nation in question is bound to en- 
force compliance with the contract, it will be seen 
how diflicult it is to successfully carry on a 
strike. Such a strike is in fact on an equality 
with a "servile rebellion"; it may be insignificant, 
but it partakes of the nature of such; because 
while the labor of a free man belongs to him- 
self, the labor of the serf belongs to his master. 
It is not therefore in the eyes of the law an asser- 
tion of the right of the man, but it is a rebellion 
against the employer under the law. H the law 
which provides for imprisonment were abolished, 
the men on getting on board of the vessel, either 
in the port where they are shipped or in the port 
to which they are sent, might examine into the 
vessel's condition, or into the status of the dispute 
that brought them to the place, and they might 
refuse to continue. They would have a right to 
take their clothing and themselves away from 
the vessel and to join those who in that particular 
port were standing out for better conditions or 
for redress of particular grievances. 

Along with the law providing for imprison- 
ment for failure to fulfil the contract to labor 
goes, as a usual thing, the permission granted by 
the government to the shipowners to pay part of 
the seamen's wages either to the seaman himself 
or to somebody on the seamen's behalf, prior to 
the earning of any wages. 

This permission has created the crimping 
system. The man. being destitute, is permitted 
to pawn himself for shelter and food, the agree- 
rrient being that the advance shall be paid to the 
man who provided for him. This leads directly 
to carelessness and lack of thrift on the part of the 
seaman. It makes him feel that he could obtain 
shelter and food on the strength of what he is 
going to earn in the next vessel, and therefore 
makes him careless of the money that he at the 
time may have in his pocket. But assuming that 
the seamen — the real seamen — should combine 
together and refuse to accept any advance, there 
is nothing in the laws of any country, unless 
it be in the law of France, to prevent the crimp 
(marine employment agent or boarding-house 
keeper) from picking up the destitute men or boys 
which he may find about the docks or any place 



where men go to seek employment, to take them 
'into his house and to put them on board vessels 
as sailors or firemen. .And when these mpn agree 
to go, when they have signed the shipping articles, 
the law of imprisonment steps in and compels 
them to go, no matter how eager they may be to 
withdraw from employment of which they know 
nothing. 

Influence. 

The direct result of this system is: First, the 
deterioration of the personnel of the merchant 
marine, a lowering of the wages of the men en- 
gaged in this calling or a prevention of any raise 
in their wages in comparison to the raise of wages 
on shore and a raise in prices of things necessary 
to maintain life and a family. It is a notorious 
fact that the wages of the seamen are substan- 
tially the same as they were fifty years ago, while 
the wages of skilled men on shore have doubled, 
and sometimes trebled, in proportion to the de- 
termination with which men have used the right 
of freedom and the right of organization. This 
means a corresponding reduction in the seamen's 
wages, because of the decreased purchasing poVver 
of such wages as they receive. We therefore find 
that while marriage was the usual thing .with 
seamen fifty years ago it is the unusual thing at 
present. His social position is much inferior to 
that of the skilled mechanic on shore. He is more 
and more being looked upon as an outcast. He 
is sneeringly fold that he has a wife in every port, 
presumably so as to make him forget that he 
doesn't earn enough to support one in any port. 

As a result of this seamen are leaving the sea. 
They are sailing from port to port looking for 
openings to do something else. The man is leav- 
ing the sea; the boy, who is gradually getting to 
understand the actual condition of seamen, refuses 
to go to sea. with the result that the employing 
classes seek men not only of other countries but 
of other races. There is an increasing drift from 
the sea among all the people of Europe, except 
the Germans, and the drift to the sea on the part 
of the Germans is artificially produced. Having 
learned what it is, they toc^ quit and seek to set- 
tle in any country where they can. Their places 
are taken by negroes, by Chinese, by Hindoos, 
or other races which we look upon as being in- 
ferior. The shipowner in the meantime main- 
tains that he can not get men of his own nation- 
ality to labor for him or that those that he does 
get are of an inferior kind and are not to be 
relied upon. 

The shipowner having resisted any changes in 
the law, either to free the seaman from his 
bondage or to provide a specific standard of ef- 
ficiency or any specific number of men to be em- 
ployed according to the work to be done, has 
driven and is now driving the better and more 
efficient men from the sea; he has created and 
is now creating the conditions in which inefficient 
and inferior sailors and the destitute are the only 
ones that can be induced to work for him. Com- 
plaining of the condition that he has created and 
in order to obtain still cheaper men, or men 
whom he can treat as he pleases, he now seeks 
men from other races whose civilization is on a 
different plane and whose standard of life is so 
different to that of men of European conceptions 
that they can be treated as cattle. 

For these reasons, comrades, we believe that 
the law that authorizes the imprisonment, either 
in a home port or in a foreign port, must be re- 
pealed; that the treaties between the different na- 
tions which provide for the capture and delivery 
to their masters of deserting seamen, must be 
abrogated. The system of advance, or payment 
of money before it is earned, must be forbidden, a 
standard of individual efficiency must be provided 
by law. and a minimum number of men for work 
to be done must be provided by law. 

The shipowner who answers that his own in- 
terest is sufficient to cause him to get the best 
men that he can, is not telling the truth when 
he makes that statement, because the system of 
insurance and limited liability takes the xisk 
and loss from him and puts it upon the general 
community. The general community have the 
right to insist upon a sufficient number of efficient 
men being employed upon vessels, to the end that 
the losses of life and property may be minimized. 
The general community should further insist that 
the men employed shall be placed in a position 
to obtain, wht never they tliemselves desire it 
seriously enough to unite for that purpose, a wage 
sufficient to sustain a family and to lay up enough 
for old age. .Anything short of this will cause 
within a limited number of years the white man 
to quit the sea and the transfer of the sea-power 
from the white to the yellow race. 

Having finished the reading of the above, T 
moved that the petition be indorsed and the leg- 
islative demands adopted. .After translation to the 
Italians, a general debate took place, in which ob- 
jections were made to some of the language used 
in the petition. Some criticized that it was ad- 
dressed to Christians, others objected to it on the 
ground of its "humility,"- others again because it 
iddressed itself to the feelings — that it was "too 
sentimental" to be adopted in a Congress of prac- 
tical men. Delegates who had studied the sea- 
men's status stated that in its description of the 
status it was absolutely correct, yet even these 
objected to what they called "begging." "Work- 
men should demand, not beg!" No one objected 
to the specific legislative demands. Others de- 
(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



FRAZIER'S REPORT ON LAKES. 



To the Executive Board International Sea- 
men's Union : 

Dear Comrades — I received a request 
from Vice-President dander to be present 
at the meeting of the Lake District Griev- 
ance Committee, to be held in Buffalo on 
August 24. I arrived in Buffalo on the 
morning of that day. Representatives of all 
afifiliated unions were present. The whole 
situation was carefully gone over and dis- 
cussed, and plans were laid out for extend- 
ing the work. On the whole, the situation 
looked good. 

We held a meeting in the Firemen's Hall 
for all affiliated unions, and it was attended 
by about 250 members, sailors, firemen and 
cooks. The temper of the men was good, 
and they seemed to be determined to stand 
out to the last. The meeting was addressed 
by Comrades Stack, Olander and myself. I 
promised the men that the Coast men were 
willing and ready to furnish the money. 
The picket lines are being well kept up in 
Buffalo, and they are doing good work. 

Some negotiations have been going on 
between a representative of the labor move- 
ment of Buffalo and one of the so-called 
owners, with a view of settlement of the 
trouble as far as his line was concerned. 
This is what appeared on the surface, but at 
the bottom of the affair it is believed that 
this owner was speaking for more than him- 
self, and I think that later developments 
have proven this to be so. We were in ses- 
sion one day longer than otherwise, but we 
were expecting an answer from this owner, 
but it did not show up ; so we adjourned 
Friday evening, after it had been decided 
that I should go along the line, as far as 
Chicago at any rate. 

I left Buffalo and visited Conneaut. Here 
I found conditions about the same as last 
year, the docks entirely enclosed by a high 
fence, but the place is well picketed. Very 
effective work is hard to do. All that can be 
done is to tell the men of the strike. Just 
at the entrance of the dock we have a small 
picket shack, in which are always several 
pickets. They have a buzzer which is start- 
ed whenever any scab is in sight. No man 
can pass the place without being informed 
of the strike. A good many men arc gotten 
away from the Lake Carriers through these 
means. A launch is constantly kept on the 
move, putting literature on board all vessels. 
The launch is stoned at times, and once was 
nearly sunk by black oil being turned into 
the launch, but it is all considered a part of 
the day's work. 

I next visited Ashtabula and found the 
conditions there much the same as in Con- 
neaut. All this time, it must be remem- 
bered, I had good opportunity of observing 
the class of men that they are getting for 
the steel boats. The majority are mere 
boys. I saw many in Conneaut and in Ash- 
tabula who were still wearing short trousers. 

Cleveland was my next stopping place. 
This is the most important place for picket 
work on the Lakes, and a large number of 
pickets are at work there, sailors, firemen 
and cooks all doing their bit. One man has 
been appointed over them, known as captain 
of pickets, and he devotes all his time in pla- 
cing the men and keeping them busy. I 
should say that the whole town is well picketed 
and done in a systematic way, and much good 
is being accomplished. I could not see or sug- 
gest any improvement. 

I next visited Detroit. There is not much 



opportunity to do anything here, as nearly all 
of the vessels sailing out of this town are 
union. However, nearly all of the steel boats 
have to pass through this port. After look- 
ing over the picket lines I went over to the 
park, close to which all vessels have to pass. 
I secured a pair of marine glasses and re- 
mained all the afternoon until after dark, and 
had a splendid chance to observe the kind of 
crews that are employed on deck of the ore 
carriers, and while occasionally I could make 
out a grown man, the most part of the deck 
crew were mere boys. Of course, you under- 
stand that I was unable to see the fire-room 
crew, as the vessels were under way at the 
time of observation. It is surprising how they 
can get along with the class of men that I ob- 
served on nearly all of these vessels. 

Chicago was my next port. Here I had an 
opportunity of seeing a large number of pho- 
tographs taken by the pickets in the different 
ports, and it is the same story — boys, boys, all 
the time, with an occasional man among them. 
In South Chicago I had the fortune to be 
there on Labor Day and saw the parade. As 
the parade passed the Lake Carriers' shipping- 
office, banners were dropped and so were the 
flags, and the band directly behind the Seamen, 
employed by the Teamsters, halted and played 
one of the most doleful funeral dirges that I 
have ever listened to ; all of the following 
bands either played dirges or funeral marches 
in passing this office. 

One of the most interesting things that 
came under my notice while in Chicago was 
brought in by one of the pickets. It was a clue 
bill, or rather, I should say a blank due bill, 
payable by the Pittsburg Steamship Company, 
to the Lake Carriers' Association, for the pay- 
ment of supplying men on board of vessels. 
Now, inasmuch as this was gotten from a man 
that was bound for one of the so-called inde- 
pendent lines, it puts another aspect on the 
matter. Bearing this in mind on my way back 
to the Coast, I stopped over in Buffalo for a 
few hours, and was there shown a letter from 
the owner of one of the so-called independent 
lines to a representative of the labor move- 
ment, in which he broke off negotiations for 
a settlement for his line. It is significant 
TH.'VT THE Pittsburg Steamship Company 

HAS undertaken TO BEAR THE EXPENSES OF 
ALL THE OTHER LINES, TO PREVENT THEM FROM 
MAKING A SETTLEMENT WITH THE UNIONS IN- 
VOLVED. Now this looks to me like progress, 
and it assures us that we are really fighting 
the Steel Trust. 

I wanted to go further up on the Lakes, as 
far as the Soo, but pressing business called 
me back to New York, where I met Comrade 
Furuseth on his arrival from Europe, whose 
report will shortly be published in the Jour- 
nal. 

Taken as a whole, the situation on the Lakes 
looks good, and our chances to win are good. 
So far it has been impossible to get men for 
the Lakes. It is reported that many men have 
been leaving New York for the Great Lakes, 
but I am of the opinion that the system that 
has been adopted in New York for picket duty 
will prevent many from going. It is certain 
that no man can leave that port without know- 
ing just where he is going and what he is 
going to do. What is puzzling to me, if many 
men are leaving the Coast for the Lakes, what 
becomes of them ? They certainly are not on 
the steel ships, or I should have seen some of 
them. As I said, they do have some men, but 
they are few and far between. 

Fraternally yours, Wm. H. Frazier, 

Sec.-Treas. I. S. U. A. 

Boston, Mass., September 15, 1910. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, I'A 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Subdivisions. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, lyi Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Maritime Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 143 West Madison St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Australasia. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
■ Wharf, Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 
Great Britain. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E., 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull. 

Belgium. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Diepestr 
152, Antwerpen, Belgium. 

Germany. 

Zentralverband Seemannischer Arbeiter, Ham- 
burg 1, Bensenbinderhof 57, IV., Zimmer 54 
(Gewerkschaftshaus), Germany. 

France. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place de l.i 
Joliette. 

Norway. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund, Stavanger, Norway. 

Sweden. 
Svenska-Sjomens-og Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 
Denmarlt. 
Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Holdbod- 
gade 11, Kid., Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Told- 
boldgade 8, Denmark. 

Holland. 
Algcmccne Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, 2 e 
Atjchstr. 6, Amsterdam. 

Italy. 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Mare, 
Genova Vico Casosini, No. 8, Italy. 
Austria. 
Vcrband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
bciter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

Spain. 
Federacion Nacional de Obrcros de Mar de 
Buques V puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 (Bar- 
celoneta), Spain. 

Uruguay. 
Socicdad de Resistencia de Marineros, Monte- 
video, Rampla 103, Uruguay. 

Argentina. 
Lega Obrera (Sailors and Firemen) Sinforiano 
Corvetto. Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos) 
und Suarez 44. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



A dispatch from Teheran, Persia, 
states that the servants of the Shah's 
palace have gone on strike and are 
clamoring for the wages due them. 

Piecework is being strenuously op- 
posed by the Sydney (Australia) 
branch of the Federated Butchers' 
Union. 

As an antidote to the poison of 
sweating, the Victorian (Australia) 
hospital attendants have formed a 
union. 

The coal miners of Newcastle, N. 
S. W., propose to raise money to send 
their imprisoned union leaders away 
on a holiday when they are released. 

Application for registration under 
the Australian Commonwealth Con- 
ciliation and Arbitration Act has been 
made by the Federated Woolen Mills 
Operatives' Union. 

The Woolen Mills Operatives' 
Union in Victoria, Australia, has 
made application for registration 
under the Commonwealth Conciliation 
and Arbitration Act. 

The general strike in Spain, de- 
clared on August 31 by the committee 
of the Workmen's Federation, was 
called ofT on September 6, because of 
the failure of the coal miners' strikes 
at Bilbao and Zarag. 

The Colton (Eng.) mil) operatives 
not having complied with the demands 
of their employers, arrangements are 
being made by the latter for a mass- 
meeting, when a general lockout will 
be recommended. 

The strike of the tramway employes 
at Perth, West Australia, still con- 
tinues. The efforts of the company to 
procure scabs having proved futile, 
an effort is now being made to settle 
the dispute by conciliation. 

A campaign of "passive resistance," 
the Australian equivalent of a strike, 
went into effect throughout the South- 
ern Railroad system on September IS, 
in consequence of a wage dispute be- 
tween the employes and the owners. 

At Collie, West Australia, recently, 
all the men employed at the Cardiff 
colliery ceased work in sympathy 
with a blacksmith named Jones, who 
had been dismissed on the ground of 
alleged unsatisfactory work. 

The New Zealand Trades and Labor 
Council's Conference rejected by a 
large majority a motion to identify 
itself with the Socialistic movement, 
and adopted a platform practically 
identical with that of the Australian 
Labor party. 

Despite all the reports of North 
Queensland sugar growers regarding 
shortage of labor for the can season, 
tjie Government inspectors' reports 
for June show that workers are every- 
where in sufficient supply, and in some 
districts much in excess of demands. 

At the District Court, Bundaberg, 
Queensland, recently, two members of 
the Butchers' Union recovered £18 
7s. 6d. with £2 4s. 2d., and £21 9s. 2d. 
with £2 9s. 2d. costs respectively, 
from a master butcher, for back pay 
under the wages board award. 

An endeavor is to be made by the 
Electrical Trades Union of New 
South Wales to secure the co-operat- 
tion of the Electrical Traders' Union 
in preferring a request to the Minister 
of Labor that a wages board should 
be appointed for the trade- 

Of industrial unions of workers, 
Wellington has the leading position 
with a membership of 20,582. The 
other provinces claim the following: 
Auckland, 13,075; Canterbury, 9549; 
Otago and Southland, 8209; Westland, 
2581; Marlborough, 264; Nelson, 183, 
and Taranaki, 76. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Union Made Clothing for Sea Faring Men 



MEN'S SUITS MADE TO ORDER 
First Class Goods Low Prices 



F. M. & C. B. CANNON 439 Front, 440 Beacon St., San Pedro 



BEN. B. LIPPMAN 

S3 2 BEACON & S3 1 FRONT, nmxt to Fritz & Erneat 
SAN PEDRO CAL. 

COMPLETE SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

Union Goods for Union Men 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO, 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect eur 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BRO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 1S86, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am In position to know the class of goods you want The San Francisco 
Hickory Bhlrt at tO cenU. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Oranga, N. J. 
\AARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room IB, Naw York, N. Y. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street, 

Between Front and Beacon 8ts., 

SAN PEDRO. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., OPP. ». P. DBPOT, 

■AN PEDRO, CAL. 



WALK^OVER SHOES 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 

LEVY'S DEPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

515 Front St. 514 Beacon St. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers In 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories. 
NO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Fred Bjorn or Bjornsen, a native of 
Trondjem, Norway, is requested to 
communicate with his brother, H. J. 
Bjornsen. Address H. J. Bjornsen, 
Well Street Sailors' Home, London 
E., England. 

Fritz Schmalkuche, who in March 
last was employed on board the Amer- 
ican schooner Endeavor, bound for 
San Pedro, is inquired for by the 
German Consul, 201 Sansome street, 
San Francisco. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Soren P. Nielsen, a native of 
.-\arhus, Denmark, born 1887, is in- 
quired for by his sister. Address, 
Danish Consulate, New Orleans, La. 

Arthur Taplett, age 18, last heard 
from at Wilmington, N. C, in April, 
1908, is inquired for by relatives. 
Please forward any information con- 
cerning him to Mrs. Eleanor M. Her- 
man, R. F. D. No. 4, Box 310, Ta- 
coma. Wash. 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Alro, Oscar Le Bloa, Sylvian 

Anderson, T. -557 Larsen, J. -1542 

Anderson, J. G. Michelson, J. 

Abeli, B. Moss, A. 

Andersson, G. -41 Menz, Paul 

Andersen, A. M. Meyer, H. 

-1055 Moore. J. M. 

Andersen, A. 1447 Mesak, Eduard 

Anderson, J. -1514 McDonougli. W. 

Adams, Jacob Marotli, Richard 

Ainbearnsen, Algoy Mueller, Hugo 

Apps P Nielsen, Sivert 

Anderson, Martin Nielsen, A -1054 

Anderson, Charlie Newman. David 

.\n<i..ison. Gust Nevander. Alex. 

Anderssen. Frank ^.^'^""- John C. 

Anderson. Carl Nordgren. Chas. 

Arrhenius, Chas. ^?,^*°'"' J^''??.'? 

Behrend. F. C. Nilsen, J. -780 



Birry, James 
Eackman, Ernest 



Nord, Emil 
Norman, L. 
Nelson, Eddie 
Nicholas, Thomas 



Brander, W. 

Bostrom, W. Nvstrom R 

Bentsen, Hans nhici^ vii:,^^,, 

Boylan. C. J. (pkg) Rr'^S"p^''i^?'"^'^ 

Blumquist, C. H ■ » 'd' ,,„„ 

BorUjelm, Alex. Olsson. A. P- -1109 

Bowman, K. Hj. 9^^"- ?• '^^^ 

Beyerly. Rupert 9l!^"' ^■^. 

Bell. Frank M. Ottesen. Chas. 

Carlson, Carl Opperman, W. 

Christensen. M. S,^'^^' 9?^ ^ . 

Christiansen. Eigil Hl^,®"' ^agbart 

Christenson. H. R!''^^"'„ . • 

Dibble, P. W. O sen, Pete 

Eugene. John « sen, George A. 
Einanuelsen, A. -eei^J'sso"- V" . 

Erickson. John ^ spn, Ole A 

EricksseA. J. E. ?Ll\°"' '^Sl^,'^""^^ 

Fletcher, Billy S h ' »? f^il> 

Fasie Don Peachman, Geo. 

FHtlkeirS, R. gT°"' ^7-% ,1., 

Frantsen, N. -562 E!1^„T"a^- nn^"" 

Gustavsen. Gustav ?fr!°";„'^T;'.Ji 

Graham, L. M. Peter.son, John 

Gunwalds, G. ?'^*^^?°"w^' 

Gustafson, John i^eratis, in 

Gronvold.' Peter lllUlt^- 5^^°, 

Gustafson, Johan S!',t"!."' Vf^^*^ 

Gutman, E. ^^'\%n% ' 

Henriksen, Albert -r^'r . ,, 

Hogstrom, A. Peterson, A. K 

Heckman. Fred Persson, Hj -1230 

Hedlund, Arvid S®"''"°"'^*^*^?^io 

Haltnes, Magnus Petersen C. -109- 

Hansen, H. -2060 E^*''"''"'*°Ji'^VT/^- „ 

Heide, Tom Petersen, M. (Pack- 

Hjelt, Nick T,,^^^^o , 

Hillig. Albert 5'°v,"'.,^''"' i ^r 

Helmar. O. (Pack- Robshani, J. W. 

„„p> Raymond, J. 

Hansin. Carl g°^^t"' =?iirn ^^ 

Harris. John E. ?°J^°"' Stejf" 



Hilke, Carl 



Strom, Oscar 



Hansen, Peter K. 



Sorensen. M. 
HqcojIi n Sievers, Herman 

Hansen, t -794 |?j:f "««?.• 'vf it 

Hansen, Hans St^ ll' Everett 



Husby. Lars 



Shelenz, Hans 



Isaacksen, Krlsten forensen. C. -1607 

Isaacson. Gustav |S?";,„^- 9.':°t 
Ingebretsen. O. -125 |P!,^J:'"S' Gustav 

John, Robert l'"lPu°"i„I;'- ^■ 
Johansen, C .M. -ISSSfj" '•?■ ;l°"" .^nr 

JanscheWitz, J. iJ.tL"^„t'?' t^^'L 

J°'-"--- A. -1S74 Irdr^Alb'e^rT'' 

Janson, G. W. Qnorlnpn H 

Johansen Herluf ffe^han 'M^' 

Johnstadt, J. S. samson, Kristian 

Johnsen, A. G. Svensen, G. -1579 

Johansson A. -2050 schlosser, L. 

Jensen. 1311 SJostrom, Gus 

Johnson. O.B. Schutte. Richard 

iohan?en''x-1462 it,-,rF^K '"' 

Kinsey, W. A. -207 i"?V"; '**„ , 

Kolkih Fred f^hluter, Paul 

Kopp, Franz 1,?,'?^='"^'*.^*'^^ °- 

Kustel, Victor ,TL"'"'^"' ^- ?' 

Keilman, Joe 'Ihomas Paul 

Koso. Pete Thor, Walno 

Kusik, M. Tetter, Anton 

Kleishman. F. Tufte. A. Paulsen 

Kallas. Alex. Tuominen. Alfred 

Kristensen, Jens Touanne, Walter 

Kallas, M. Utby, Carl 

Larsen, Martin '^'?."^^!!'"'„E'^; 

Larson, Jack ^If,''^"- E\,f " w 

Lindegard, John S '-"f "®"'r.)^- i^" 

Lewis, George H. :S'?**''S; Charles 

Larsen. Klaus L. Wrig Ferdmand 

Leith. Chas. Wychgel, J. 

Louis, Michael TVerner, Henry 

Larsen, Chris. T. Wallace, Luke 

Larsen. Christian Wilemsen. H. 

Lange, Freidrich Youngren, E. 

Lyohe. Harris Zorning, Arthur 

Lang. Gust. Zornow. Herbert 



When Drinking Beer 
See tliat tliis Label is 
on tile Keg or Bottle 




ALL LOS ANGELES BEER 
IS UNFAIR 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The screw steamer Homer, G. W. Harris mas- 
ter, was enrolled at the San Francisco Custom- 
house on September 21 for the coasting trade. 

The bark St. Katherine arrived at San Francisco 
on September 11, twenty-eight days from Uga- 
shok. The vessel brought 30,000 cases and 350 
barrels of salmon. 

The schooner Premier, Captain Frey, of the 
Alaska Packers' Association, arrived at San Fran- 
cisco on September 11, twenty-eight days from 
Nushigak. She brought 16,000 barrels of salmon. 

Taking the place of the Alaska-Pacific steamer 
Watson, which is undergoing repairs at Seattle, 
the steamer Jeannie left the Sound last Monday 
for San Francisco. She will carry freight, but no 
passengers. The Watson will resume service Oc- 
tober 7, when she will leave Seattle. 

Officers of the American bark Berlin, which 
arrived at Portland on September 13 with salmon 
from Alaska, report that when eighty miles ofif 
Unimak Island the vessel encountered such a 
heavy rain of black volcanic ashes that all mem- 
bers of the crew were forced to seek shelter. 

George Dettners has been appointed master of 
the steamer Tiverton, vice Samuel Bonifield. 
Schooner Repeat, H. C. Grimm master; screw 
steamer Prentiss, V. Iverton master; screw 
steamer Aberdeen, H. M. Rees master, were en- 
rolled at San Francisco on September 16. 

The final steamer for Fairbanks left Dawson, 
Yukon Territory, on September 24, carrying the 
last mail and passengers that will reach the gold 
camp by water this year. Ice is already forming 
in the Yukon, and the miners are preparing for 
the long dark winter. 

The United States Army transport Warren, 
which went ashore on the coast of Batangas 
province, in Southern Luzon, has been refloated. 
The transport Sheridan, which assisted in the 
task of dragging the vessel off tlie rocks, returned 
to Manila, and sailed for San Francisco on Sep- 
tember 16. 

The establishment of a naval hospital at the 
Naval Training Station at Yerba Buena Island, 
San Francisco Bay, is expected to be one of the 
results of the coming visit of Surgeon-General 
Charles F. Stokes, chief of the department of 
medicine and surgery of the United States Navy 
Department. 

Three collisions occurred in the vicinity of San 
Francisco on September 22, due to fog. The ship 
Tacoma was run into by the steamer Isthmian 
outside the Heads and seriously damaged. The 
steam-schooners Grays Harbor and Redondo, and 
the steam-schooner and bark McLaurin were also 
in collision. 

Six salmon packets arrived at San Francisco on 
September 15, as follows: W. B. Flint, Nusha- 
gak; Star of England, Naknek; Star of India, 
Nushagak; Indiana, Nushagak; Emily F. Whitney, 
Nushagak; Centennial, Koggiung. These vessels 
brought a total of 201,088 cases of canned salmon 
and 1500 barrels of salmon. 

Advices received at San Francisco on Septem- 
ber 24 state that the British steamer Delmira, 
from Antofagasta for Baltimore, which was ashore 
in the Straits of Magellan, has been floated and 
is at Punta Arenas, having arrived there under 
her own steam. It is reported that the vessel's 
bottom is much damaged. 

Reporting the loss of a seaman and heavy gales 
off Cape Horn, the German ship Claus, Captain 
Koehler, 163 days out from Hamburg, arrived at 
San Francisco September 18. On July 19, accord- 
ing to the ship's log. Otto Dreyer, a seaman, 19 
years of age, either jumped overboard or was car- 
ried into the sea and drowned. 

Residents of Tillamook promised at a confer- 
ence recently held with Major Jay J. Morrow, 
corps of engineers. United States Army, to con- 
tribute $650,000 to the fund needed to make that 
port accessible to ships of a draft of twenty feet 
or more. It is roughly estimated that the project 
will cost something like $2,000,000. 

M. S. McGovern has been appointed master of 
the steamer Excelsior, vice H. C. Nason; W. A. 
Elsasser of the steamer Herald, vice Enos Fou- 
ratt, Jr.; M. J. Madsen of the steamer Samos, 
vice C. J. B. Boye; George Richter of the 
schooner Verbena, vice J. C. Jochim, and J. J. 
Button of the steamer John A. Britton, vice F. 
Briggs. 

The codfishing schooner Joseph Russ, Captain 
Foss, of the Robinson Codfishing Company's 
fleet, returned to Anacortes on September 15 from 
Behring Sea with 185,000 fish. Sam Osman, mate, 
had the highest record by catching 160,000 fish. 
One of the crew deserted at Nelson's Lagoon in 
a dory during a dense fog while ten miles from 
shore. He was never heard from. 

Bringing 13,600 cases of salmon and 1465 bar- 
rels of salmon, the packet Star of Chili arrived 
at San Francisco on September 13, twenty-five 
days from Naknek. Three hundred white and 
Asiatic cannery hands and fishermen returned on 
the vessel. Captain Peterson reported that he 
v/as ten days beating through Unimak Pass 
against head winds. 

R. H. A. Mather has been appointed master of 
the bark S. C. Allen, vice C. H. Miller; W. P. Mc- 
Carthy of the schooner Carrier Dove, vice J. H. 
Ross; F. H. Crothers of the steamer Hercules, 



vice H. G. Bell. The screw steamer Willapa, G. 
Johnson, master; steamer Norwood, J. I. Martin, 
master, and schooner Benicia, A. Wilson, master, 
were enrolled at San Francisco on September 13. 

Captain Burley and Robert McCullough of the 
Tacoma Tug and Barge Company recently re- 
fused an offer to combine the tugboat interests 
of Puget Sound. The offer came from a London 
man who desired to get control of the Tacoma 
Tug and Barge Company and the Puget Sound 
Tugboat Company. With these companies as a 
basis he expected to bring all the other companies 
together. 

The 500 tons of scrap iron, relics of machinery 
and gear used in the French operations on the 
Panama Canal, shipped to San Francisco by the 
Government, was sold at auction on September 
13. The buyers were M. Levin & Co., their bid 
being $5040. The price received is said to be less 
than can be had in New York. Wherever the 
Government can get the best price the remainder 
of the scrap will be shipped. 

The steamers Aorangi and Maitai, which are to 
operate between San Francisco and Australia, 
will, upon their arrival at the former port in the 
next couple of months, be equipped with United 
wireless systems of the two kilowatt variety. The 
tankers Roma and Whitter of the Union Oil Com- 
pany are shortly to be equipped with the appa- 
ratus, as is also the steam-schooner Carlos of the 
J. Flomer Fritch Company. 

Charles Sperry, lighthouse superintendent at 
San Pedro, who has completed installation of the 
temporary five-way lens red light at the end of 
the breakwater, states that he will also install a 
temporary fog bell there. Several changes in the 
lighthouse service are contemplated at San Pedro, 
including a gas buoy at the channel entrance and 
a revolving or flashing light in place of the fixed 
light at Point Firmin. 

y\nton Anderson has been appointed master of 
the schooner Margaret, vice Andrew Olsen; W. 
H. Perkins master of the schooner Champion, 
vice William P. Russell, and P. M. Koffold of the 
steamer Quinalt. The following enrollments have 
been announced: Schooner Rival, S. Sorenson, 
master; stern wheel steamer Pride of the River, 
E. Atthowe, master, and gas steamer Petroleum, 
J. W. Atlner, master. 

The steam whaler Karluk, Captain F. S. Cottle, 
has made one of the best hauls in many seasons, 
according to cable advices received from the 
North by Stabens & Friedman, the outfitters. 
The Karluk arrived recently at Nome, where she 
transferred 33,000 pounds of bone, worth $165,000, 
to the steamer Umatilla, which carried it to Seat- 
tle. The bone is now on the way to the Eastern 
market, where it brings $5 a pound. 

The survey steamer Explorer has finished her 
work in Bristol Bay, Alaska, and will proceed to 
Honolulu. Three of the remaining five boats will 
soon come from Alaska to Puget Sound, while 
two will winter in the North. On returning from 
Cook's Inlet the survey steamer Patterson will 
spend the winter making observations in the 
Straits of Fuca. The survey steamer Yukon will 
winter at Port Graham, The steamer Gedney, 
working in Wrangel Narrows, has charted sev- 
eral reefs on the inland passage. She will winter 
on the Sound. The steamer Taku, working on 
Prince William's Sound, will winter at Cordova. 
The steamer McArthur will come south. 

The Pacific Mail Company on September 22 
made an official announcement of its new schedule 
for the Panama run. Instead of the weekly sail- 
ings, in the future a steamer will be dispatched 
every ten days, carrying freight and passengers, 
which will make the customary ports of call. The 
vessels in this service will be the Acapulco, San 
Juan, Panama, Newport, Peru, San Jose and City 
of Sydney. The Acapulco, leaving on October 5, 
will inaugurate the new passenger and freight 
service. The steamer.s Pennsylvania, Para and 
Aztec have been selected for the direct freight 
service to Ancon, sailing every fifteen days. The 
Pennsylvania is scheduled to leave out September 
30 on her new run. 

The great breakwater at San Pedro, which rep- 
resents an expenditure of many millions and ten 
years of continuous labor, is complete, and the 
structure will be turned over to the Government 
October 1. The breakwater is 9250 feet long. It 
has a width of twenty feet at the top, and a mean 
width of 200 feet at the bottom. At tiic outer end 
the depth of water measures forty-eight feet. The 
structure is topped with concrete 40x40x20, on 
which a permanent liglif and fog station will be 
erected. Nearly 2,500,000 tons of rock were used 
in the sub-structure of the breakwater, and 232,- 
600 tons in the superstructure. The rock alone 
cost $2,748,690. There are sufficient funds left to 
extend the breakwater 750 feet further. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims of 
all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg , Third Floor, California St., near 
Montgomery. Telephones, Kearny 394; Home, 
C 3832. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 

1% Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 221 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumalne St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK. N. Y.. 28 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA. Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St.* 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumalne St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK. N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 674 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O.. 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies: 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbrldge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 
ERIE, Pa., 328 German St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111.. 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St., N. W. 
CHICAGO. 111., 316 W. Kinzle St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbrldge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed SL 
ASHTABULA, O., 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, O., 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, O., Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis.. 1814 Fourth St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Fraser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO. O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY. Mich.. 919 Water SL 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 242 South Water St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. 317 Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency: 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLT AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 
One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six montiis 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



n.oo 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all comraunications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the .JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The .lOURNAI^ Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscfipt. 



WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 28, 1910. 



THE "LABOR SITUATION." 



The "labor situation" in San Francisco has 
been the subject of much thought and many 
suggestions during the recent past, all, of 
course, with the view of "improving trade." 
Times are dull ; no doubt about that. Prob- 
lem : How to improve them. 

Thus far the only answer points in a single 
direction, namely, a reduction of wages, a 
lengthening of hours, or some other step to- 
ward "equalizing" labor conditions in San 
Francisco and other localities. In a word, it 
is suggested that the best way to make times 
good for everybody is to make them bad for 
labor! The lower the wage rate and the 
longer the workday, the more money every- 
body will have for circulation in the "channels 
of trade"! Somehow we don't seem to be 
making much headway in the solution of our 
problem. 

Additional interest has been given the dis- 
cussion by the arrival in San Francisco last 
week of Charles M. Schwab. That gentle- 
man's published views are both encouraging 
and discouraging. He assures us that the gen- 
eral conditions in San Francisco are favorable 
to manufacturing in the metal trades. "In re- 
gard to materials and power," says Mr. 
Schwab, "there is nothing in our conditions 
which prevents effective competition with 
other industrial centers." Then why do we 
not compete? Ah, there's the rub! 

Mr. Schwab points out the one difficulty, 
the insuperable obstacle to competition with 
other industrial centers. Mr. Schwab will not 
undertake to produce in this city anything 
which can be produced anywhere else "so long 
as the unions insist on the hours and wages 
now prevailing." A further obstacle, in the 
opinion of Mr. Schwab, is that the unions 
"restrict output." San Francisco is "obsessed 
by unionism," therefore the city must be pun- 
ished by the withdrawal of such business as 
Mr. Schwab and his associates are in a posi- 
tion to control ! 

Reduce wages, lengthen the workday, and — 
most important of all — destroy the unions, and 
San Francisco will receive the favor of the 
Steel Trust. The Union Iron Works will be 
re-opened, and the forge and anvil will again 



make melody for the lovers of "free labor" ! 
As to the fate of labor itself — that's another 
story. The story of labor under the rule of 
the Schwabs is very well told in an article re- 
cently published in the Daily News, of San 
Francisco, under the caption, "Humanity or 
More Thaws ? What Price Shall We Pay for 
'Our Industries'?" We herewith reproduce 
the News article in full, as follows : 

Lower wages. Longer hours. Unrestricted 
output, or pacemaking. 

These are the price of a revival of the ship- 
building and iron manufacturing industry in San 
Francisco, says a morning spokesman for Chas. 
M. Schwab. It naively remarks that "The inter- 
est of the metal workers, however important, is 
as nothing compared with the general public in- 
terest in the growth of OUR industries." 

Surely that has a familiar sound. How long 
ago was it that Carnegie and Geo. F. Baer, pres- 
ident of the Reading railroad, thanked God for 
having placed in their hands the benevolent rule 
of the working people of Pennsylvania? Frank 
Hoffstot at Schoenville, and this same Chas. 
Schwab at the Bethlehem steel works — have we 
not heard them drumming down the hungry cries 
of little children, the shrieks of outraged daugh- 
ters, and the groans and curses of helpless, igno- 
rant mill slaves with their battle roll of "indus- 
trial conquest"? Twenty thousand working fami- 
lies are starving in Pcnn.«ylvania to-day because 
the growth of "our industries" has been the first 
thought of the rulers of that State. 

WHOSE industries? Why, Schwab's, and Car- 
negie's, and HofTstot's. Industries that raise the 
price of the product by manipulation of venal 
Congressmen; industries that produce a Thaw 
family, and Pittsburg, the industrial inferno of 
the twentieth century. 

"It is for labor," says our scholarly commen- 
tary, "to consider whether or not it shall heartily 
and in good faith unite with employers in re- 
ducing our unit costs of products so that this city 
can compete with other centers. It can be done 
if both try, and still leave labor far more satis- 
factorily situated than elsewhere in this country. 
It is useless to say that our conditions are what 
they ought to be. and that other centers should 
come to them. Other centers will not come to 
them, and that is all there is of it." 

That is NOT all there is of it. Surrender to a 
lower standard of living, degradation of American 
manhood for the sake of producing more Schwabs 
and Coreys and Newport aristocracies, at the 
whole shameful price here proposed is NOT all 
there is left. 

There is THE COURAGE OF THE WORK- 
ING PEOPLE left. 

Better that California remain for another fifty 
years an agricultural State than that one such 
blot as Schoenville of the Bethlehem slaughter- 
house be found here. As one man, the working 
people of San Francisco will answer that lower 
wages and longer hours shall be kept beyond the 
mountains. Competitive fields will be organized 
and THEIR wage standard raised. Human life 
will be made worthy of consideration in Penn- 
sylvania. Then will the industry develop in San 
Francisco, on an equal basis — not of oppression 
but of justice and right. 

WHY DO WE NOT HEAR OF SCHWABS 
AND THEIR LOCAL ALLIES TRYING TO 
PERSUADE THE MANUFACTURERS IN 
LOS ANGELES, PORTLAND .\ND SEAT- 
TLE TO GRANT FAIR CONDITIONS TO 
THEIR EMPLOYES, INSTEAD OF USING 
THE DEGRAD.\TION OF THOSE CITIES 
AS AN EXCUSE FOR DEGRAD.^TION 
HERE? 

Why must the whole sacrifice of industrial 
growth be made by the worker, already overladen 
as he is with the high cost of living? 

Why is it that our "captains of industry" al- 
ways plead with the workingman to kneel lower 
in the dust, so that they may step higher from 
the level of our forgotten equality of rights? 

Wages will go not lower. Hours will not be 
lengthened. Men will be employed, but under 
conditions favorable to their own lives, instead 
of to the fortunes of their exploiters. 

For this is the law of human evolution. 

"Pretty tough," the reader will say. Un- 
doubtedly ; and yet we firmly believe that the 
Daily News has correctly summed up the situ- 
ation. The Steel Trust is the Moloch of the 
age, and its victims are numbered by the mil- 
lion. To turn San Francisco over to the ten- 
der mercies of that heartless and debauched 
aggregation of plutocrats and criminals would 
be to turn the city into an Inferno of lost souls. 

Mr. Schwab talks with all the glibness of 
one schooled in the art of chicane. He knows 
very well that he is merely humbugging the 
public when he endeavors to place upon labor 
the responsibility for the lack of work in the 
metal trades. The simple fact is that the Steel 
Trust, having bought out or frozen out the 
Union Iron Works, keeps that institution 



closed because it is cheaper to do the work in 
the East, where the raw material lies at hand. 
Of course, the blow thus struck at "the 
unions" is so much grist to the Steel Trust 
mill — another bird killed with the same stone. 
Were wages reduced and the workday length- 
ened — were "the unions" destroyed beyond the 
hope of resurrection — the Union Iron Works 
would continue as silent as the grave. The 
only effect of such a condition would be to 
add to the pressure upon the workers in other 
localities to force the latter still further into 
the pit of poverty, if that be possible. So 
long as these two fundamental conditions exist 
in San Francisco, i. e., trust control and lack 
of raw material, that city will be at a disad- 
vantage which no amount of union baiting, 
however successful, will suffice to overcome. 

The hope of San Francisco and its indus- 
tries lies not in going backward and down- 
ward to the level of other localities, since there 
is no stopping place on that course short of 
industrial slavery and general poverty. No; 
the hope of San Francisco lies in the mainte- 
nance of decent conditions and persistence in 
the effort to equalize conditions in other lo- 
calities on the basis of the conditions prevail- 
ing in the former city. San Francisco must 
either fight for her manhood — being content 
to suffer, if need be, in that endeavor — or she 
must be content to go down, down to an in- 
dustrial hell and sav Schwab sent her! 



BRANDED! 



I'nder the above caption, The Worker, of 
Bri.sbane, Australia, publishes an article from 
the pen of "Cintra," which we herewith re- 
print, as follows : 

"Ten thousand of them were branded." 

.\ cable of last week contained that sentence. 
To what did it refer? To cattle? To sheep? To 
pigs? 

No; it referred to human beings! 

It was during the great shipping strike at Ant- 
werp a few months ago. Large numbers of 
strike-breakers were imported by the Shipping 
Federation, and ten thousand of them, the cable 
man now informs us without the vestige of a 
blush, were branded on the wrist with india- 
rubber stains, as the sign and symbol of their 
despicable trade. 

It is a long time since we had so flagrant an 
example of the degradation of humanity by Capi- 
talism. 

When the historian wants to. impress us with 
the demoralizing barbarity of the feudal system, 
he tells us that laborers who ran away from the 
service of their masters were brought back and 
branded with his mark. 

The awful abasement of human nature involved 
in this legalized outrage sums up for us poster- 
ity's indictment of feudalism as a social system. 

God made man in his own image and likeness. 
Divinity set its seal upon the human countenance 
and form. 

Then came along the Devil of Exploitation, and 
branded the divine like a beast. 

Capitalism, as exemplified at Antwerp, is thrust- 
ing feudalism into the shade in this devil's work. 

It brands its human tools, not as a punishment 
for running away, but as the outward and visible 
evidence of their shame in entering its service. 

Many of those strike-breakers were brought 
over in shiploads from Great Britain. They had 
been taught to bellow there, on patriotic occa- 
sions, that "Britons never shall be slaves." 

And at Antwerp they held out their wrists to 
be branded with indiarubber stains that signified 
a baser servitude than any ever inflicted upon 
bondsmen of old. 

The feudal serf could not escape his fate. He 
was the involuntary victim of a system that 
ground his manhood into the mire, and distorted 
into a blasphemous caricature his likeness to God. 

These strike-breakers, on the contrary, deliber- 
ately accepted their degradation. Knowing they 
were being used to injure the cause of fellow 
beings fighting gallantly for justice against over- 
whelming odds, they nevertheless offered them- 
selves for that work, and preferred the stain of 
the slave to the clean skin of the freeman. 

With centuries of heroic struggles for liberty 
behind them: with a national record enriched with 
the blood of men and women who have chosen 
freedom in death rather than endure bondage in 
life, these strike-breakers submitted for a few 
shillings a week to be the branded instruments of 
oppression. 

No doubt they wanted the money badly for the 
maintenance of their wives and families. Re- 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



cruited from the ranks of the hungry unemployed, 
they snapped eagerly at the chance of work and 
wages, and the prospect of putting a little bread 
in the cupboard for those they loved. 

So anxious were they that they were not de- 
terred even by the knowledge that in order to 
do so they must act the part of traitors to their 
class, and carry the stain of their traitorous oc- 
cupation visibly upon their bodies for all men to 
see. 

To this has Capitalism reduced humanity; to 
this has it corrupted the holiest instincts of men, 
that to win food for their women and children 
they will injure the just cause of their brothers. 

The first man who raised his hand against a 
brother was branded on the brow for the stern 
behoof of the world. 

But Capitalism says, "Here, come into my pay." 
And to encourage him in his fratricidal energy, it 
brands him on the wrist with the seal of its 
service. 

This article, profoundly interesting as it is, 
has a special significance for American read- 
ers. The branding system of the Shipping 
Federation has been adopted in a modified 
form by the Lake Carriers' Association. On 
the Great Lakes the system is known by the 
term "Welfare," and its outward symbols are 
discharge-books, anti-union contracts, etc. In 
essence, however, the system is the same on 
the Lakes as in Great Britain and on the 
Continent. The organized seamen of the 
Great Lakes have been fighting for three years 
against this degradation, and they will con- 
tinue to fight until they win the right to go 
to work as men, not as feudal serfs. 



The report of Comrade Furuseth on the Li- 
ternational Seamen's Conference (published in 
this issue) aflfords interesting reading, espec- 
ially in respect to the conditions existing 
among the seamen of Europe. A careful pe- 
rusal of the report justifies the hope that good 
results will flow from the Conference. At any 
rate, there is no gainsaying the added interest 
aroused among the seamen of Europe in the 
legal status of the seafaring calling. Once 
our comrades under the Old World flags be- 
come fully alive to their condition as virtual 
slaves under the laws of imprisonment for de- 
sertion, the day of that antiquated system will 
be done. For this and other blessings arising 
from the Conference may the Lord make us 
truly thankful ! 



The annual convention of the California 
State Federation of Labor, which meets in 
Los Angeles next Monday, will be the largest 
gathering in the history of that body. Several 
circumstances combine to make it also the 
most important. The labor movement of the 
State will watch the proceedings with interest, 
in the hope that they will redound to the ad- 
vantage of all concerned. With good judg- 
ment and sincere devotion to the principles of 
the labor movement, there is every reason to 
predict a harmonious and profitable gathering 
of labor's representatives. 



San Pedro, September 23. — Four deserters from 
the British bark Formosa, now discharging gen- 
eral cargo loaded at Antwerp, were arrested to- 
day. John Butcher, a stowaway, had no right 
ashore, and the others were arrested at the re- 
quest of the British Consul. They will be put 
aboard again when the bark sails. 

The foregoing is just an "unconsidered 
trifle" of news such as one may rim across al- 
most any day in the shipping columns of any 
newspaper. It is reprinted here in the hope 
that some day soon such "trifles" will cease to 
be "unconsidered" and become a matter of 
public indignation and revolt. 



For fair products of all kinds, consult the 
Journal's ad columns ! 



Demand the union label on all products ! 



REPORT ON SEAMEN'S CONFERENCE. 

(Continued from Page 2.) 



fended the whole matter upon the ground that it 
used language which is employed in every coun- 
try either in addressing parliaments, ministers of 
state or royalty, and suggested as a compromise 
that it be adopted witli a proviso that each coun- 
try might change the language of the petition to 
suit the particular form used in any particular 
country. 

Finally it was suggested that the question might 
be divided, that a vote might be taken upon the 
legislative demands by themselves and upon the 
petition by itself. A couple of delegates dis- 
credited the description of the status itself. When 
my turn came to answer I stated that it was the 
second time that this matter had been before the 
Transportworkcrs' convention. There had been 
abundant opportunity in the past two years to 
examine into the seamen's status and also com- 
pare the language used in the petition when ad- 
dressed either to parliaments or to governments. 
I did not think that there was any necessity to 
call the attention of such a gathering to the dif- 
ferent forms of contracts and the different meth- 
ods of their enforcement. However, since it 
seems necessary, I would state that there arc 
roughly speaking three forms or methods of en- 
forcing contracts to labor. The first, and oldest, 
is a contract which provides for specific enforce- 
ment — that is, the workman may be compelled by 
law, and the forces behind the law, to remain at 
work during such periods as might be specified 
in the contract. Such is the contract of the sea- 
man. He therefore has no industrial power with 
which to enforce his demands. Being either de- 
nied a vote, or being away at the time of voting, 
he ha.s practically no political weapon. .The sec- 
ond kind of a contract is usually for a definite 
period, with mutual obligation to give notice, 
usually one or two weeks. Failure to give such 
notice prior to quitting work subjects the work- 
men to a fine, and failure to pay the fine involves 
imprisonment in lieu thereof. This is a contract 
under which a great number of your members 
work. It should be well known to you. The third 
form consists of contracts, failure to perform 
which gives the injured party a right to go into a 
civil court, and prove that he has been damaged, 
the extent to which he has been damaged, and to 
have a jury or a judge assess the damages, which 
are then collected precisely like any other indebt- 
edness. I understand that the majority of the 
men whom you represent work under the latter 
system, or else under no arrangement at all, ex- 
cept that you are to be paid when you quit. It 
might be well for you practical Socialists to con- 
sider whether it be practical to make demands 
when we have no means of enforcing them, to 
make threats when we have no means of follow- 
ing them up with action. We seamen, who have 
studied our status and who know our lack of 
power, believe it to be practical to beg when it 
would be ridiculous to do anything else. You 
have this matter before you; you may divide it; 
you may adopt the one and reject the other, may 
reject both or adopt both, or you may adopt the 
substance of the petition leaving to each country 
to put it in such form as shall be customary. 

The chair thereupon suggested that a vote be 
taken upon the legislative program by itself. 
This was done, and it was unanimously adopted. 
Motion was then made that the petition be re- 
ferred to the Central Committee. This was 
amended, that it be adopted with tlie proviso that 
each country might use its own form or such 
form as it thought would be nTost suitable and 
effective. A vote was taken, and the amendment 
was adopted. Subsections b and c were then dis- 
posed of. The old officers were re-elected, and 
the convention decided to meet again three years 
from date in London, the specific date to be set 
at a later time by the Central Committee. 

On my way home I addressed meetings in Lon- 
don and Liverpool, together with Mr. Wilson, who 
stated that he was entirely satisfied with the con- 
vention and its work. 

The convention while it was sitting received 
several telegrams, among which was a telegram 
from our International Secretary-Treasurer, Mr. 
Frazier, and from the strikers of the Great Lakes. 
I may also state that the Congress was evidently 
watched with the keenest interest, because there 
was not only the usual staflf of reporters but 
there were present special representatives of the 
press and especially from Great Britain. 

In conclusion, I desire to report that I learned 
tliat Holland, Denmark and .Austria have special 
governmental commissions sitting, with instruc- 
tions to examine into existing maritime laws and 
to propose suitable amendments. I was also in- 
formed that Spain has such a commission, but 
can not report that as a fact. 

I arrived back in New York on the 10th. 
Respectfully submitted, 

ANDREW FURUSETH. 

New York, September 12, 1910. 



The steamships Ella and Erna, now being over- 
hauled at Seattle, are to be placed in service be- 
tween Puget Sound and Mexico and Crntr;il 
America beginning about November I. The firm 
of Jebsen & Ostrander, formerly operating them, 
has been dissolved. Other agents will be ap- 
pointed. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Sept. 26, 1910. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping slack. Andrew Furuseth re- 
ported upon the transactions of the International 
Transportworkcrs' Federation convention. A 
Quarterly Finance Committee was elected to ex- 
amine the Union's accounts for the past three 
months. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St. Pacific Phone Kearny 2228. 
Home Phone J 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 20, 1910. 
Situation good. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
122 Alexander St. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 19, 1910. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping fair; 
prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 19, 1910. 
Shipping medium; prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Sept. 19, 1910. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping poor; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
229^ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 141 J. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 19, 1910. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

HARRY COOK, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. 225. 



Portland, Ore., Agency, Sept. 19, 1910. 
Shipping dull. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 21, 1910. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping fair; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

JOHN W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 111. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 19, 1910. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 12, 1910. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping and pros- 
pects poor. 

CHAS. SORENSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box.314. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 22, 1910. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary re- 
ported shipping fair for waiters. Nominated dele- 
gates for the coming convention of the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union of America. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 15, 1910. 
No meeting. Shipping medium. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
P. O. Box 1335. 



San Pedro, Sept. 19, 1910. 
No meeting. Shipping slow; prospects poor; 
plenty of cooks ashore. 

ED. BARRY, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, Sept. 19, 1910. 
Strike situation continuing good. 

ALEX. McKECHNIE, Sec'y pro tern. 
674 West Madison St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Sept. 19, 1910. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary pro tern. 
\Yi.\ Lewis Street. 



DIED. 

Gustav W. Hellstadius, No. 1959, a native of 
Sweden, aged 27, died at San Francisco, Cal., on 
Sept. 22, 1910. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

(Contributed by tbe Lake Seamen's Unioni.) 




BRIGHTER PROSPECTS. 



The recent overwhelming Democratic vic- 
tories in several Republican States, and es- 
pecially in Maine, are a protest from the peo- 
ple against the high-handed conduct of the 
"powers that be," a lesson, by the way, 
that was badly needed. The tools of the big 
trusts were riding roughshod over the 
working people, and plundering the coun- 
try right and left. No longer are the Gov- 
ernment lands thrown open to settlement 
by the poor people, but are auctioned off to 
the highest bidder, thus barring a poor man 
from an opportunity to obtain any of it, or 
it is disposed of by crooked lottery. 

The result of the Maine election has an- 
other and special significance to the seamen 
of this country. Senator Hale, of Maine, 
was and is a Ship Subsidy advocate, and an 
enemy of the Seamen's bill (H. R. 11193). 
So far as I have been able to learn, not a 
single one of our friends in Congress or the 
Senate will be missing when Congress con- 
venes. So, the outlook for the adoption into 
law of our bill appears to be very good. This, 
and other circumstances, makes the outlook 
on the Lakes, from a union point of view, 
much brighter. 

I do not believe this struggle can last 
much longer. I hope to see some kind of a 
settlement before the opening of navigation 
next spring. The United States Steel Cor- 
poration will elect a new president, and sev- 
ral new directors in February, 1911, Mr. 
Carnegie, of Library and Homestead fame, 
or rather illfame, will give up his control in 
February, and it is very probable that the 
attitude of the United States Steel Corpora- 
tion toward labor will undergo a decided 
change for the better. 

I am informed that "labor troubles" are 
now impending in the Pittsburg district, 
and that the men there bitterly resent a re- 
cent cut of nearly 50 per cent, in wages. 
We all know that a cut in wages is one un- 
failing way to wake up the sleepers. The 
seamen of the world are on the verge of a 
strike, the white slaves are awakening and 
making ready to free themselves. With 
all this preparation going forward the sea- 
men of the Lakes must not be found want- 
ing. We have made a beautiful fight during 
the past three years, and we must not grow 
weary in welldoing. We must brush up our 
energies, and tighten up the belt another 
hole. 

Do not think that because you are grow- 
ing stale that we all are. Freshen up and 
keep at it ! A lot now depends upon the en- 
ergy of the officers and they especially must 
not become stale and indifferent. Remem- 
ber, comrades, it is your fight, my fight, 
the fight of every sailor, fireman and cook 
on the Lakes, and each should have a per- 
sonal interest in it. Do not say, "Well, I 
got a job on a union vessel and am off duty 
to the union." You are not off duty. You 
would not stand aside and see some one mal- 
treat your own family. Therefore you must 
not stand aside and see your union mistreat- 
ed, for your union is a part of you, part of 
"working for the Union" ; you ARE the Un- 
"working for the Union"; you are the Un- 
ion, and there are hundreds and hundreds of 



your brothers who are doing battle for you, 
men who are true as steel to themselves and 
to you. Men who ask no glory, no public 
honors, but go about their work with a si- 
lent determination never to allow the scab 
shipping-master to put the shackles on them. 
More power to them, and success ! Get busy ! 

W. H. Jenkins. 
Conneaut, O. 



LOSS OF LIFE ON LAKES. 



Hundreds of lives have been blotted out 
in tragedies attending navigation on the 
Great Lakes in the last half century. 

Some of the most startling casualties are 
enumerated below in a partial list of vessels 
lost with heavy toll of human life. There 
have been many others, while hundreds of 
men have met death singly or collectively in 
disasters where the loss of life was less 
great. 

Steamer G. P. Grififin, burned off Cleve- 
land, Lake Erie, July 17, 18.S0; 286 lost. 

Steamer Atlantic, November, 1852, colli- 
sion with steamer Ogdcnsburg, off Long 
Point, Lake Erie; more than 150 lost. 

Steamer Merchant, foundered, Lake Supe- 
rior, 1857; all on board lost. 

Steamer Lady Elgin, September 8, 1860, 
collision with schooner Augusta off Evans- 
ton, 111., Lake Michigan; 283 lost. 

Steamer Dacotah, sunk off Sturgeon 
Point, Lake Erie, November, 1860; all on 
board lost. 

Steamer Pewabie, August 9, 1865, collision 
with steamer Meteor off Thunder Bay 
Light, Lake Huron ; 30 lost. 

Steamer H. G. Coburn, October 15, 1871, 
wrecked, Lake Superior; 31 lost. 

Schooner Whitney, foundered. Lake Su- 
perior, 1872 ; all on board lost. 

Schooner Mollison, foundered, Lake Su- 
perior, 1873 ; all on board lost. 

Steamer Wanbuna, foundered, 1879, in 
Georgian Ray; 30 lost. 

Steamer Alpena, foundered in Lake Mich- 
igan, October 16, 1880; 76 lost. 

Steamer Asia, foundered. Lake Superior, 
1882; more than 100 lost. 

Steamer Manistee, foundered in Lake Su- 
perior, 1883 ; all on board lost. 

Steamer Sunbeam, foundered in Lake Su- 
perior, August 28, 1883 ; 30 lost. 

Steamer Vernon, foundered in Lake Mich- 
igan, October 29, 1887; 41 lost. 

Schooner Hume, foundered, Lake Michi- 
gan, May 21, 1891 ; all on board lost. 

Schooner Atlanta, foundered, Lake Supe- 
rior, 1891 ; all on board lost. 

Schooner Nashua, foundered, Lake Huron, 
1892 ; 14 lost. 

Steamer Western Reserve, foundered, 
Lake Superior, August 30, 1892 ; 28 lost. 

Steamer W. H. Gilcher, foundered. Lake 
I^Iichigan, 1892; all on board lost. 

Steamer J. H. Jones, Georgian Bay, No- 
vember 26, 1896; 26 lost. 

Steamer Chicora, foundered. Lake Michi- 
gan, January 21, 1895 ; 26 lost. 

Steamer Niagara, foundered off Long 
Point, Lake Erie, December 5, 1899; 12 lost. 

Steamer Baltimore, foundered off Point 
Sable, Lake Huron; 13 lost. 

Steamer Hudson, foundered, Lake Supe- 



rior, September 16, 1901 ; more than 24 lost. 

Steamer Rannockburn, Lake Superior, 
November 21, 1902; 20 lost. 

Steamer Sylvanus J. Macy, foundered off 
Port Burwell, Lake Erie, November 23, 
1902 ; 14 lost. 

Steamer C. B. Lockwood, foundered. Lake 
Erie, 1902; 10 lost. 

vSteamer Erie L. Hackley, Green Bay, 
Lake Michigan, October 3, 1903; 11 lost. 

Steamer Kaliyuga, foundered off Presque 
Isle. Lake Huron. October 19, 1905; 17 lost. 

Steamer Ira H. Owen, foundered off Apos- 
tle Islands, Lake Superior, November 28, 
1905 ; 19 lost. 

Steamer Sevona, broke in two off Apostle 
Islands, Lake Superior, September 1, 1905; 
7 lost. 

Steamer Iosco, Lake Superior, September 
3, 1905 ; 19 lost. 

Steamer Arcadia, wrecked off Pentwater, 
Lake Michigan, April 23, 1907; 14 lost. 

Steamer Cyprus, foundered, Lake Supe- 
rior, October 11, 1907; 22 lost. 

Steamer D. M. Clemson, Lake Superior, 
December, 1908; 24 lost. 

Carferry Marquette and Bessemer No. 2, 
foundered. Lake Erie, December 9, 1909; 32 
lost. 

Steamer Clarion, burned near southeast 
shoal. Lake Erie, December 6, 1909; 15 lost. 

Steamer W. C. Richardson, sunk, Waver- 
ly shoal. Lake Erie, December 9, 1909; 5 
lost. 

Steamer Frank H. Goodyear, collision 
with steamer James B. Wood, off Point Aux 
Barques. Lake Huron, May 23, 1910; 18 lost. 

Carferry Pere Marquette No. 18, foun- 
dered. Lake Michigan, September 9, 1910, 
20 lost. 



BIG SUM FOR INJURIES. 



The largest personal injury suit entered 
in the District Court for a long time was 
filed at Duluth on September 1 by William 
Leonhard again.st the Duluth & Iron Range 
Railroad. He seeks damages amounting to 
$31,360. 

He alleges that September 17, 1904, he 
was second-mate on the steamer John B. 
Cowle, which was then tied up at the ore 
docks of the railroad company at Two Har- 
bors to be loaded with ore. 

In his duties as mate, Mr. Leonhard al- 
leges, he was engaged in helping open the 
hatchways so the spouts from the dock 
could be lowered for the passage of ore into 
the boat. 

He asserts that owing to defects in the 
machinery and negligence on the part of 
the defendant company the spout was low- 
ered or fell too soon and the ore which fell 
crushed down a hatchway and injured his 
foot, which was caught beneath it. 



NEW LIFE-SAVING LAUNCH. 



A twenty-six-foot, ten horsepower twin- 
screw surfboat has been added to the equip- 
ment of the Ashtabula life-saving station. 
Some months ago the Government pur- 
chased a site on the river on which to erect 
a house for this boat, but nothing further 
has been done to date. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WILL MAKE BIG CHANGES. 



The officials of the Pittsburg & Conneaut 
Dock Company are planning many improve- 
ments for Conneaut harbor, to be made dur- 
ing the coming winter. The most important 
will be a larger winding basin. Another 
will be the erection of a fifteen-ton Hulett 
rapid unloader on dock 4. These with the 
new four-track swing-bridge being built 
across the river at the harbor will make it 
a busy place during the winter. 

The present winding basin at the harbor 
has for the past five years been out of date. 
With the old freighters it was plenty large 
enough. But when the owners started 
building 600-foot freighters it was too small. 

To do this it will be necessary to cut off 
a large piece of land off docks 1 and 4. It 
will also cause the removal of the Pittsburg 
Steamship Company's supply store. It has 
not yet been decided by the steamship com- 
pany whether to move the old structure or 
to erect a new one. With the new swing- 
bridge in place the old double-track bridge 
will be taken out. This, when the land is 
cut away and the channel dredged, will en- 
able big freighters to go out bow first in- 
stead of backing out. 



REACH DECISION ON NEW DOCK. 



Closely shrouded in mystery is the re- 
port of the special board of Army engineers 
designated to pass on the need of a fourth 
American lock at Sault Ste. Marie. Colonel 
C. McD. Townsend, engineer at Detroit, and 
Colonel H. C. Newcomer, federal engineer 
at Pittsburg, returned to Detroit from the 
Soo recently, after looking over the ground 
and having a conference with L. C. Sabin, 
canal superintendent, relating to traffic 
through the present canals. 

With Major C. S. Riche, third member, 
further sessions of the board were held in 
Detroit and Colonel Townsend was dele- 
gated to formulate the report that will em- 
body the recommendation of the board. 

After this report is prepared it will be 
submitted to the other two members for 
approval and signatures, then transmitted 
to the chief of engineers, Washington. 



NO USE FOR BIG BOATS. 



Four big car-ferries approximating $1,000,- 
000 in value, for which the Michigan Cen- 
tral Railroad will have no further use in 
about two months, when it begins sending 
traffic through the Detroit River tunnel, are 
being offered for sale to railroads that ferry 
cars across rivers. 

Two of the boats, the Transfer and De- 
troit, are steel vessels. The Transport and 
Michigan Central are iron. Each is equipped 
with three tracks and has a capacity for 
twenty-one cars. 

Removal of the Michigan Central boats 
will not clear the Detroit River of carferries 
as the Wabash, Pere Marquette, Grand 
Trunk and Canadian Pacific will continue to 
operate their boats for a time, though even- 
tually it is expected they will join in the 
use of the tunnel. 



Specifications have been approved by the 
War Department for filling in with stone 
back of the upper end of the east dike, St. 
Clair flats, and for the construction of a 
stone shield at the upper end of each dike. 



STRIKE 

ON THE GREAT LAKES 

COMRADES: 

The strike of Sailors, Firemen and Cooks 
on the Great Lakes is still on. We appeal 
to all seafaring men to assist us in persuad- 
ing seamen to stay away from the Lakes 
during this strike. 

Any reports that the strike has been set- 
tled are false. 

The Seamen of the Great Lakes are sticking to- 
gether solidly, and will keep up the battle for 
freedom and decent conditions until the fight is 
won. "God Almighty hates a quitter." (So do 
we.) 

Lend a hand, comrades, by inducing seamen to 
stay away from the Lakes while the strike is on. 
Yours fraternally, 

LAKE DISTRICT, 
International Seamen's Union of America. 

STRIKE ON THE GREAT LAKES 
KEEP AWAY! 

LAWSUIT SETTLED. 



Discontinuation of the libel against the 
steamer W. G. Pollock, of the Valley 
Steamship Company, filed in 1908 by the 
Gilchrist Transportation Company, was re- 
cently ordered by A. Gilchrist, acting as at- 
torney for the latter company, in the United 
States District Court at Detroit. 

This is taken to mean that a private set- 
tlement has been reached between the two 
companies, and expensive litigation avoided. 

The libel arose over a collision between 
the steamer Colonial of the Gilchrist line, 
and the steamer Pollock on the night of 
June 21, 1907. The accident occurred in 
the lower Detroit River, off Mama Juda 
light, the Colonial being badly damaged. 
The owners of the latter boat sued for 
$5,964. 



BLUE BOOK FOR 1910. 



The Afarine Review recently issued the 
fifteenth annual edition of the "Blue Book 
of American Shipping," which is recognized 
as the standard marine directory of the 
United States. Many new features have 
been added to the "Blue Book." The ves- 
sels of the Atlantic and Pacific seaboards 
are now segregated while the list of Lake 
vessels is, as usual, complete. There is not 
a phase of the marine industry of the United 
States in all its correlated branches that is 
not covered in the "Blue Book." Its de- 
partment of Lake commerce, especially in 
relation to the ore and coal movements, is 
much appreciated by the trade. 



The steamer Moses Taylor, bound down, 
was caught in the fog which hung over the 
upper end of the St. Clair River on August 
12, and in rounding to, she went aground 
just below the chain works in Sarnia. The 
steamer finally released herself and was 
taken to the Reid drydock, where a diver 
made an examination and found she had 
broken her shoe off close up to the stern 
post and also lost two buckets of her wheel. 



For fair products of all kinds patronize 
the Journ.\l's advertisers. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Charles Bourroughs, No. 2745, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by his father. 

Findlay J. McDonald, No. 5499, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by John D. Mc- 
Donald, Highland Park, Mich. 

Comrade Henry Blaschke. Any one 
knowing the above-named comrade please 
communicate with Jno. Rook, Jr., 2564 E. 
55th St., Cleveland. 

Roy Person, No. 12522, L. S. U., is in- 
quired for by his sister. Miss Hazel Person, 
225 Chisholm street, Alpena, Mich. 

William Young, a marine fireman, aged 
50 years, last heard of twelve years ago, is 
inquired for by his sister. Address, Mrs. 
Anna M. Mills, 644 W. 61st street, Chicago, 
111. 



MUSHROOM ANCHOR FOUND. 



While at work near the upper end of the 
new Livingstone Channel in the lower De- 
troit River, the big derrick scow No. 11, 
which is employed at clearing up boulders 
and rocks forming obstructions in the chan- 
nel bed, came across a huge mushroom an- 
chor weighing several thousand pounds, ly- 
ing on the river bottom. The anchor had 
been attached to a United States lighthouse 
gas buoy, but had evidently been snapped 
off under pressure, as the chain was broken. 

The office of the United States lighthouse 
inspector at Detroit was notified and a ten- 
der will be sent to remove the anchor. The 
anchor is thought to have belonged to one 
of the buoys that were caught in the heavy 
ice jam last fall and caried out into Lake 
Erie. The buoys were afterwards recov- 
ered in the Lake, but the anchors were 
missing. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY, 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

674 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Telephone, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Teleplione 240 South. 

BUFFALO. N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 21 High Street 

Telephone Bell 175 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 

Telephone Bell West 351. 
TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 1890. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 Third Street 

Telephone, New Phone, Broad 155 L. 

BAY CITY, Mich 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96) King Street 

ERIE, Pa 328 German Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 113 92nd Street 

Telephone 2853 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 610 Meigs Street 



HOSPITAL AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



RELIEF 
Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Ruffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Mich. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 



STATIONS. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan. Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior. Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



PAY OF CLERGYMEN. 



There were 164,830 Christian ministers in 
the United States, besides 1084 Jewish rab- 
bis, and they increase at the rate of nearly 
4000 a year. Their average salary is not so 
small as many suppose, for the sum is $663, 
and there was paid to them in 1906 a total 
of $69,667,587. Baptists and Methodists 
have more than half the whole number of 
ministers in the country, due to their very 
large number of small churches, especially 
in rural districts. 

There are in Manhattan and Brooklyn 
several scores of ministers whose salaries 
exceed $500 a year. The highest salary ever 
offered a minister to preach in New York 
and given out in a public call was $18,000 
a year and a house, ofiFered last year by the 
Fifth-avenue Presbyterian Church, and de- 
clined. Several ministers receive $15,000 a 
year, and there are a dozen or more who get 
$12,000. These salaries are the highest in 
the world. A minister in London who gets 
$3000 is near the top. In New York he is 
near the bottom. 

The Government shows the average sala- 
ries of ministers in cities having 300,000 pop- 
ulation and over for the principal religious 
bodies to be: Baptist, $1793; Congrega- 
tional, $1938; Methodist, $1642; Presbyte- 
rian, $2450; Protestant Episcopal, $1873; 
Reformed. $1938 ; Roman Catholic, $684, and 
Jewish rabbis, $1491. Curiously in Baptist, 
Methodist and Presbyterian, all bodies that 
are divided North and South, ministers in 
cities in the South having populations ex- 
ceeding 300,000 receive higher average sal- 
aries than do ministers of the same denom- 
inations in the North. The figures just 
given for the bodies named are for the 
South. Those for the same bodies North 
are $200 a year lower, the Presbyterian be- 
ing $300 lower. 

In the same bodies in the smaller cities 
and in the rural districts ministers' salaries 
run away down, the Baptist average in. the 
South being $334 a year; colored Baptists in 
the South $227 a year. 

The average salaries of Church of Christ 
Scientist readers is only $234 for the whole 
country, with $958 as the average in cities 
having 300,000 population or more. The 
Government explains this curious fact, sta- 
ting that readers are practitioners as a rule 
and are expected to earn their own support. 
In actual money received Methodist min- 
isters get most of all, their salaries amount- 
ing annually to $16,150,000. The Baptists 
receive the next largest sum, $10,323,000; the 
Presbyterians get $7,610,000, the Roman 
Catholics $6,779,000, the Episcopalians 
$4,887,000, the Congregationalists $4,154,- 
000, the Reformed $1,682,000 and the Jews 
only $801,000. 

It is estimated on the basis of these re- 
ports that in 1910 the sum of $100,000,000 is 
being paid to ministers of the United States 
in personal salaries and that congregational 
expenses, missions and extensions involve 
an outlay this year of $200,000,000 more. 
These outlays are higher than ever before. 
The Government finds the value of church 
property in New York to be $153,953,740. 
This does not include parsonages, or hospi- 
tals, or asylums, but only churches — build- 
ings used for public religious worship. It 
finds the debts upon all of them to be $19,- 
062,419, or about 12.3 per cent. In New 
York city the proportion of debts to valua- 
tion of properties on which mortgage debts 



rest is very much higher among Roman 
Catholics and Jews than among Protestants. 
— New York Sun. 



SUBSTITUTE FOR MEERSCHAUM. 



A wail is raised in Germany over the end 
of meerschaum. The Norddeutsche Allge- 
mcine Zeitung states, with what foundation 
we know not, that the beds of meerschaum 
clay in Turkey and Asia Minor are nearly 
exhausted, that other sources of supply are 
insignificant, and that we must turn to other 
materials for our pipes and cigar holders, a 
condition of things which if true will grieve 
some smokers. We have confidence enough 
in Mother Earth and human persistence to 
coimt on new discoveries whenever the 
Turkish beds give out ; if the demand alone 
does not spur on the seekers, a high pro- 
tective tarifif may bring the new beds to 
light. The Allgemeine finds comfort in the 
thought of the calabash as a substitute. 

To confirmed smokers a meerschaum pipe 
is chiefly a means of education ; it marks a 
phase that every man must go through. 
The thought and care that a college fresh- 
man puts into coloring his first meerschaum, 
the patience he must learn to exercise in the 
process, the aflFection and pride with which 
he regards it, develop his mind and fit him 
for life more than his studies or his athletics. 
It is one of the few artistic feats demanding 
leisure that are left to modern life. Its 
chief charm is that it takes time. We have 
a dim recollection of a fairy tale about an 
all powerful Russian favorite — was it Po- 
temkin? — who wanted his meerschaum col- 
ored in a hurry. He detailed his guards to 
smoke it, two hours duty for each man, and 
had his pipe black in twenty-four hours. A 
tale no smoker will credit. 

But because smoking calls for leisure the 
loss of meerschaum can only affect a lim- 
ited number. Workaday life needs some- 
thing less fragile, and to-day in the woods 
and on the water and in city offices it is the 
briar wood pipe that men are taking their 
comfort from, save those lucky enough to 
have a real corncob or the heroes that pull 
at the common clay. There is a common 
impression that Germans usually smoke 
meerschaums. They may in these days of 
the Fatherland's opulence, and most Ger- 
mans have meerschaum cigar holders that 
on state occasions replace the weichsel 
"spitz," but the real German pipe, with its 
long stem, is made of china adorned with 
sentimental pictures in color. German carv- 
ers may mourn the loss of meerschaum ; Ger- 
man smokers will not miss it much. 

All the same, there are peculiar delights 
in a meerschaum pipe that would cause re- 
gret for its relegation to museum shelves as 
an extinct curiosity could the Allgemeine's 
fears be taken seriously. The smoker is a 
philosopher, however, and will reflect that 
tobacco is good in whatever form it is taken, 
and that after all very little improvement 
has been found on the red Pocahontas clay 
in which it was first smoked by white men. 
— New York Sun. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATPORII. 



It is rumored from St. Petersburg that 
the Council of Ministers will shortly submit 
to the Duma a bill to authorize the Treas- 
ury to advance the Russian Volunteer Fleet 
the sum of $1,442,000 to acquire five steam- 
ers for establishing a fast service between 
the Black Sea and the Far East. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the clas.s of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interest for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Continued frnm Page 5.) 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C, 122 Alexander St.. P. O. Box 
1365. 

T.NCOMA. Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash., 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Quincy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 61 Union Ave. 

EUREKA. Cal., 227 First St.. P. O. Box 327. 

S.\N PEDRO. Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuajiu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
S.A.N FRANCISCO. Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
.=!EATTLE, Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 
S75. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. f.l Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. Wash., 209-210 Powell Building, P. O. 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 64. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORLA.. Ore., P. C. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN. Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORriETOWN. Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No, 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
I,ORING. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE Wash.. 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATMEN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO, Cal., 200 M St. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can he procured by seamen at 
anv of the above-mentioned places: 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S, W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



BRITISH POSTOFFICE. 

From a recent speech of the British Post- 
master-General in the House of Commons, 
the following summarized statement con- 
cerning postoffice matters of the United 
Kingdom is made : 

Fifteen millions of half-penny (1 cent) 
packets and letters are conveyed dail}' 
through the British postoffices, 250,000 tele- 
grams are dealt with each 24 hours, and 
$1,216,600 is transmitted daily by money or- 
ders and postal orders. 

The telephone business of the postoffice 
has rapidly increased, and 123 new ex- 
changes were opened in 1909. The number 
of subscribers increased last year by 12 per 
cent, and the number of conversations on 
the trunk lines by 15 per cent. Within the 
next twelve months the National Telephone 
Company, which is the principal telephone 
company in the United Kingdom, will trans- 
fer all of its rights and properties to the 
Government. The terms of the transfer 
were agreed upon some time ago, and a bill 
will be introduced early next year to facili- 
tate the transfer. 

The Postmaster-General, in speaking of 
wireless telegraphy, stated that "the pur- 
chase last autumn of the wireless telegraph 
stations round the coast had been fully jus- 
tified by results. They are working with 
complete success. Within the last three 
months the number of messages received 
and sent has doubled. I hope before long 
to have a complete ring of stations all 
round Great Britain and Ireland." He em- 
phasized the advantage to shipowners of 
the wireless system, and suggested that they 
would be well advised to proceed with the 
equipment of their ships with wireless ap- 
paratus. 

He announced an innovation in reference 
to savings banks, which he called an inter- 
esting experiment. The innovation will con- 
sist in the issuance of money boxes to the 
public from postoffices, into which people 
will be able to place their savings, and at 
intervals bring the boxes to the postoffice 
for deposit. He expressed the opinion that 
"the postoffice is becoming more and more 
closely connected with the lives of the peo- 
ple." 

He explained that the state of the treas- 
ury would not permit at this time the in- 
stitution of a penny (2 cent) postage with 
France, as the immediate loss of revenue 
was estimated at $462,000. The cost of im- 
perial penny postage, viz., $754,000, he re- 
garded a diff'erent matter, as the sum in 
this case would, in his opinion, be well ex- 
[lended for the sake of promoting the unity 
of the British Empire. 

He stated that with 200,000 men and 
women in the postoffice service grievances 
were unavoidable, and that it would con- 
tinue to be his policy to discuss all such 
matters with trade-union leaders. Associa- 
tions, he added, now ask for permission to 
bring before ihis notice individual griev- 
ances, and he stated he had agreed to this 
with one exception, viz., as to the matter of 
promotion. 

The Postmaster-General spoke of the evil 
of discharging boys who were used as mes- 
sengers in the postoffice after two years' 
work and when they were not equipped for 
any other calling, the average retiring age 
in these instances being 16 years. Of the 
I 15,400 boys employed by the postoffice, 6700 
each year cease to be employed as messen- 



gers, of whom about 4400 have to leave the 
Government service. An economy might 
be made in the number of boys employed, 
he thought, by employing girls to do their 
work when that work lay indoors, as girls 
could be continued in such employment to 
a later age than boys. He thought, how- 
ever, that possible developments in the 
transmission of messages by pneumatic 
tubes, and in certain cases of telegrams by 
telephone — written copies being delivered 
by the next post — would help to reduce the 
number of boys. 



SCOTCH COOPERATIVE STORES. 



The Dunfermline Cooperative Society was 
founded in January, 1861, and during the 
first year of the society's existence the 
transactions represented a value of $30,000 
to $35,000; the yearly cash transactions 
now amount to about $1,500,000 and the 
membership numbers 7659. The society, 
which is on a mutual-dividend and equal- 
advantage basis to the members, makes it 
possible to purchase on a cash, basis, with 
dividends payable quarterly for any profit 
on sales. The claim is made that the divi- 
dend is the profit that would otherwise go 
into the pockets of the private storekeeper 
or capitalist. It is claimed by its advocates 
that this society inculcates the principles of 
thrift among the miners and working people 
of the community, who otherwise would 
not make cash payments, as required by 
the society, thereby gradually saving suffi- 
cient to pay for homes, as is shown in a 
number of instances among the working 
class. A comparison of social conditions in 
Dunfermline and other near-by cities would 
not be unfavorable to this city, though there 
may be other features that enter into this 
question to be considered before crediting 
the Cooperative Society with this result. 

The opponents of the society comprise 
most of the private shop-keepers of Dun- 
fermline, with others more or less inter- 
ested, and some general observers. They 
say in effect that the successful establish- 
ment of the Cooperative Society has limited 
the field for private enterprise and caused 
numbers to go out of business and emigrate 
to America and elsewhere, also restricting 
to a considerable degree the assessable 
rental of property and the general income 
of the city. They fail to see how it is thrifty 
to pay more for an article merely in order 
to have the extra charge returned in three 
months in the form of a dividend. Those 
opposed to the system also claim it has 
succeeded here because of the increased 
price of coal and the improved conditions of 
labor, because of the distribution of $125,- 
000 annually in the city through Carnegie 
benefactions, and because of the ready 
money the Rosyth naval base construction 
is bringing to the town. But for these ad- 
vantages, they say, the cash paid to work- 
ing people and laborers would be, as before, 
spasmodic, and the Cooperative Society 
would have been compelled to give trust or 
restrict its trade, ultimately losing its 
strength and capital. 

However just these conclusions, the in- 
crease of the society's business brings into 
prominent and interesting contrast the co- 
operation of the bulk of the population of 
the city under one head against the efforts 
of the individual shopkeeper and the inde- 
pendent buyer— the same story in another 



form of the American department store and 
the outside storekeeper. 

If the city grows sufficiently to warrant 
it, other capital will possibly be brought in 
competition with the society's business and 
unite with the individual shopkeeper in an 
effort to secure a share, or the breakdown 
of, its thriving business. 



WORLD'S GREATEST PORT. 



So they're going to give the port of New 
York room to grow ! 

It's all settled. Congress, the Legislature, 
the City Council, the Board of Estimate and 
Apportionment and Mayor Gaynor have all 
agreed upon the plans for the Jamaica Bay 
Improvement ; most of the red tape has been 
unwound, the first installment of a series of 
appropriations that may ultimately aggre- 
gate $70,000,000, more or less, has actually 
been made, and in a very short time the dirt 
will begin to fly ; or, to put it literally, the 
mud will begin to flow. 

When it is all over, the metropolis of the 
Western hemisphere will be the world's 
greatest seaport, with the rnost extensive 
harbor, the most liberal allowance of docks 
and wharves and the most up-to-date facili- 
ties for the economical handling of freight 
to be found anywhere. Incidentally these 
things will help materially to make the city, 
the major part of which by that time will 
have moved over to Long Island for lack 
of any other place in which to spread out, 
the metropolis of the world; for by 1950, 
or sooner, it is expected to have at least 10,- 
000,000 inhabitants. Some of the more en- 
thusiastic prophets make it 20,000,000. 

At present there is not much to suggest 
a great world harbor at Jamaica Bay. The 
bay itself is a shallow sheet of water cover- 
ing an area of 16,170 acres, or twenty-five 
and a half square miles, in which a few oys- 
ters are grown and a few unsophisticated 
minnows are caught by holiday fishermen. 
Adjacent are 8500 acres of salt marsh, the 
present home of untold billions of mosqui- 
toes. There are 4200 additional acres of 
marsh land apart from the main body, ma- 
king the total area of bay and marshes 28,- 
970 acres, or forty-five and a half square 
miles, which is double the area of Manhattan 
Island. All that breaks the monotony of this 
dreary expanse at present is the aroma from 
the garbage reduction works on Barren Is- 
land at the western end of the bay. 

The new harbor is to be the tide-water 
terminus of the thousand-ton barge canal 
now being built by the State at a cost of 
$101,000,000, from Lake Erie to the Hudson 
River, which is expected to bring 10,000,000 
tons of freight to New York annually. Plans 
are already afoot to provide a short cut for 
the barges from the Hudson by way of the 
Harlem River to Flushing Bay, and thence 
by a canal eight miles long across the west- 
ern end of Long Island to Jamaica Bay, thus 
avoiding the congested waters of New York 
harbor and incidentally avoiding also possi- 
ble rough water in the lower bay. Barges 
loaded directly from Lake steamers can be 
brought alongside ocean liners, where their 
cargoes can be transferred at a minimum 
expense. — Technical World Magazine. 



An Order-in-Council has been passed, pro- 
hibiting the use of salmon nets on the Mar- 
garee River, Nova Scotia, except for ob- 
taining a sufficient number of parent salmon 
to stocl' the Margaree Salmon Hatchery. 



I2 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



1: 



News from Abroad. 



Preparations are now being made 
for the taking of the British Census, 
which will occur next spring. 

The German Government has de- 
cided definitely to abandon the Zep- 
pelin airships and confine its whole 
attention to aeroplanes. 

Cholera has appeared at Kobe. 
Japan, according to a cable report to 
the State Department from Percival 
Gassett, vice-consul at that place. 

It is reported that the engagement 
is. being arranged of the Kaiser's only 
daughter, Victoria Louise, to Arch- 
duke Karl Franz, eldest son of the 
late Archduke Otto. 

During the Egyptian National Con- 
gress, in session at Brussels, the pre- 
siding officer violently denounced 
Theodore Roosevelt for "dishonoring 
Egypt on its own soil." 

The compulsory military training 
system which Australia will enforce 
from January 1 provides for 100,(X)0 
cadets to be trained and mustered 
into the citizen soldiery. 

There were thirty-six new cases of 
cholera and thirty deaths in St. 
Petersburg on September 22. Among 
those who are ill is Herr Feiselau, a 
member of the staflf of the German 
Embassy. 

At the age of 66 years, Sarah 
Bernhardt made her first appearance 
in a London music hall on September 
19 in the second act of Rostand's 
"L'Aiglon" before an immense audi- 
ence. 

Ruiz Valarino, Spanish Minister of 
Justice, in reopening the Cortes on 
September 15, announced the early 
abolition of the death penalty and 
said that numerous modifications 
would be adopted for the purpose of 
simplifying the civil and military 
codes. 

The great feat of crossing the 
snow-capped Alpine barrier between 
Switzerland and Italy in a heavier- 
than-air machine was accomplished 
on September 23 by George Chavez, a 
Peruvian aviator. Chavez was sub- 
sequently injured while making a 
landing. 

OflScial and positive denial has been 
made of the recent statement that a 
conspiracy against the life of the 
Japanese Emperor had been discov- 
ered. The police state that a num- 
ber of anarchists have been arrested 
on suspicion of having been engaged 
in the manufacture of bombs. 

It is believed that King Manuel's 
appointment of sixteen new peers, all 
supporters of the present Portuguese 
Cabinet, will afford sufficient new 
strength to the Government to avoid 
the necessity of a dissolution of Par- 
liament and new elections, which the 
Republicans declare would mean rev- 
olution. 

Formal notice of the withdrawal of 
the Venezuelan Legation in Bogota 
has been received by the State De- 
partment, but no reason is assigned 
for the rupture between the countries. 
It is assumed that it is the result of 
the reopening of an old quarrel over 
the rights of navigation in Lake 
Maracaibo and Customs disputes. 

Pope Pius X on September 23 ad- 
dressed a letter to. Cardinal Ros- 
pighi, Vicar-General of Rome, saying 
he wished to express his deep sorrow 
because of the anti-clerical speech de- 
livered by Mayor Nathan at the cele- 
bration on the 20th of the fortieth 
anniversary of the fall of the tem- 
poral power of the Church. 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 




Established 1888. 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

Oldest School on Pacific Coast. Largest 
and best equipped private Nautical School in 
the United States. Graduates prepared for the 
American and British Merchant Marine exam- 
inations. Warrant ofBcers of the United States 
Navy prepared for examination for commis- 
sion officers. Special course for cadets enter- 
ing the United States Naval Academy. 

Personal instruction by Captain Henry Tay- 
lor, M. A., Compass Adjuster, Certified In- 
structor, Passed Master, Proctor in Admiralty, 
Counselor at Law and competent to give legal 
advice on all matters, including Naturalization. 

WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHOLESALE Sole Agents for RETAIL 

The McCormack System of Fine Tailoring 

McCORMACK BROS. 

Importers, Jobbers and Retailers 

MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, CAPS, BOOTS AND SHOES 
TRUNKS, VALISES AND NOTIONS 



812-814 FIRST AVENUE, Opp. Colman Block 



SEATTLE, Wash. 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 

NEVER HAD A FAILURE 
11 COLMAN DOCK SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opp. Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

UNION MADE CLOTHING 

FURNISHINGS, 

HATS AND 

SHOES, at 

Wetterman ft Schermer, 

220 and 222 First Ave. South, 

SEATTLE. WASH 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St., 

Seattle. Wash. 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 
Undertakers 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Jose Alonzo and Chas. Domingo, 
marine firemen, and Antoine Silvia 
and Jose Requeiva, oilers, are re- 
quested to leave addresses with E. A. 
Erickson, 1st Patrolman, care of 
Sailors' Union. 

Any one knowing whereabouts of 
Harry Fields, sometimes called Mar- 
tin Smith, kindly report to F. Ascher, 
1817 Chapin street, Alameda, Cal. 

P. J. Bertlesen, winchman; J. Berg, 
V. Erickson, Olaf Kjellman, L. Linde- 
beck, Theadore Yunther and M. C. 
Rasmussen, seamen; F. H. Sullivan, 
steward; W. Kidd, cook; J. Cote and 
Ed. McNellis, firemen, and G. Lina- 
nans, galleyman, on the steam- 
schooner Washington at the time she 
picked up the Minnie E. Kelton. 
Please call on F. R. Wall, 1209 Mer- 
chants' Exchange. 




SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Candidates for Mas- 
ters' and Mates' Ocean 
or Coast Licenses of 
all Grades are In- 
structed in the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
Navigation in all Its 
Branches, and in the 
Arithmetic of Navi- 
gation in a Clear and Intelligent Manner. 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College- 
Ocean Steamship Master, Unlimited- 
Puget Sound and Alaska Pilot; Author of 
"Self Instructor in Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practice, etc. 

494 ARCADE BUILDING 
Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squlre-Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



My work Is my best advertisement. 

W. H. MIDDLETON 
TAILOR 

A. H. ANDERSON, CUTTER 

Custom Tailors' Union Label In every 

Garment. 

519 THIRD AVENUE 

Three Doors South of James, SEATTLE. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outside of Union Office 

Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle, Weuh., Letter LUt. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mail forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mail until arrival. 



Albrlgtsen, G. J 
Allen, J. 
Anderson, EInor Chr 
Anderson, John -1534 
Anderson, Alf. 
Andersen, Andrew 
Apps, P. 

Armstrong, W. H. 
Bausman, E. -1511 
Benson, F. -1765 
Berg, Edmund -1312 
Berge, Johan 
Berenken, A. 
Bianca, F. -1661 
Botherel, A. 
Bryning, Walter 
Brown, I. 
Carlson, Harold 
Carlson, G. -622 
Christensen, Peter 
Christoftersen, Her 
' lof 
Christensen, Otto 

-1213 
Davidson, Jacob 
Doll, Herman 
Dxeyer, Herman 
Elfstrom, A. 
Erikson, Allan 
Eskola. Henry 
Fernandoez, A. 
Franzell, A. 
Frivald, John 
Fredrickson, B. 
Frose. Ellas 
German, R. B. 
Grandal, Harry 
Gronburg, Theodor 
Gustav, John 
Hansen, John P. 
Haakonsen, H. 
Hass, VVilhelm 
Hansen, Hans Chr. 
Hansen, Andrew 
Harjes, H. -1940 
Haltness, M. 
Hellisen, H. 
Henriksen, Adolf 
Hernonen, H. 
Hillig. Alb. 
Holmes, Paddy 
Holmes, Gus 
Jensen, Hans 
Johansen, C. M.-1593 
Johansen, Olaf K. 
Johnson, Bernard 
Johnson, Chali 
Johnsen, C. J. 
Jorgenson, J. 



1584 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Anders Peter Andersen, a native of 
Denmark (Bogo), aged about 42, is 
inquired for by his sister. Address 
Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart 
street. 

Wilhelm Mahsing, last heard of as 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is inquired 
for by his brother, John Mahsing, 
now sailing out of New Orleans. Ad- 
dress, Marine Firemen's Union, 514 
Dumaine St., New Orleans, La. 



Kalnow, A. 
Keenan, Fred 
Kenny, J. 
Kiesow, P. 
Kronsbrand, H. O. 
Larsen, Claus 
Latz, Konstanz 
Lewis, Geo. H. 
Lindegard, J. 
Lundberg. C. 
Lunder, Bjorn 
Lundgren, C. J. 
Lui, Theo. 
Mattson, E. M. 
Martin, Chr. 
McAdam. J. 
Miller, James 
Mikkelson, M 
Morgan, Ed. 
Moore, J. M. 
Monson, Andrew 
Nielsen, N. A. -909 
Nielsen, Martin 
Nielsen, M. A. 
Nobereit, Gustaf 
Nord, G. E. C. 
Olsen, Oscar, -1062 
Olsen, S. 
Olsen, Gabriel 
Olsen, Valdimar 
Olsen, B. -597 
Olsson, John H. 
Olsen, Hans 
Omundson, Harry . 
Paterson, Robert 
Pedersen, Olaf 
Pederson, A. -1173 
Peterson, A. -1223 
Petterson, C. W. 
Penningrud, Ludon 
Porje, Anton 
Randle, Dave 
Ruzner. Ernest 
Rickardson, Adam 
Rlmmer, J. 
Schmidt, Alfred 
Selander, John 
Shane, J. 
Shallow, J. 
Smith, Max 
Speller, Harry 
Svensson, A. -1691 
Swenson, L. G. 
Tallopon. A. -721 
Williamson, A. 
Zagan, J. 
Zeisler, A. 
Zima, W. 



EUREKA, CAL. 



The Pride D'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO., 
EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparilla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F. 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Prlncesa" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT 


BROS. 


JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 


WATCHES AND 

Cor. of HERON 

ABERDEEN, 


JEWELRY 

& Q STS. 

WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, 
Groceries and Notions. 

We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 
320 S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service. 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO 

(U. 8. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, OUaklns, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closet at 6 p. m.; Saturday* at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 




OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

H. I. MALLEK 



2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Rubber Boots, Oilskins, Flannel Shirts, 
'Em" Overalls, 7Bc; Hickory Shirts, BOc. 



THE RED FRONT 
Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Men's Outfitters, Hats, Caps, Shoes, 
Quilts, Blankets, and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road" and "Can't Bust 
Everything Union made. 

I ■will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 

Remember the place, one block north of Union Hall, 2320 N. 30th St., Old Town- 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, Just 

around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incofporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 
Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. B. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

811-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf, 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing Is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
316 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



C. J. SWANSON 

Clothier and Furnisher for 
Gentlemen 

Up-to-date Suits Made to Order 

Hats, Caps, Shoes, Oilskins and 

Rubberboots 

Bedding, Blankets and Pillows 

Uniform gold braids and gold wreaths 
of all descriptions 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Washington 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phone Douglas 1082 

Home Phone C-S486 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, etc. 
ROSENSTEIN BROS. 
23 N. Third Street, near Burnslde 

Portland, Oregon. 



WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441 
Residence Phone Tabor 3 
I give you a Claim Check for your bag- 
gage at home. Give me your work 
or we both lose money. 
Office: 
23 UNION AVENUE - - Portland, Ore. 



OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 




OFTHE 



OVERALLS 

DEMAND THE BRAND 



Neustadter Bros. 

5AN FRANCISCO NE.W YORK PORTLAND 



UNION MADE CLOTHING 

from our factory to 

your back 

$15.00 Suits For Men 

(Guaranteed in every detail) 

S. N. WOOD & CO. 

Market and Fourth Sts., 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Washington and 11th Sts., 

Oakland, Cal. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE SCANDINAVIAN STORE 

717 Pacific Ave. Near City Hall 

B. OLSON, Proprietor. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

John Ferdinand Petterson Franken, 
a native of Finland, is inquired for. 
Address Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Peter Nielsen, from Aarhus, Den- 
mark, is inquired for by Christ Han- 
sen, 230 W. Thirty-second street, Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Josef Jurek, a native of Rosdzin, 
Germany, is inquired for by the Ger- 
man Consul, 201 Sansome street, San 
Francisco. 

John Tierney, last heard from by 
letter, October, 1906, is inquired for 
by his sister, Mrs. Wm. Degnan, 124 
Harrison street, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Robert Fordyce Bowers, last heard 
of at San Francisco, in March, 1907, 
is requested to communicate with his 
mother Mrs. M. E. Watson, of 12 
Lampton street, Bishopswearmouth, 
Sunderland, England. 

Joseph Flinn, last seen in Los An- 
geles and San Francisco, Cal., is in- 
quired for by his sister, Marie, and 
brother-in-law, John O. Breien, of 
Liverpool, England. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify John 
O. Breien, 4 Conti St., Mobile, Ala. 

Carl Leopold Anderson, native of 
Nordtelje, Sweden, last heard from in 
New Orleans, La., November, 1904, is 
inquired for by his brother John An- 
derson. Address: Sailors' Union, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

John Johnson, a native of Norway, 
born September IS, 1858, at Blegc- 
Icidct Bamle; last heard from in 1904 
living at 230 Third street, San Fran- 
cisco. Any one able to give any in- 
formation kindly communicate with 
his nephew, M. Olsen, Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Wilhelm Pemocller, a ship's car- 
I)cnter, who was discharged from the 
German sailing vessel Nordsee on Feb- 
ruary 14, 1908, and Jobs. Herm. Ditz, 
a machinist, who left the German 
steamship Arabia in September of last 
year, are inquired for by the German 
Consulate at Portland, Oregon. 



The population of Dayton, O., is 
116,577, an increase of 31,244, or 36.6 
per cent, as compared with 85,332 in 
1900. 

The population of Cleveland, Ohio, 
is 560,663, an increase of 178,895 or 
46.9 per cent, as compared with 381,- 
768 in 1900. 

The population of Dallas, Tex., is 
92,104, an increase of 49,466, or 116 
per cent, as compared with 42,638 in 
1900. 

The population of Poughkeepsie, N. 
Y., is 27,936, an increase of 3907, or 
16.3 per cent., as compared with 24,- 
029 in 1900. 

The centennial anniversary of the 
celebration of Mexican independence 
was celebrated in many parts of the 
United States on September 15. 

Extensive smuggling of Asiatics 
into the United States via Tia Juana, 
Mexico, was revealed in the deporta- 
tion on September 24 of ten Chinese, 
three Japanese and one Hindoo, 
caught in an attempt to cross the in- 
ternational boundary line. 

Governor Gillett of California has 
decided to call another special session 
of the State Legislature for October 
1, for the purpose of rectifying an 
error in a bill changing the system of 
taxation, which is to be voted upon 
in November. 

The Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion on September 23 suspended tar- 
iffs filed by the Missouri Pacific, St. 
Louis, Iron Mountain and Southern 
and Texas and Pacific, proposing ad- 
vances in both class and commodity 
rates of the carriers named. 

President Taft has withdrawn from 
entry approximately 70,383 acres of 
land in California and Colorado. The 
California lands, approximating 1327 
acres, are situated along the East 
Walker River. They are believed to 
be valuable for power purposes. 

Baltimore, which was the sixth city 
in the United States in point of pop- 
ulation in 1900, now becomes the 
seventh city, having been outstripped 
by Cleveland. The population of Bal- 
timore is 558,485, an increase of 9.7 
per cent in ten years. 

Important discoveries have been 
made by the aid of X-rays at the 
Phipps Institute, Baltimore. It is be- 
ing demonstrated that it is possible to 
diagnose tuberculosis and to identify 
the disease in its early stages before 
it has developed sufficiently to gen- 
erally demonstrate itself. 

Charles R. Heike, former secretary 
and treasurer of the American Sugar 
Refining Company, was sentenced at 
New York on September 19 to serve 
eight months in the penitentiary and 
pay a fine of $5000 on conviction of 
conspiring to defraud the Government 
by the underweighing of sugar. 

An application for executive clem- 
enry for Captain Peter C. Haines, Jr., 
has been filed with Governor Hughes 
at Albany. Haines was convicted of 
the killing of William K. Annis at the 
Baysidc Yacht Club of Long Island in 
1908, and is serving an indeterminate 
term of from eight to sixteen years in 
Sing Sing. 

A petition to President Taft for the 
pardon of John R. Walsh, the former 
president of the Chicago National 
Rank, was filed on September 24 on 
behalf of Mary L. Walsh, Richard W. 
Walsh and John W. Walsh, respect- 
ively the wife and sons of the prison- 
er. The petition is based upon the 
groinid of the prisoner's precarious 
health. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Returns from the sale of buttons at 
San Francisco on Labor Day in aid 
of a union men's orphanage amounted 
to about $2000. 

The Missouri State Federation of 
Labor on September 21 went on rec- 
ord at Jefferson City as being opposed 
to State-wide prohibition. 

The San Francisco Industrial Con- 
ciliation Board, composed of repre- 
sentatives of employers and employes, 
were permanently organized in that 
city on September 22. 

Victoria, Australia, is arranging to 
send a large contingent of labor mem- 
bers and union representatives to be 
present at the next Eight Hour dem- 
onstration in Sydney. 

The International Miners' Congress 
passed a resolution declaring that, in 
the event of a national strike in one 
country, the neighboring countries 
should limit the output. 

A resolution submitted by the label 
section of the San Francisco Labor 
Council was recently approved, ma- 
king it obligatory upon all unionists 
to demand the union label, button and 
card when purchasing and trading. 

The strike of the building trades of 
Stockton, Cal., which has been going 
on for about three months, was set- 
tled on September 23 by a compro- 
mise. The carpenters, who struck for 
$4.80 per day, will receive $4.40. 

At a meeting at Kansas City on 
September 18, the representatives of 
the coal miners in the Southwestern 
field ratified the agreement made 
with the operators. The contract as 
it now stands is said to be a victory 
for the miners. 

The Socialist candidates for office 
were snowed under at the annual 
election of the Chicago Federation 
of Labor on September 18, thus re- 
versing the impression recently 
created by the fact that the Socialist 
delegates carried a resolution com- 
mitting the Federation to the So- 
cialist policy. 

John Lundrigan of Buffalo has re- 
signed as chairman of the State 
Board of Mediation and Arbitration 
to become General Superintendent of 
the industrial department of the In- 
ternational Paper Company, where 
the thousands of employes of the cor- 
poration can have their differences 
discussed and adjusted. 

The greatest labor war in New 
York City's history has started ow- 
ing to a dispute among the bricklay- 
ers. It will be in full blast the 27th 
inst., when the lockout declared by 
the bosses goes into operation. It 
will directly affect more than 125,000 
artisans, and its influence throughout 
the city will be far reaching. 

The board of management of the 
New South Wales Typographical As- 
sociation has decided to recommend 
the appropriation of £1000 from the 
funds of the union for the purchase of 
shares in Labour Papers Ltd., the 
company promoted by the Australian 
Workers' Union for the purpose of 
publishing a labor daily newspaper. 

It was reported at the eleventh an- 
nual conference of the British Gen- 
eral Federation of Trade-Unions held 
recently in Wales, that at a meeting 
in London, after the formation of the 
federation, 58 delegates were present, 
representing 31,043 members, whilst 
at that conference there were present 
100 delegates, representing a member- 
ship of over 700,000. 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail Is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union. San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Abrahamsen. -1263 
Adamsson, John 
Andersen. -1310 
Andersen, Edvin 
Andersen, 1329 
Andersen, -1526 
Andersen, -1661 
Anderson, -1474 
Anderson, Harold N. 
Anderson, -779 
Anderson, -1344 
Andersson, Aug. 

Baker, C. W. 
Barney, Chas. 
Barwa, David 
Beahan, Ed. 
Beausang, E. 
Beck, John A. 
Behrens, Otto 
Bendixpn, Nic 
Berg, H. J. 
Berg, Edmund 
Berg, Mickel 
Berntsen. Ellert 
Bianco, -1661 
Bietila. -133S 
Bjorklund, Erik 

Carlsen, Jakob 
C'arlsen. Martin 
Carnaghan, W. 
Chaler, B. 
Charlsson, Carl 
Chauche. J. A. 
Chrlstensen, C. D. 
Christensen, E. H. 
Christensen, -1332 

Dahl, Olaf 
Dahlstrom, Herman 
Dahlstrom, -749 
Danlelsen, Sigurd 
Daumgold. Ernest 
Day, Harry E. 
De Baere, H. 

Edwards, Louis 
Ekstrom. Geo. 
Eliasen, -396 
Ellis, Jack 
Elonen, M. H. 
Engebretsen, -125 

Fagerholm. Carl 
Faragher, John 
Faulkner. John E. 
Feeley, Tom 
Fersch, Wm. 
Fischer, Peter 
Fjellman, Jonas 
Foley, J. J. 

Gai-ves, C. 
Gasman, Geo. A. 
German. R. B. 
Gibbs, Harry 
Godorog, Vasale 
Gonzalez, J. 
Gravler, Eugene 
Gronman, -456 
Guerrero, Mrs. 

Haagensen, Martin 
Hageli, Tor^'ald 
Hallgren, John 
Halvorscn, Anton 
Halvorsen, I'sak 
Halverson, -595 
Halvorsen. Sevorin 
Hamann, Fr. 
Hansen, H. O. 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, N. S. 
Hansen, C. O. 
Hansen, Niels 
Hansen, -2085 
Hansen. Adoiph 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, Christ. 
Hansen, Ragnvald 
Hansen, -2060 
Hanson, Chas. G. 



Andersson, John 
Andersson, -1126 
Andersson, -1514 
Andresen, -1635 
Andreasen, Hans 
Appelgren, John 
Armstrong, W. H. 
Arnke. Conrad 
Asplund. Aug. 
Austrand, Ch. 
Aylward, James 

Bjom, Kristian 
Blank, Geo. 
Blecha, Alf. 
Bliesath, Max 
Bolsen, Knud 
Boye, Axel H. 
Brams, C. S. 
Bregler, Fred. 
Brekke, Hans 
Brelin, Adolf 
Broden, Julius 
Brox. Henrik 
Brunwald, H. 
Bryde, C. M. 
Bush, Peter 

Classen, Henry 
Classon, John 
Clausen, Chr. 
Cooley. Howard 
Coughlan, C. 
Coughlan, -1174 
Croschet, D. 
Cutler, Wm. 

De Santls, E. 
Doense, J. 
Doose. W. 
Drausman, Hans 
Dreger, Jack 
Dreler, Paul 
Duff, "Wm. 

Erdman, -1704 
Eriksen, Edw. 
Eriksen, Ole 
Eriksson. C E. 
Ericksson, Chas. 
Evans, E. 

Folkman, John 
Forsman, Frank 
Foyn, Sam 
Fralncso. P. 
Frankovic. A. 
Fransson, Frank 
Frieberg, P. 
Furesson, Theo. 

Guldberg, Randolf 
Gunn, W. D. 
Gundersen, -899 
Gundersen, -785 
Gustafson, Ivar 
Gustman, C. 
Gustafson, G. 
Gustafson, Oscar 



Idog, Chas. 
Illig, Gust 

Jakobsen, J. E. 

Jackobson. Emil 
Jamleson, J. B. 
Jensen, Edward 
,Tensen, M. C. 
Jensen, Geo. L. 
Jensen, N. O. 
Jensen, A. 
Jensen, Olof Nils 
Jensen, R. 
Jensen, -1987 
Jensen. 1461 
Johansen, Axel 
Johansen, Chas. 
Johansen, A. F. 
Johansen, -1705 
Johansen, Mathias 
.Tohansen, -1421 
Johansen, -2004 

Kallas, Aug. 
Karlsen, .John A. 
Karlsson, Josef 
Karlsson, R. 
Karlsson. Gus. Robt 
Karlsson, Gust. 
Kaspersen, O. Chr. 
Kaus, L. 
Kavanagh, Jas. 
Kiel. P. 
Kielman, -885 
Kiesel. A. C. 
Kinerman, Chas. 

Laason, M. 
Lagerberg, P. 
Lahr, Otto 
Larsen, Emil 
Larsen, Laurlls P. 
Larsen, Emil, -1344 
Larsen, Martin 
Larsen, Julius 
Larson, Lars M. 
Latz, Constantine 
Lausman, John 
Lauritsen, Ole 
Laws, J. B. 
Levense, John 
Llndekrantz, F. 
Llndgren, Gustaf 



Hanssen, -1867 
Hansson, Chas. G. 
Hannus, A. 
Harlow. H. A. 
Harmonsen, K. 
Hartkoph, Joseph 
Haug, Hans H. 
Hedinskoy, J. 
Hedvall. A. 
Helin, John 
Helmros, G. 
Helmer, Fred 
Hendriksen, HJ. 
Henriksen. -1734 
Hetman, Walter 
Hevne, Herman 
Hilke, Carl 
Hogelld, Tom 
Holmberg, Olaf 
■ Hunt, Gus 

Isaksen, Gunnar 

Johanesen, Geo. A. 
Johanesen, -1064 
Johansson, 2036 
Johansson, -2076 
Johnsen, Norman 
Johnson, C R. 
Johnson, Jas. K. 
Johnson. Emile 
Johnson, Alf. 
Johnson, -1700 
Johnson, -1547 
Johnson, -1597 
Johndahl, H. 
Johanson, Axel B. 
Johansson, H. A. 
Jorgensen, Johan 
Jorgensen, -lS4fl 
Jorgensen, Wm. 



Kjellgren, L. A. 
Knieling. .Tohn 
Knopf, Louis 
Koch, John 
Kolter, L. 
Konlng, R. 
Koster, Jack 
Kristoffersen. Alf. 
Krlstophersen, Jacob 
Krogstad, H. E. 
Kuhlman, Louis 
Kukuhskin, M. 



Llndroth, Erik 
Lindroth, Gustaf 
Lindskog, Thor. O. 
Lofland, -2121 
Louis. Martin 
Lundberg, Fred 
Lundgren, Hugo 
Lundqvlst, Oscar 
Lundin, -1054 
Lurkman, Ewald 
Lawberg, Albert 
Le Bloa. Sylvaln 
Lehto, Emil 
Lersten, J. O. 
Ludlow, J. J. 
Lynch, -1586 



Malmberg, Elis 
Markus, Bernhard 
Maripu, Johan 
Martin, H. 
Mathisen, Martin 
Matre, Nels J. 
Matthews, F. 
Mattson, John M. 
McLouglin, M. 
McBralney, Hugh 
McMahon, -1887 
Mesak, E. 
Metje, Que. 
Nagel, A. 
Nanberg, Gus 
Nanjack, G. 
Nelsen, -972 
Nelson, Chas. M. 
Nelson, Martin 
Nelson, John 
Nerbrugge, D. 
Newman, J. 
Nick, Peter 
Odeen, Per. 
Odland, B. B. 
Ohis, Johan 
Olstad, Hans 
Olafson, M. 
Olmann, P. 
Olsen, -1112 
Olsen, Ole. Chr. 
Palmroth, J. 
Pearsson, John L. 
Pedersen, Julius 
Pedersen, Laurits 
Pedersen, Aage 
Pedersen, Henning 
Pemberton, Dave 
Petersen, H. C. 
Petersen, -936 
Peterson, FYank V. 
Quigley, R. E. 
Raahange, J. F. 
Ranak, Louis 
Reiner, Karl 
Reinhold, Ernst 
Richardson, A. 
Robinet, Geo. 
Salvesen, Fred 
Samsig, Carl 
Sander, -1068 
Sander, -1068 
Sandstrom, Ivar 
Sandstrom, O. H. 
Saul, Th. A. 
Schevig, A. B. 
Schmalkuche, Fritz 
Scholl, Karl 
Scholtens, Ben 
Schultman, J. H. 
Schultman, Johan 
Schulz, Ernst 
Schelenz, Han« 
Schluter, Paul 
Schmidlen, John 
Schnell, Henry 
Schultz, Albert 
Schwenke, Karl 
Scott, E. G. 
Seagreen, John 
Seberg, C. 
Seiger, Joe 
Sharp, Fred 
Tancer, Chas. 
Teigland, Carl 
Terente, M. 
Tergesen, Tom 
Terwedow, Richard 
Tetter, Anton 
Thorkildsen, J. 
Thompson, Ch. 
Van der Made. L. 
Van der Laan, D, 
Vesta, Tom 
Wahl, Robert 
Wahlberg, Rudolph 
Wakroom, J. 
Wannkvist, E. 
Ward, H. 
Wehde, Fred 
Wenneck, A. 
Werner, Paul 
Zagen, Geo. 
Zazan, J. 



Meyer, Frank 
Meyer, Raymond 
Mikkelsen. Axel 
Miller, J. B. 
Mitchel, Alex 
Monsen. Cornelius 
Moore, J. C. 
Morken, J. L. 
Mullen, Joseph 
Munster, Fred 
Murphy, -1916 
Murray, E. 

Nlcolaysen, Carl 
Nielsen, -1037 
Niit, P. 
Nilsen. -1060 
Nord, G. E. 
Nordling, Sven 
Noidlof, D. H. 
Nordlof, Sigurd 
Nylund, Hans J. 

Olsen, Jens 
Olsen. -235 
Olsen, -754 
Olsen, Marinus 
Olsen, Chas. 
Oterbeck, Hans H. 
Ottenhausen, Carl 
Ouchterlony, Fred 
Peterson, Harry 
Petterson, John B. 
Pierson, Andrew 
Pietschman, Geo. 
Plas, M. J. 
Plaskette, Mike 
Post, Albert 
Prescott, Richard 
Purdy, W. T. -1360 



Roelfs. J. 
Rolf, Henry 
Rosa, -998 
Rosenwald, Isak 
Ross, Wm. 
Runak, Hans 
Sjoberg, Johan 
Skjellerup, A. 
Smith, Henry 
Soderlund, Anton 
Sorensen, -1664 
Sorensen, -1492 
Soto, Santos 
Stangeland, P. E. 
Sterro, J. E. 
Stein. John 
Stewart, J. L. 
Stolzer, Aug. 
Stolt, A. J. 
Strand, Olaf 
Strom, C. 
Sunde Albert 
Sund. Alex 
Suominen, O. 
Svenson, Algot 
Sweeney, John 
Swenson, Edwin 
Swanson, Ims. 
Swanson, Martin 
Swanson, -2184 

Thomassen, Paul 
Toroik, Olaf 
Torbjornsen, O. 
Tramm. Hans 
Trentani, Louis 
Tscheekar, P. 
Tuft. Edw. 

Vucie, V. 
Vuclc, V. 

Wever, Carl 
Whalstedt, Alb. 
Wlad, H. I. 
Wiborg, John 
Wikstrom, Emil 
Wills, Geo. 
Willemson, A. 
Wlllman, -1020 
Zweygberg, John T. 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 



Andersen, -1609 
Andersen, Martin. 

-1661 
Anderson, Victor 
Andreasen, Hans 
Behrentz, C. 
Brandsten, Ernest 



Larson, G. A. 
Lewis, H. 
Plhpick, K. 
Lindsay, Peter 
Lundman, Carl 
Martin, H. 
Martens, Hans 



Christensen, Chris- Matisen, Nils 



ten 

Christansen, N. 
Damlano, Alex. 
Dyeness, L. E. 
Eckert, W. F. 
Forsman, Frank 
Erickson, E. R. 
Hansen, O. R. 
Hansen, -1229 
Hardmere, C. 
Hengst, Otto 
Jensen, -1342 
Jensen. -2014 



Mattler, Franz 
McKinnon, A. B. 
Nielsen, A. -342 
Olsen, G. 
Pedersen, Chas. 
Pedersen. Karl 
Petersen, N. -782 
Peterson. Henning 
Purdy, W. G. 
Rignell, Eric 
Russell, W. 
Schager, E. L. 
Siegurd, J. I. 



Johansen, Niel -2071stensland, Paul 
Johanson, -1677 Strand, -1786 

Johannessen, -1863 Swanson, Martin 



Kaald. John 
Kirst. Hans 
Larsen, Anton 
Liackey, C. 
Larsen, Lars, 



2184 
Thompson. A. 
Torgersen. Kaspar 
Winelad, M 
1290 Zechel, Walter 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 

Antonsen, Fred Lewis, Geo. Henry 

Anderson, John Leesi, A. 

Anderson. P. Risor Mattson. E. -1510 

Belzen, Ivan Mattson, Julius 

Backman, BrtJ6st Ness, Aksel 

Brown, Chas. R. Norman, L/udwig 
Bjomsgaard, KristenOllgreen, Carl 

Carnle. Robert Olson, Anton 

Conwell, James Ponnl, Anton 



Ekblom. Alfred 
G'oodman, Carroll 
Haaversen, Otto 
Handloss, Paul 
Harbeck, Ted 
Jessamine, Alex. 



Purje, Anton 
Steen, Hilmar 
Scott, Wm. 
Schaab. Anton 
Stephan, M. 
Tyler, Wm. B. 



Jacobson, Gus -1092 Winters, Fred 
Kusik, J. Whittol, J. 

Kuutan, Alexander 

Pt. Townsend Letter List. 



Blanca. F. 
Carlsson, -1044 
Carlsen, H. G. 
Harmening. Fritz 
Hillig. Albert 
Kustel, V. J. 



Ollng. G. 
Slmonsen, Sam 
Smldt. A., -938 
Schnell, Heinrich 
Tramm, Hans 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Alfred J. 
Bowers, Gust. 
Collins, E. F. 
Davey, Chas. 
Eishel, Erich, -740 
Fors, Alfred 
Hansen, Chas. 
Haug, Hans H. 
Kimeral, Herman 
Lewis, J. W. 
Lowe, John A. 
Moorten, Louis 
Nelson. Fred 



Nelson, Nels B. 
Ness, John 
Olsen, Chas. 
Petterson, Knut L. 
Pettersen, Johan 
Reay, L. A. 
Reuter, Ernest 
Robsham, Jens W. 
Lolberg, B. P. 
Thore, B. E. 
Ullman, Gustaf 
Vongehr, Edward 
Zelig, Gustav 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Harry Hayes, last heard from in 
Tacoma, Wash., in 1895, or anyone 
having information concerning him is 
requested to furnish same to H. W. 
Hutton, 527-529 Pacific Bldg., San 
Francisco. 



Andreasen, O. L. 
Aken, Emil 
Askcr, John 
Andersen. Oluf 
Andersen, J. -934 
Andersen, Sam 
Adman, O. 
Buth, Siegfried 
Brander, Wm. 
Boy, George 
Brandt, Nils 
Bensen, John 
Collins, F. ■ 
Cooley, Howard 
Castei, J. 
Calson, Carl 
Comstock, Howard 
Cuttler, Wm. 
Davis, John 
Dirks, George 
De Cantes, M. 
Fisko, Oluf 
Faccet, Sam 
Gras, Charles 
Graves, Sam 
Granberg, Gus S. 
Ilubner. H. 
Hall. Leonard 
liolmstrom. C. A. 
Holm, Carl 
Hartman, Geo. 
Hansen, Ole 
Hanson, Henry 
Houser, Charlie 
Johnson, Andrew 
Jacobsen, G. -1092 
Isacson, Ch., -140 
Johanson, Hjalmar 
Jarf, Krlstian 
Jorgensen, Charles 
Johnson, C. -1345 
Jensen, Ingvalt, M. 
.Johannessen, Josef 
Jolianson, Fr. -2019 
Johanson, Teodor 
Johnson, R. W. 
Johnson, Carl, -1585 
Johnson, Julius 
Johansen, Herluf C. 
Jonasson Carl Axel 
Johnson, Frank 
Kose, Armin 
Karlson, Edvard 
Krumbiegel, Arthur 
Kuhme, Wm. 
Kimeral, Herman 
Kielman. Joe 
KofCer. Mark 
Klolen, Karl 
Lundberg. C. 
Lindblom, Ernst 
Larsen, George 



Lindholm, Chas. 
Lingberg, Oscar 
Larson, M. A. 
Lohtonen, John 
Lengwems, U. L. 
Lorentzen, Ernest 
I..inquist, Gust 
Lorin, Martin 
Lind, Gust 
Miller, Otto 
Mattson, Karl 
Mattson, J. 
Neilson, A. O. 
Nurmi, Victor 
Nilson, Alfred 
Olsen, Ernest 
Olsen, E. A. 
Olsen, Carl 
Olsson, Carl G. -1101 
Olsen, Oswald, -1059 
Oscar, Carl 
Orten, Sigurd 
Olson, Wilhelm 
Olsen, John 
Olsen, Valler 
Olsen, Olaf O. 
Pedersen, Kristian 
Petersen, Oscar 
Poison, C. -641 
Pearson, Julius F. 
Pettersen, Wilhelm 
Pedersen, Hans Chr. 
Petersen, Oscar Fr. 
Petersen, A. G. -2404 
Prondberg, G. -1306 
Peratls, John 
Roswell, Gus. 
Rost, K. G. 
Rasmussen, N. G., 

-485 
Swanson, Martin 
Skoman, Chas. 
Sverstrup, E. F. 
Sparre, Don 
Schulter, Paul 
Schelenz, Karl 
Steversen. Charles 
Stevens, Scott R. 
Sorensen. Karl 
Svenson, Bernard 
Siegurd, Jushus T. 
Smith, J. V. 
Speckman, Max 
Thompson, Chas. 
Thorsen, Jens 
Uolby, Harold 
Wishaar, E. B. 
Westnas, Ivar 
WUorio, J. 
Veaal, G. 
Winters, C. 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List. 



Andersen, John 
Anderson, Olof 
Anderson, S. 
Armmi, Walter 
Blunt, H. 
Bostrom, C. 
Brown, C. L. 
Bryan, G. F. 
Christensen, Harvy 
Conaughton, H. 
Ekwall, G. A. 
Fors, Alfred 
Fraberg, Enock 
Goevyette, Joseph 
Grant, John 
Gunther, Theo. 
Gustafson, Edvard 
Horlin, Ernest 
Hollins, Frank 
Isaacson, Gustav 
Ivars, Carl 
Johanesen, Arthur 
Johnsen, J., -25 
Johnston, R. 
Karlson, Anders E. 
Klauson, Axel. 
Lombar, Ermino 
Lorensen. Org. C 
Michaelsen, Johanes 



Mlcheli Agojtino 
Niccolal, Sant 
Nilsen, R. 
Nilsen, O. 
Nordblom, Ben. 
Nylund, Sven 
Olsen, Peder A. 
Olson, Bror. 
Olson, C. 
Oman, Victor 
Palomo, G. 
Pedersen, Martin 
Pedersen, Paul 
Pedersen, Peter 
Petterson, Aaskar 
Penney, Math. 
Salminen, K. W. 
Selander, Gustaf 
Shulls, Christ. 
Sjellman, Jonas 
Stienen, J. C. 
Svendsen, Olof 
Teigland, G. 
Thoresen, Petter 
Kaikman, Otto 
Walbreth, Carl 
Wilsonn, John 
Yannie, C. 
Yulmky, Wm. 



WHITE PALACE GOOD- 
YEAR SHOE RE- 
PAIRING CO. 

JOE WEISS, Prop. 

56 East St., bet. Market and 

Mission, San Francisco 

Always in stock full lines 
of Union-Made and Govern- 
ment shoes, new and second- 
hand. 

Your old shoes made new. We use 
the best leather in the market. 

Half Soles, sewed 75 cts. 

Half Soles, sewed, and Heels $1.00 

Rubber Heels SO cts. 

All Work Guaranteed! 




COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY -AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savincs (THE GERMAN BANK; Commercial 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks 
r of San Francisco.) 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital .... $ 1,200,000.00 
Capital actually paid up in cash $ 1,000,000.00 
Reserve and Contingent Funds . .1 1,5.5.5,09,3.0.5 

Deposits June 30th, 1910 1S'?^H^V5\ 

Total Assets 43,108,907.8-' 

■ Remittance may be made by draft, post office, or Wtlls 
Fargo & Go's money orders, or coin by express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 o'clock P. M., except 
Siturdiys to 12 o'clock M. and Saturday Evenings from 
6.3) o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of deposits 

OFFICERS— President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-Pres- 
ident, Daniel Meyer; Second Vce-President and M inaser, 
George Toumv; Third Vice-President, J. W. Van Bergen; 
Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier. Wiluiin 
Herrmann; Secretarv, A. H. Muller; Assistant S,;crct:ir:es, 
G. J. 0. Folte and \Vm. D. Newhouse; Good.eliow & 
Eells, G-nerrd Attornnys. ,„.,,, 

BOARD OF DlREyrOnS— N. Ohlandt, D.iniel M-y"r, 
George Tournv, J. W. Van Bergen, Ign. Steinhart, ]. N. 
Walter, F. Tiilmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and W. S. G"",l- 
fellow. 

MISSION BR(VNCH, 2572 Mission Street, between 21st 
and 22nd Sts. For receipt and payment of Deposits only. 
C. W. Hever. Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH. 432 Clement Street, 
betwe»n 5th and 6th Avenues. For receipt and payment 
of deposits only. W. C. Heycr, Manager. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 Folsom street, near Third street 

Over 100, all sunny rooms to let; fur- 
nished up-to-date; electric lights; run- 
ning hot and cold water; baths free. 
Rates, $1.75 to $3.00 per week; 25c to 
75c per day. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Booms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
|2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water In 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL, LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, oppo- 
site Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. 
Baths, Reading Room. Offlce open all 
night. Best place near waterfront. 
Investigate. 



FERRY HOUSE 

CORNER EAST AND MISSION STS. 
Opposite Ferry Building 
EARTHQUAKE AND FIREPROOF 
The only house in the block between 
Market and Mission streets which was not 
Injured by the great catastrophe of 1906. 
Nice Sunny Furnished Rooms from 25c 
to $2 per day; $1.50 to $6 per week; rooms 
for two persons $2.50 per week. 



Blue Diamond Havana Cigars are 
satisfactory because they are hand- 
made from imported Havana by com- 
petent union cigar makers — 2 for 25c 
'— 10c, 3 (or 25c. 

THRANE BROS., Makers. 
46 East St., Under Union Headquar- 
ters and 1800 Market St. 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
109 STEUAR TST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



THE EAGLE CIGAR STORE 

and Laundry Office 

HENRY BORNEMAN, Proprietor 

Give me a call for old time's sake 

229 EAST STREET 

Between Washington and Jackson Sts. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
8llk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Below 5th, near U. S. Mint and Emporium 

Phones: Kearny 1966; Home J -1966 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Nils Edmund Johansen, a native of 
Tansberg, Norway, aged about 50, last 
heard of at Melbourne, Australia, is 
inquired for by his brother. Address 
Martin Johansen, 839 Centennial ave- 
nue, Alameda, Cal. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 



OF CALIFORNIA 



MARKET AND 8ANSOME STREETS 

Branches: 624 Van Nets Avenu* and 3039 Sixteenth Street 

Authorized Capital, »3,000,000. CapltaJ Paid In, $1,500,000. 

Accounts of Individuals, Arms, corporations and societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts at the rate of 4% per annum. 
Drafts and Letter? of Credit issued, payable in all parts of the world. 
Cha«. F. Leege, Free. W. A. Frederick, Vlce-Pres. B. G. TognazzI, Manager. 

Chas. C. Moore, Vice-Pres. 

QavIn McNab, Vlce-Pres. 



Domestic and Naval. 



SOMETHING NE'W 

The Antidote Pipe 

A POSITIVE 

NICOTINE 
DESTROYER. 

"ANTIDOTE," 
the Catalytic Pipe, 
has Four Impor- 
tant Advantages 
which can be found 
in No Other Pipe. 

1. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" needs No 
Breaking In. Ev- 
ery smoker knows 
the terrors of the 
first few smokes In 
an ordinary Pipe. 
The First Smoke in 
an "ANTIDOTE" 
is as sweet as 
an ordinary Pipe 
sweetened by Long 
Usage. 

2. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" can not 
burn out. The 
Catalytic lining 
protects the briar. 

3. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" is always 
Dry even with con- 
stant smoking. 

4. The "ANTIDOTE" scientifically destroys the Nicotine, making it 
evaporate. A porous lining filled with Coal Tar Particles (Platinum, etc.) is 
placed in the bowl of a briar pipe, this is called the Catalyser; the smoke 
passing over the Catalyser produces Formol. This Formol turns all the 
moisture and Nicotine into steam, causing it to pass off into the air and 
evaporate. 

All "ANTIDOTE" Pipes are hand made, of the Best French Briar. 

KASSBR BROS. 

Distributors 

19 MARKET STREET, S. E. Cor. Steuart, San Francisco, Cal. 

Pipe Repairing Our Specialty. 




SMOKERS 



See that this label (in light 
blue) appears on the box in 
which you are served. 



^^^^^g^?g5^SEPH880^^>^ 

Issued by AuUlority of tne Ccgax MdKers' Imetnalional Union of America. 

Union-made Cigars. 

*l\l\$ (Enlif i(^. Tint the C1;in coitiined itithls bos ban ban mxia bya FllSt-CbSS VfenML 
1 MUKROr the: CICAR UMERS 'mTUIUTIOKAl union nl Amnio, in oijinizitiai devoted b the 3d' 
vdnce»uitoftlieMORAl,WATDlWjndlMai£aUAIW[UAR£OfIHfCRAfr. '" ' 



Therefore we reconaen) 



All IfltringtiiMiiu upofl thisLdbclMirbe puMsfaed tccadinq to (awf- 



^s*j?cXi!gs>;?i^»x,.^«tfj4si*i;.>4Sa!Ws^»^ 



9 purusoed iccaainqviim 
V CiflUci 



>f America 



Label Shirts 
Label Collars 

Bell Brand Union-Made 
COLLARS in popular 
shapes at two for 25c. 
S H I R TS made right 
here in San Francisco 
by Union Labor. You 
can patronize home 
industry and Union La- 
bor. Good assortment of 
shirts at $L0O and $1.50. 

Johnston's 

Men's Furnishing Goods 

916 MARKET STREET 

Directly Opposite Sth 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

BED SEAL CIGAB CO., linNUrACTUBEBS 

153 HARTFORD ST., S. F. 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 4 Stores: 

72 MARKET STREET 

1158 MARKET STREET 

605 KEARNY STREET 

2640 MISSION STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Ellis Owen Pritchard, last heard 
from on the Pacific Coast four years 
ago, is inquired for by his sister. Any- 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
communicate with the Coast Searr^n's 
Journal. 



The Cunard liner Mauretania, on a 
recent westward passage, reduced the 
record by 10 minutes, or 4 days, 10 
hours and 41 minutes. 

During target practice off the Vir- 
ginia Capes on September 22, one of 
the twelve-inch, eighty-ton guns of 
the battleship Georgia burst on the 
first range shot. The crew escaped 
injury. 

Over 4,000,000,000 whitefish, perch 
and trout will be released into the 
waters of the Great Lakes from the 
Government hatcheries. The salmon 
hatch at the west coast of the United 
States also will be increased next 
spring. 

According to a dispatch from Brus- 
sels, the British steamer Albertville, 
from the Congo for Antwerp, has 
been wrecked on the rocks at the 
mouth of the Congo River. The ves- 
sel and cargo were lost, but a!l on 
board escaped. 

The steamship France, built for the 
Compagnie Generale Transatlantique 
(French Line) for its New York and 
Havre service, was launched at St. 
Nazaire, France, on September 20. 
The France is the largest ship in the 
French merchant marine. 

Captain Klaus Larsen on Septem- 
ber 18 demonstrated that a motor- 
boat can safely pass through the Nia- 
gara Rapids and the whirlpool, but 
his launch, the Ferro, came to grief 
between the whirlpool and Lewiston, 
and the daring navigator was rescued 
with but minor injuries. 

The Hamburg-American Line has 
instituted a special porter service for 
ocean travelers. The porters may be 
summoned by telephone, telegraph or 
letter to the company's office, and will 
meet trains or boats at any station 
in or about New York and at any 
hour of the day or night. 

The British steamship Arvonian, 
which arrived in Baltimore recently 
lost a stoker on her passage from 
Pernambuco, in addition to the three 
propellor blades previously reported. 
Griffith Hughes, fireman and trimmer, 
died as the result of being struck by 
a falling ash bucket on September 5. 

The award of the International 
Court of Arbitration in the New- 
foundland fisheries case became irrev- 
ocable on September 13 with the ex- 
piration of the five days allowed for 
an appeal without either the United 
States or Great Britain having en- ! 
tered a protest against the findings. 

Bobby Leach of Niagara Falls, 
Ont., on September 24 made a trip 
through the Whirlpool Rapids in a 
barrel, starting from the old Maid of 
the Mist landing cantilever bridge. 
Fxcept for a few scratches and 
bruises, Leach, who claims to have 
made the trip several times before, 
was unluirt. 

Orders from Washington have 
reached Port Townsend, Wash., to 
sell at auction the quarantine ship 
lonie. Much sentiment attaches to 
the matter, because the lonie was 
formerly the warship Iroquois, which 
belonged to Farragut's fleet which 
forced its way up the Mississippi to 
New Orleans in 1862. 

Rear-Admiral Francis W. Dickins, 
who, during the Spanish-.American 
War, had much to do with planning 
the successful naval campaigns, died 
in New York on September 15. Ad- 
miral Dickins was born in Beckman- 
ville, N. Y., November 2, 1844, and 
entered the naval service as acting 
midshipman September 20, 1861. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



How They Do It. — In a hotel in 
Montana is the following notice: 

Boarders are taken by the day, 
week or month. Those who do not 
pay promptly are taken by the neck. 
— Lippincott's. 



Just Dropped In. — Tattered Terry 
(as he hears farmer approaching the 
barn) — Get up, Bill; kick a hole in 
the roof, roll over on the hay a couple 
of times, and we'll tell the old geezer 
we're aviators. — Puck. 



A Safe Conclusion. — "There is 
neither marriage nor giving in mar- 
riage in heaven." 

"That being the case, I suppose we 
may safely conclude that there is no 
Reno in heaven." — Chicago Record- 
Herald. 



The Mood of a Fan. — "Why do you 
watch the baseball bulletins so care- 
fully?" asked one woman. 

"My husband is an enthusiast over 
the game," replied the other. "I make 
it a rule never to discuss household 
or millinery expenses with him except 
on days u-hen the home team wins." — 
Washington Star. 



Could Remember One. — Professor 
McGoozle — It is astonishing how 
little the young people of the present 
day know of mathematics. For ex- 
ample. Miss Tartun — or you, Mr. 
Sparks — do you remember what the 
rule of three is? 

Miss Tartun — Oh, yes, professor; I 
haven't forgotten that I think. "Three 
is a crowd." That right? — Chicago 
Tribune. 



Personal Resentment. — "What 
makes Mrs. Flimgilt so determined 
to become a voter?" 

"She says it's time to put a stop 
to the shameful abuses of authority 
now in evidence." 

"But she used to be indifferent to 
such matters." 

"Yes. But she's thoroughly aroused. 
You see, a policeman came around 
and told her she would have to put a 
muzzle on her dog." — Washington 
Star. 



Secure and Profitable 

The wise man keeps part of his 
money In a reliable savings bank. . If 
you are making money now, why not 
put aside something for a rainy day. 
Savings and Commercial Departments 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 



783 MARKET STREET, near Fourth 
San Francisco 



Bagley's Navy 
Plug 

A niME CHEW 
Give It a Trial 



lUTtRiimDioa. I UIVIOIN 
' umoii. 
To 




THE MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK 

Chronicle Building. 
Successor to 

THE SCANDINAVIAN SAVINGS BANK 

Offers to depositors the advantage of an INCOME from money de- 
posited and the PROTECTION afforded by a NATIONAL BANK. 
Interest Paid on Term Deposits. 
Depositary for the United States. 

State of California 
City and County of San Francisco 




Established 1886 



United States 
Watch Club 

E. r. COLLINS, Ma>kag*r 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 



FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Rooms 9 & 10 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

W. L. Douglas Shoes 

AGENTS FOR 

STOCKTON VICUNA FLANNELS. BEST MADE. 

UP-TO-DATE STYLES IN SUITS AT REASONABLE PRICES 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

FAIR PRICES. RELIABLE GOODS. 

50 EAST ST., and 4 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING. 




KENT U. S. COVERNMENI CHtlTS MD NAimCU nillUTIOIB 
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12 MAR.KET STREET 

(gri ol Sicrimioto ut Mirkit Sti.. SAN FDAIICISCO. ML. 



QEALCR IN 



Watches, Chronometers, Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods, Diamonds 



MARINE C&. FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined fcy Tranait Obaeivation 
CHRONOMrTKna and Skxtants Rkntkd 



J. COHEN a CO. 
Baltimore Olothing Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 

HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS. 

California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters. Boss of the Road 

Overalls, 75 cents. Union Label Lace Back, 85 cents. 

Union Label Hickory Shirts, SO cents. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 

AGENTS FOR CLOVERLEAF RED SOLE BOOTS — GUARANTEED. 




Eyes Examined Free 



£^ 



Repairing Our Specialty 



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^99 and Oredi. 



JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 
715 MARKET STREET - - - Near Call BIdg. 
2593 MISSION STREET - - - Near 22nd St. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

The Largest Jewelry Store, with the Largest Stock at 
the Lowest Prices 

ALL WATCH REPAIRING WARRANTED FOR TWO 
YEARS 



UNITED STATES NAUTICAL COLLEGE 

CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD, F. R. G. S., Principal 

This Modem Navigation School has no superior In the world to-day. 
As a practical navigator the Principal can claim without ostentation to rank 
second to none, and has the right experience and ability to teach you up-to-date 
methods in a systematic and easy manner. You can find one or more of our pupIlB 
on most any vessel sailing out of this port. ASK THEM. 

Advice on Maritime Law, Ship's Business and Naturalization FREE. 
Evenings By Appointment. 

SPECIAL COURSE IN WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY. 
SflO MARKET ST., S. F. Visitors Welcome. Telephone Kearny 4«M 




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H'orth $1.00, but sold for Jjf. 

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AND KEEPERS OF YOUR 
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Small change or big change 
placed in one of these has a strong 
durable depositary — hard to break. 
Better still, there is no continual 
temptation to open the bank, be- 
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Bring the bank here when you 
want it opened. Do what you like 
with the money. 




Charles Lyons 



London 
Tailor 



719 Market St., Near 3rd 

Branch Store 

1432 Fillmore St. 



C. BREINING 

Representing Marine District 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Bet. King and Berry 8ts., San Francisco 

GENTS', BOYS', AND 
YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, etc., Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and OH Clothing. Seamen's Out- 
fits a specialty. 

If you want first-class goods at the 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake — Look for the Name 
and Number, 




Headquarters for Dependable Shoes 

We are agents for the W. I... Douglas, 
Just "Wright" and Stacey Adam union- 
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PRICE'S 

68 THIRD STREET 
Below Call UUa. ••" rrancltc* 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 





A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 




VOL. XXIV. No. 3. 


SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 5, 1910. 


Whole No. 2089. 



CONDITIONS THAT CONCERN LABOR. 



SCATTERED throughout this country of 
ours, North, South, East and West, are 
storehouses crammed with life's necessities, 
for which the people are clamoring, but the ring 
that has control has received endorsement that 
their methods are legitimate and sanctioned by 
our lawmakers. These individuals are using this 
means and this power to create artificial short- 
ages and through the use of this guise unreason- 
able extortion is operating. What do you call 
this, my brothers? Were the question put to me 
to answer, I would thunder out, restraint of trade 
of the most damnable order. The responsibility 
of the situation is a trend of selfishness that has 
been assuming added proportions for years back 
and has developed to the extent, at this time, of 
representing a real menace to the life of the re- 
public. Legitimate profits arc no longer ac- 
ceptable. There was a time when the accumula- 
tion of one generation was flitted away by the 
succeeding generation, and this condition was 
looked on as one of the truisms, but we have 
progressed from that age and reversed the situa- 
tion to the efifect that if the fortunes handed 
down to-day are put in contest of the character 
described, the second generation find themselves 
unequal to the task, and while they go to the 
devil the fortunes hold intact. The menace to 
our Government is represented in the use these 
accumulating fortunes are put to. There is pos- 
sibly no danger while the originators live, but 
the danger comes when the vast accumulations 
fall into the possession of the descendants, with 
the possibilities of some of these descendants be- 
ing degenerates, who, through some whim or 
fancy, may use this power as a means of redress 
to the general detriment of the Government it- 
self. We can discern signs of this character at 
present in the control, industrially as well as 
politically, where a selected few dominate in dic- 
tating prices and policies of government. We, 
some of us, look with apprehension at the judicial 
department and feel that the elevation to this 
honorable position is not, at all times, an 
appointment of merit, but rather a recogniti(jn 
for services either rendered or bartered. Law 
must be indiscriminate in its operation to give 
satisfaction, and when judges impose penalties of 
a year in jail or nine months or six months, 
against representative labor leaders, men who 
have devoted their lives to the mission of per- 
fecting social conditions, that the lot of their 
fellows might be bettered, their only ofifense be- 
ing to advise the withdrawal of patronage from 
the product manufactured under the so-styled 
unfair conditions. Let us contrast for a moment 
the two conditions of restraint of trade referred 
to, the one dealing with direct necessities, beef, 
pork, wheat, eggs and a list that includes about 
everything we eat and wear, even the box that 
we are laid away in at the end of our earthly 
career, all indispensable, direct necessities of life. 
We arc asked to believe that a class that has 
not produced nor do they consume but little of 
the things mentioned, that they have the right 
through their accumulated capital to gather in 
this harvest from God's broad fields and store 
them away until the consuming class is forced 
to pay the tribute that goes to satisfy the ex- 
tortionist. This is considered legitimate, while on 
the other hand we have another commodity that 
is not a direct necessity, something that we could 



get along without, but if anything is said about 
the manner of producing this not wholly neces- 
sary thing and what is said interferes with its sale 
on the market, then you go to jail, while the 
other fellow, who restrains God's provision, pro- 
duced by him for the maintenance of his family, 
is sitting smilingly by, wondering how long the 
people will be fooled. 

One other point is contained in the fining of 
the United Hatters' Union for violation of the 
Sherman Anti-Trust Law. This hill in the agi- 
tational stage, leading up to its passage as a law, 
was claimed as a needed protection to the inter- 
ests of the wage earners and farmer class of our 
country and a regulator of restraint of trade as 
l)racticed by unscrupulous corporations. We are 
furnished in this interpretation of the law as 
handed down in the Hatters' case that the Sher- 
man Act, as defined by our life-term judges, 
represents the direct opposite from what was 
claimed for it by those responsible for its enact- 
ment. That is, the labor and farmer class have 
become victims of the law and the big trusts and 
combines are permitted to go on doing business 
at the same old place in the same old way, un- 
molested. If at times, through exposure of 
methods of the bad trusts, so-styled, action is 
started against them, they are brought into court, 
adjudged guilty, fined $29,000,000 and the matter 
immediately becomes an internatigjial joke. The 
plaintiff appeals, the second trial of the case re- 
verses the former decision and the case is thrown 
out of court and the benefit the people derive is 
contained in the amusement they get out of the 
farce. This would represent considerable to us 
if it were not for the fact of the cost attached. 
We have been patiently watching and waiting for 
some disagreement among the different benches 
of judges on the Gompers, Mitchell and Morri- 
son case, also the Hatters' case, but we find that 
the decision of the judge who first prescribed the 
sentence is upheld by his associates and that 
there is but one interpretation of law pertaining 
to labor cases and that holds good with all. We 
may be dense, we appreciate that we have been 
developed largely on the muscuhir line, but we 
think we can understand, in our comparison, that 
the law is exercising against the lesser of the 
two evils, if they are botli listed to tliat efifect. 
It is hinted by some whom 1 have listened to, 
that the reason of the discrimination shown in 
favor of the capitalistic combinations is, that they 
are able to return favors for protection and priv- 
ileges granted. 

The boycott is regarded as a mighty serious 
proposition by many, but it is a princii)le that is 
engrafted into the very life of this republic. P.ack 
in the time preceding the Revolution it was con 
sidercd commendable to go to the extreme of 
unloading into Boston harbor the tea covered by 
the tax of that old despot King George III. Yes, 
our forefathers were extreme boycotters, and it 
was their determination to have a square deal 
that produced this country and the principles on 
which it is founded, but the despots still live, and 
at this time, in this country of ours, they are 
collecting their tribute in proportions that would 
make old King George III, were he alive to-day, 
green with envy. The pressing need of the 
times is some of that old colonial spirit, and to 
use it to the effect of doing with the extortion- 
ists of this age what they, the forefathers, did 



with old King George liack in the time of the 
Revolution. 

Brothers, a democracy represents in its truest 
sense a government of the people. This good 
country of ours has furnished a splendid example 
for the other nations of the earth, but of late 
years it has been getting too far away from th:- 
people, and many of our thinkers reason that at 
this time the control rests in the hands of a very 
small number of individuals. Our government is 
losing its representative sense. It is a rare mat- 
ter to find in our State legislative bodies a repre- 
sentative of the great working class, and while 
they are unrepresented we know that from their 
earnings come the revenues necessary to the 
maintenance of our government, and beyond this 
it is the votes coming from the labor wing that 
bestow the political honors. Our national legis- 
lature is just as unrepresentative. This is not so 
in England, France or Germany. In the govern- 
ment legislature of each of these countries the 
working class is represented, with the result that 
the workers' interests are cared for and legisla- 
tion from which our country is copying is en- 
grafted into law and operating to the advantage 
of the toilers of these older countries. This con- 
dition leads to the thought that assuming that 
the present day politician is disposed to force 
the responsibility of labor legislation on the 
labor wing of society and I feel that this position 
is reasonable, on the grounds that we have in too 
many instances exhibited a willingness to return 
to office even those who have shown contempt for 
labor legislation and a prejudice deep against the 
labor wing in general. Is it not an endorsement 
of the other fellow's acts that they arc right and 
that we are wrong when the laborer votes to re- 
turn to the position of power the labor antag- 
onist? Until such times as we show a respect 
for ourselves, and the interests that concern us, 
we should look for little respect from the other 
side. 

Too long has labor occupied the servile posi- 
tion on matters political; his accomplishments on 
industrial lines justify a high degree of dignity 
and he should not forget the fact that, responsible 
to his organized effort, all the progress, all of the 
benefit that has been conferred upon humanity in 
the ages past and present can be credited only to 
the labor movement. This work has furnished an 
opportunity to the toiler to study and observe the 
effect of organization, and through this we learn 
that in the interest of civilization the elevation of 
the toilers from the basis of mere slaves to be 
free and liberty-loving citizens has been the work 
of the union. It has represented a grand work, 
this promoting the progress of humanity. What 
next is to be done? Evidently the workingman 
must teach himself, must solve his own problem 
and the lesson is being forced upon them that 
their freedom and liberty is being encroached 
upon. That is as it should be. It is well. If you 
desire a principle to grow, you need to perse- 
cute it. The toiler needs just a little more of the 
Gompers, Mitchell and Morrison persecution, a 
mite more of the kind bestowed on the hatters, 
to force to his attention the fact of the curtail- 
ment of his liberty. In the words of President 
Gompers, go on applying the penalties, but if 
there is any among that peculiar type of citizens 

(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COOLIE LABOR IN TRINIDAD. 



At a recent meeting of the Agricultural 
Society of Trinidad and Tobago, at which 
the Governor presided, Dr. George H. Mas- 
son, a former health port officer, read a pa- 
per treating of the health conditions of in- 
dentured laborers, from which the following 
statistics are given. The figures covered 
the year 1907-8, but the Governor admitted 
that 1908-9 would make even a worse show- 
ing. 

There are approximately in Trinidad 10,- 
000 indentured immigrants emi)loyed on the 
various cane, cacao, cocoanut. and other 
plantations, and among this population there 
were 28,592 cases of disease under treat- 
ment during the year, or an average of near- 
ly 3 cases for every laborer, and the aver- 
age duration of the sickness was 9 days, thus 
showing the number of days" labor lost by 
sickness was 257,328. 

"The average cost of maintaining a la- 
borer in the hospital is about 15 cents a day, 
hence the cost of maintaining the sick while 
in the hospitals during the year was over 
$38,000. 

":\ healthy immigrant, employed 5 days 
in the week, should accomplish 260 days' 
labor during the year, hence the loss by 
sickness means practically the labor of 
1,000 persons, or one-tenth of the possible 
amount of profitable labor if perfect health 
conditions prevailed among the laborers all 
the time. The profit to the estate is esti- 
mated at 5 cents on each day's labor, which, 
added to the cost of the hospital mainte- 
nance, amounts to an annual loss to the es- 
tates of over $50,000. 

"The estate hospitals show by their rec- 
ords the following principal diseases and 
their number treated : Dysentery, 930 ; ma- 
laria, 10,248; anaemia, 1,499; ankylostomia- 
sis, 121 ; digestive system, 2,121 ; ground 
itch, 456; parasites, 1,258; skin diseases, 
4,527; local injuries, 259; respiratory sys- 
tem, 7.58; rheumatism, 758; total principal 
diseases treated, 22,935. 

"Excluding the last three on this list, all 
the rest are diseases in respect to which the 
causes and means of eradication are well 
understood by medical science. "1 am. fully 
persuaded that the enormous sick rate 
among the indentured immigrants is an un- 
necessary and to a very large extent pre- 
ventable burden." 

The lecturer cited instances of experience 
with somewhat similar disease conditions 
in other countries and mentioned the "Canal 
Zone, now one of the healthiest localities 
in the world, as a marvelous circumstance 
and illustration, proving the potentialities of 
preventive medicine and treatment." 

Indentured labor, as found in Trinidad, 
is known as the Indian system, the first load 
of coolies arriving from Calcutta on May 
30, 1845. The owners or managers of the 
various estates each year notify the Gov- 
ernment of the number of immigrants for 
which they desire provision made for the 
following \'ear. The Government agents 
in India are notified of the number to be 
obtained for the next shipment, who, dur- 
ing the following months, are picked up in 
various sections of the country and forward- 
ed to Calcutta for careful examination before 
the appointed time for sailing. They are 
made fully aware of all the conditions of 
the contract of indenture before being ship- 
ped, as to wages, treatment, time limita- 
tions, etc. The Government contracts with 



the steamship company for the transporta- 
tion, and their reasonable care and treat- 
mtnt while on the passage is properly pro- 
vided for. 

Upon arrival here they are taken in charge 
by the protector of immigrants, who allots 
them to the various estates according to pre- 
vious applications, and in the exercise of his 
,best judgment. The ordinances provide that 
husband and wife and small children shall 
not be separated, and al.so, as far as pos- 
sible, that relatives and former local asso- 
ciates shall be kept on the same estate or 
near together. 

The contract provides that they shall be 
comfortably housed in barracks, properly 
constructed, considering the welfare of the. 
laborers and their consequent worth to 
their employers. These houses and their 
upkeep are always to be furnished by the 
estates for the first year after arrival. The 
wages agreed upon, when wages are being 
earned, is, under ordinary circumstances : 
For an adult able-bodied man or woman, 25 
cents a day as the minimum, and this is 
the general wage, except with child labor, 
or when the protector agrees to some other 
rate. Hospitals also have to be maintained, 
suitable for all the possible needs which 
may arise in case of ordinary sickness and 
treatment, at the expense of the estate. 

The transportation expense is provided 
for from the so-called immigration fund, 
which is produced from an export duty on 
cocoa, cocoanuts, and other products. The 
riovcrnment is obliged to provide schools for 
the children of these immigrants, and it is 
said by those who labor among them that 
the children are ver}' susceptible to instruc- 
tion, show a deep interest, and enjoy their 
work. 'J'he immigrants are allowed to 
maintain and ])ractice their customary re- 
ligious beliefs, marriage and funeral cere- 
monies, certain public records being kept as 
of the rest of the population. 

During the past few years the number 
brought in annually has l^een from 2,000 to 
3.000, and they are indentured for a 5-year 
period of service, after which they are ab- 
solutely free, unless they wish to enter into 
a further term of indenture. The most of 
them, after the 5 years expire, become citi- 
zens in fact, buying land themselves, and 
establishing homes. They are industrious 
and very saving, as well as peaceable and 
law-abiding. If they remain in the colony 
for 10 years, they are entitled to their trans- 
portation back to India, the estates paying 
two-thirds and the Government one-third 
of the expense. From 600 to 700 return 
every year, and they take considerable 
money with them, it being the earnings of 
their indentured labor, or saved after the ex- 
]M ration of ^that term when working for 
themselves. During the past few years the 
amount thus taken back with them exceeds 
£10,000 ($48,665), besides a goodly amount 
invested in personal jewels and adornments. 

It is conceded generally that were it not 
for this indentured labor the agricultural in- 
terests of the islands would materially suf- 
fer, because, as a rule, the natives are not 
so willing to work as are the coolies. 



SOUTH AFRICA LINE. 



The Government Gazette of South .Africa 
publishes an agreement made between the 
I'nion of South Africa and the Conference 
Lines of steamships with reference to ex- 
port shipping rates on produce for Euro- 
pean ports, which reads : 

"The Government has secured for ship- 
pers the continuance of the present export 
shipping rates to June 30, 1911, for South 
African maize (corn), kaffir corn, oats, fruits 
and base metals. In addition, certain im- 
portant modifications in favor of shippers 
have been agreed to by the contractors. 
Present rates from all South African ports, 
and Delagoa Bay to Southampton, London, 
Hajnburg, and Antwerp, are : Maize, $2.80 
and 10 per cent, per ton (2,240 pounds) ; 
kaffir corn and oats $3.65 and 10 per cent. 
per ton (2240 pounds) ; fruit $6.08 and 10 
I)er cent, per ton of 40 cubic feet. 

"The contractors have now undertaken to 
utilize such space as may be available in 
the weekly mail steamers to convey maize 
in quantities of not less than 100 tons to any 
one of the following ports: I'.ristol, Belfast, 
Cork, Cardiff, Cherbourg, Dundee, Glasgow, 
Havre, Hull, Leith, Liverpool, Middlesboro, 
Portsmouth, Rotterdam and Swansea, at an 
additional charge of 85 cents per ton of 2,240 
pounds, plus 10 per cent, over and above the 
feight to the ordinary berth ports of South- 
ampton, London, Hamburg, and Antwerp, 
the maize to be transshipped at Southamp- 
ton to other steamers at the cost of the 
contractors. 

"The Govrrnment impresses upon shin- 
pcrs that, in order to prevent delay in ship- 
ment, it is extremely advisable to utilize 
the space available in homeward-bound ves- 
sels during July and August in preference 
to holding shipments over until September 
and subsequent months when the space in 
the vessels is required for the transport of 
wool, skins, and other more remunerative 
cargo then oflfering." 



The gross receipts of the Montevideo 
tramways, for the year ended October 31, 
1909, were $1,230,780, an increase over the 
previous year of $99,719. The operating 
expenses were decreased by $6,639, the net 
receipts being $512,577, an increase of 
$106,348. 



KRUPP STEEL WORKS. 

The F. Krupp Company on May 1, 1910, 
employed in its various works at Essen, 
Rheinhausen, Annen, Magdeburg, and Kiel, 
62,145 work people and 6,840 officials, clerks, 
etc., in its business staff, a total of 68,985 
persons, against 63,540 the year before. In 
the 60 different works of its great cast-steel 
establishment at Essen this company has 
in operation 7,500 machines, 18 rolling mills, 
171 steam hammers, 21 transmission ham- 
mers, 82 hydraulic presses, 435 steam boil- 
ers, 554 steam engines, having a total of 
89,430 horsepower, 2,690 electric motors of 
50,491 horsepower, 972 cranes, having a to- 
tal carrying power of 11,929 tons. From its 
own mines 2,426,728 long tons of coal were 
supplied. The company's gas works in 1909 
supplied 18,500,000 cubic meters of illumina- 
ting gas to the works and the city of Elber- 
feld. The 6 electric works of the cast-steel 
establishment fed 3,125 arc lamps, 32,194 in- 
candescent lami>s, and 2,690 electric motors, 
furnishing a total of 39,640,009 Kilowatt hours. 
.■\t the testing station of the cast-steel estab- 
lishment 220,000 metallic tests were made in 
1909, and 75,000 analytic tests in its chemical 
laboratory; on the 3 artillery testing grounds 
31.500 cannon shots were fired last year, con- 
suming 301,400 pounds of powder and about 
852 tons of projectiles. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



OCEAN TRANSPORTATION. 



A company has just been formed in Ham- 
burg, Germany, called the Anglo-Belgian 
and Hamburg Plate Line Company, to con- 
duct a fortnightly service between Hamburg 
and other western European ports and Bue- 
nos Aires. It is buying several ships to 
start with, and is having several others built, 
to be chiefly used as freighters, though first 
and second class passengers will also be 
taken. 

The Pacific Steam Navigation Company, 
one of the most powerful British steamship 
enterprises in South America, has invited 
tenders for two new steamers, each 600 feet 
long and with accommodations for L200 
passengers, for this new express — Liverpool 
to Buenos Aires service — to accommodate 
the increased passenger traffic resulting 
from the opening of the Trans-Andean Rail- 
way. It is stated that passengers from Aus- 
tralia and New Zealand can, if the new line 
from Sydney and Wellington to A^alparaiso 
direct is started, reach England and Europe 
faster via this new transcontinental South 
American route than by way of the Suez 
Canal, or by the present voyage around 
Cape Horn, stopping at Montevideo, and 
that the new trade commissioner sent to Ar- 
gentina by the government of the Dominion 
of New Zealand is investigating this ques- 
tion. 

The Royal Dutch Lloyd (Lloyd Real 
Holandes), the leading Dutch line to the 
River Plate, met with such success with its 
Hollandia and Frisia, which were placed on 
the Buenos Aires, Santos, Rio de Janeiro, 
Lisbon, Boulogne-sur-mer, and Amsterdam 
route in May and July, 1909, that its new 
Zeelandia left Amsterdam on July 20, 1910, 
on its first run to Buenos Aires. The vessel 
is to be equipped with the Marconi wireless 
telegraph S3'stem, will accommodate 1,300 
third-class passengers, and is expected to 
carry many immigrants from northwestern 
Europe. 

The Swedish commercial attache to this 
Republic recently stated that the Johnson 
line, the leading Swedish line to Buenos 
Aires, was to add two more ships to its pres- 
ent fleet, to accommodate the increased 
trade between the Scandinavian countries 
and the Argentine Republic. 



CONSUMPTION OF LIQUORS. 



For the fiscal year ending on June 30, 1910, 
the beer sales in the United States amounted 
to 59,485,117 barrels, of thirty-one gallons 
each, as compared with 39,330,848 barrels in 
1900. These figures are furnished by the 
Bureau of Statistics at Washington. There 
has been an increase of SL2 per cent in the 
ten years. Assuming that the population of 
the country will be found to be about 93,000,- 
000, which is a larger estimate that any- 
body was making until a few weeks ago, the 
population has increased 22.6 per cent in the 
decade. In the same ten years distilled spirits 
have increased in consumption to the extent 
of 44.9 per cent. 

And yet in this decade there has been a 
large gain in the number of prohibition States. 
There were only three — Maine, Kansas and 
North Dakota— in 1900. Half a dozen— North 
Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Ten- 
nessee and Oklahoma — have been added to 
the list in the past three or four years. More- 
over, in the decade many other States, by local 
exclusion acts, have shut out intoxicants, or 
pretended to do so, from counties and towns. 



While only 2,500,000 i:)cople resided in "dry" 
territory in 1900, 41,000,000 are there in 1910. 
How is it that while the area of the prohibi- 
tion region is steadily and rapidly expanding, 
the amount of malt and distilled liquors con- 
sumed by the people is increasing at a much 
greater rate than is population? It must also 
be borne in mind that the figures here given 
for consumption touch only the liquors on 
which taxes are paid to the Government. For 
obvious reasons the "moonshine" stills and 
breweries are not included. Nobody except 
those who run them knows anything about 
them officially, and they won't tell. That the 
number is large, however, is certain. More 
of all sorts of liquors is drunk now than ten 
years ago. This is manifest from the Gov- 
ernment's books. Of course, this means that 
the laws in the "dry" States and in some of 
the "dry" counties are evaded. They are 
evaded in Georgia and Oklahoma and the 
other States which adopted the exclusion fad 
in the last few years, just as they are in 
Maine, Kansas and North Dakota, where, 
technically, intoxicants have been outlawed for 
several decades. The query. Does prohibition 
prohibit ? must be answered by an emphatic 
neg:ativc. — .St. Louis Globe-Democrat. 



INFANT DEATHS IN GERMANY. 



The constant striving to diminish so-called 
infant mortality — that is to say, the death of 
infants under 1 year — has not been without 
success. In the years 1907 and 1908, 17 y> 
per cent, of the children born died ; in the 
years 1906 and 1905 the percentage was 18^^ 
and 20 J^, respectively. Consequently, within 
four years a relative decrease of infant mor- 
tality of about one-seventh has taken place. 
This improvement has been accompanied by 
a slight prolongation of the average length of 
life in Germany. This is at present about six 
or seven years longer than was the case in the 
previous generation. 

The better hygienic conditions of life pre- 
vailing, not only among children, but 
among grown-up people, have brought 
about this result. In Germany, as is the 
case elsewhere, the average length of a 
woman's life is considerably greater than 
that of a man. The average increase in the 
length of life during the last generation has 
been an equal one for both sexes. 

The decrease of infant mortality is not 
without its importance from a military point 
of view ; for as Surgeon-General von 
Schjerning of the Prussian army has recent- 
ly shown, this decrease in infant mortality 
has been accompanied by superior physical 
development in the surviving children. In 
like manner, the increase in the average 
length of male life has a certain importance 
from the military standpoint, especially 
since, according to the law of the year 1888, 
the age limit for military duty in the re- 
serve has been greatly extended. The 
more favorable the death rate, the smaller 
will be the number of gaps in the ranks of 
our old soldiers ; we mean those who, being 
physically fit, are still expected to serve their 
country in the "Landwehr." — Continental 
Correspondence. 



The Russian consul-general in Harbin 
has notified Russian shipowners and shi])- 
pers on the Sungarie River that customs 
duties imposed by the Chinese custom- 
house should be deposited in the Russo- 
Chinese Bank and not paid into the treas- 
ury of the Chinese Government. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 

International Seamen's Union of America, lyi 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Subdivisions. 

.Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, lyi Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

ALnritime Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

NLirine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 143 West Madison St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Bufifalo, N. Y. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Bay and River Stcamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Australasia. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 

29 Erskinc St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St.. Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus 
tralia. 

25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf, Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 
Great Britain. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E., 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull. 

Belgium. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Diepestr 
152, Antwerpen, Belgium. 

Germany. 

Zentralverband Seemannischer Arbeiter, Ham- 
burg 1, Bensenbinderhof 57, IV., Zimmer 54 
(Gewerkschaftshaus), Germany. 

France. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritimes de France, Marseille, II Place de b 
Joliette. 

Norway. 

Norsk .Sjomands Forbund, Stavanger, Norway. 

Sweden. 
Svenska-Sjomens-og Ekiarcforbundet, Stock- 
holiii, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 
Denmark. 
Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Holdbod- 
gade 11, Kid., Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Told- 
boldgade 8, Denmark. 

Holland. 
Algemeene Nedcrlandsche Zeemansbond, 2 e 
Atjehstr. 6, Amsterdam. 

Italy. 
Fcderazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Mare, 
Gcnova Vico Casosini, No. 8, Italy. 
Austria. 
Verband der Handcls-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
bciter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

Spain. 
Fcdcracion Nacional de Obreros de Mar de 
Buciues V puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 (Bar- 
ccloncla), Spain. 

Uruguay. 
Sociedad de Rcsistcncia de Marineros, Monte- 
video, Rampla 103, Uruguay. 

Argentina. 

Lcga Obrera (Sailors and Firemen) Sinforiano 
Corvctto. Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos) 
Uiid Suarez 44. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



The recent struggle to secure an 
eight-hour day has cost the North- 
umberland' (Eng.) miners £83,000. 

The Australian F"ederal Navigation 
Bill probably will enable the marine 
engine-drivers to qualify for a higher 
grade certficatc. 

Sydney (Australia) mechanical den- 
tists employed in dentists' workshops 
making and repairing teeth, plates, 
etc., are forming a union. 

Four union officials connected with 
the Perth (W. A.) tramways strike 
are to be prosecuted under the Con- 
ciliation and Arbitration .'\ct, but the 
strike still continues. 

The Melbourne (Australia) Tyi)o- 
graphical Society has decided on the 
annual appropriation of £400, to be 
placed to the credit of the unem- 
ployed relief fund. 

The Chief Commissioner of Rail- 
ways in Victoria, Australia, has given 
instructions that all rolling stock 
needed must be built in the State 
workshops at Newport. 

The secretary of the .Australian In- 
stitute of Marine Engineers in Syd- 
ney says that marine engineers cannot 
get employment in Australia without 
influence. 

German industry is seriously dis- 
turbed by strikes and lockouts. Un- 
less the disputes can be ended within 
the next few days 700,000 workmen 
will be idle. 

Immigration touts and head-hunt- 
ers in Europe exported last year 
6899 deluded emigrants to Queens- 
land, many of whom have been ab- 
sorbed in the ranks of the unem- 
ployed. 

The Queensland (Australia) police 
have been tardily conceded a slight in- 
crease of pay, and free uniforms, in 
consequence of the silent strike that 
has been going on among them for a 
long time. 

The members of the Victorian 
(Australia) Clerks' Union are con- 
sidering what steps they will take to 
prevent the unfair competition of 
young "ladies" of high social standing 
offering themselves as shorthand 
writers and typists at low rates of 
pay. 

A conference was recently held at 
Adelaide, South Australia, between 
representatives of the Liquor Trades 
Employes' Union and employers with 
regard to the wages to be paid for 
washing bottles. A scale of wages 
formulated by the union was accepted 
by the employers. 

A conference of the representatives 
of the New Zealand sheep-owners and 
shearers has agreed to refer matters 
in dispute between them regarding 
the shearers' rates of pay to three 
conciliation commissioners, each side 
undertaking to accept the finding of 
the commissioners. 

The FederatioB of Master Cotton 
Spinners met at Manchester, Eng., on 
September 19 and decided on a gen- 
eral lockout on October 1 unless the 
Fern Mill dispute at Oldham is set- 
tled before that date. In the event 
of a lockout, 150,000 operatives will 
be aflfectcd directly. 

When the representatives of the 
Iron Molders' Union submitted a re- 
port of the proceedings and recom- 
mendations of the recent Brisbane 
(Australia) Trade-Union Congress to 
their society recently, a motion was 
carried unanimously that the union 
at once affiliate with the Australian 
Labor Federation. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Caimon's Clothing Store 

Union Made Clothing for Sea Faring Men 

MEN'S SUITS MADE TO ORDER 
First Class Goods Low Prices 

f. M. &. C. B. CANNON 439 Front, 440 Beacon St., San Pedro 



BEN. B. LIPPMAN 

S3 2 BEACON & S3 J FRONT, next to Fritz & Erneit 
SAN PEDRO CAL. 

COMPLETE SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

Union Goodw for Union Men 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO, 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All groods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect eur 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BRO WIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am In position to know the class of goods you want. The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at SO cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 






JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
VIARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street, 

Between Front and Beacon 8ts., 

SAN PEDRO. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., GPP. 8. P. DEPOT, 

SAN PBDRQ, CAL. 



WALK-OVER SHOES 

SbLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 

LEVrSDEPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

515 Front St. 614 Beacon St. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cat. 

Dealers In 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories. 
NO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Fred Bjorn or Bjornsen, a native of 
Trondjem, Norway, is requested to 
communicate with his brother, H. J. 
Bjornsen. Address H. J. Bjornsen, 
Well Street Sailors' Home, London 
E., England. 

James Murphy, marine fireman, 
last heard of from Sydney, and sup- 
posed to be sailing out of San Fran- 
cisco, is inquired for by Ellen Mur- 
phy, Lawrence St., Liverpool. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Soren P. Nielsen, a native of 
.\arhus, Denmark, born 1887, is in- 
quired for by his sister. Address, 
Danish Consulate, New Orleans, La. 

.^rthur Taplett, age 18, last heard 
from at Wilmington, N. C, in April. 
1908, is inquired for by relatives. 
Please forward any information con- 
cerning him to Mrs. Eleanor M. Her- 
man, R. F. D. No. 4, Box 310, Ta- 
coma. Wash. 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Airo. Oscar Le Bloa. Sylvian 

Anderson, T. -557 Larsen, J. -1542 

Anderson, J. G. Michelson, J. 

Abell, B. Moss, A. 

Andersson, G. -41 Menz, Paul 

Andersen, A. M. Meyer, H. 

-1055 Moore, J. M. 

Andersen. A. 1447 Mesak, Eduard 

Anderson, J. -1514 McDonough, W. 

Adams, Jacob Maroth, Richard 

Ambearnsen, Algoy Mueller, Hugo 

Apps P Nielsen, Sivert 

Anderson, Martin Nielsen. A -1054 

Anderson, Charlie Newman, Uavid 

Anderson, Gust Nevander. Ale.x. 

Anderssen, Frank J^.^'^""' J"hn *-• 

Anderson, Carl Nordgren Chas. 

Arrhenius, Chas. gestor. W'lson 

Behrend, F. C. b'^'";"-J- „-^^^ 

Birry, James ??°::^.?''" ' 

Backman, Ernest SX^^'^V-^,.^ 

Hi-inHor XV Nclson. Eddie 

Hot"rom W Nicholas, Thomas 

Bentse"; Hans ?^,^f4''°'"v»^r..,.«r 

Boylan, C. J. (pkg) S 1,1 'p it? 

Blumquist, C. ^ ' a 'i, ,,,^n 

Bordjelm. Alex. Olsson, A. P. -1109 



Bowman, K. Hj. 



Olsen, H. -885 



Beyerly. Kupert 9'^^"' ^V^, 

Bell, Frank M. Ottesen. Chas. 

Carlson, Carl SPPf".!?"' ^■ 

Christensen. M. O^st. Ost 

Christiansen, Eigil Olsen. Hagbart 

Chrlstenson. H. X, '^^"■t, . ' 

Dibble, P. W. O sen. Pete 

Eugene, John O sen. George A. 
Emanuelsen, A. -G61>* f|°"'„V~ a 

Erickson Jolm Olsen. Ole A. 

EHckiseA, J. E. 01ss°n Johannes 

Fletcher Billv Passon. Bruno 

FasS^'hon'"'' ?|?s'^r"F"rit1'=" 

Fritzheim, R. ?!^t°";,„ n h iij.i 

Frantsen, N. -562 ^l^lo'^^^^-.Hb;"'-* 

Gustavsen, Gustav E?rf°r'„ t ',,„ 

Graham, L. M. g^l!'"!""' i°''" 

Gunwalds, G. P^*«^f°"w'^- 

gronvoT' re"'? Pete%ten,''kudolf 

GuSon, Johan Pf't"*" • O^" 

Gutman, E. ^^<itn, ' 

Henriksen, Albert „'} . „ 

Hogstrom, A. Peterson, A. K. 

Heckman, Fred Persson, Hj -1230 

Hedlund, Arvid E®"^'"^°"v^''?L, 

Haltnes, Magnus Petersen C. -1092 

Hansen. H. -2060 E^^'l"'*"'^"/!"'', d"^ „ 

Heide, Tom Petersen, M. (Pack- 

Hjelt, Nick „^^^'t, , 

Hillig. Albert S'l"'^^''"* t x,r 

Helmar, O. (Pack- gobshani, J. W. 

a„g) Raymond. J. 

Hansen, Carl Sl^iJ?^"' «?iit'"'^^ 

Harris. John E. ^?^°J^- (fJ^'^Jr 

Hilke, Carl 11.'^°^,;.?^^ 

Hansen, Peter K. IPJ^" .^"w^ro^.n 

Hassan, G. Sievers. Herman 

Hansen L. -794 i?''f"sen. Ing 

Hansen Hans fly ^s. Everett 

Husby, Lars l''^'^"^' "^"^«n7 

Isaacksen, Kristen |°'"?"sen. C. -1607 

Isaacson. Gustav fcott. E. G. -2041 
InKebretsen. O. -125 |P!,«„;'"^' p"?!''^ 

John. Robert l'"lPh i.^h; 
Johansen, CM. -IS'Jafl" 't- i°*'?„v„„ 

JanscheWiU, J. I^^rlnsen J»™^s 

•J°'i?"f^°^' ^; -'"^ IrdTAIbelT 



Janson. G. W. 



Saarlnen, H. 



Johansen, Herluf stephan 'm 

Johnstadt, J. S. Samson,' Kristian 

Johnsen, A. G. Svensen. G. -1579 

Johansson A. -2050 Schlosser, L. 

Jensen, 1311 Sjostrom, Gus 

Jolinson, G. B. Schutte, Richard 
Jellrngs, R. V. 



Strom, C. -1648 
ShoU. F. K. 



Scarabosia. M. 



Johansen, J. -1462 
Jobsen, Ch. 

Janson, Julius o ,., », 

Kinsey, W. A. -207 |"?'"V ^\,„ ,, 

Koikih, Fred Schluter, Paul 

Kopp. Franz ,^,?'?^""^V^1^ °- 

Kustel, Victor .J,'"'"'^"' ^- ?• 

Keilman, Joe lt°"^''.Sv ?**"' 

Koso. Pete ThOT, Walno 

Kusik. M. Tetter, Anton 

Kleishman. F. Tufte, A. Paulsen 

Kallas, Alex. Tuominen, Alfred 

Kristensen, Jens Touanne, Walter 

Kallas, M. Utby. Carl 

Larsen, Martin J.?,"?*^ 1'"-,^^''; 

Larson, Jack JJ, f."^*^"' '^■„f- „. 

Lindegard, John S''-'.""''"'..!^ ' i^^' 

Lewis, George H. S:"?t«'|; Charles 

Larsen. Klaus L. Wrig, Ferdmand 
Leith, Chas. . Wychgel, J. 

Louis. Michael ^\ erner, Henry 

Larsen, Cliris. T. Wallace, Luke 

Larsen. Christian Wilemsen, H. 

Lange, Freidrich Youngren, E. 

Lyche, Harris Zorning, Arthur 

Lang, Gust. Zornow, Herbert 



When Drinking Beer 
See tliat this Lahel is 
on the Keg or Bottle 




ALL LOS ANGELES BEER 
IS UNFAIR 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's lonrnal 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The steamship Cottage City arrived at Seattle 
on September 29 from Skagway, Alaska, with 
$210,000 in gold bullion. 

Captain Nelson Anderson, a well-known Coast 
mariner, died at the Oregon Sanatorium, at Port- 
land, on September 21, from an abscess of the 
brain. 

Three more salmon packets from the Alaskan 
canneries arrived at San Francisco on Septem- 
ber 23. The ship Sintram and the barks Star of 
Alaska and Star of France were the arrivals. 

Johannes Swansen has been appointed master 
of the steamer Noyo, vice Charles Lehrndcr; H. 
G. Bell of the steamer Hercules, vice F. H. Cruth- 
ers; J. W. Saunders of the steamer Pennsylvania, 
vice C. J. Holland. 

The steamship Victoria, at Seattle on Septem- 
ber 23, from Nome, Alaska, brought news that a 
three days' storm beginning September 6 did 
great damage to small vessels, lighters and 
dredgers at Nome. 

Advices from Mare Island Navy Yard state that 
a letter has been received from Navy officials at 
Washington, indicating that the Navy collier 
Prometheus is to be converted into an oil-carry- 
ing steamer. 

Rasmus Jepsen has been appointed master of the 
steamer Governor, vice H. C. Thomas. The bark 
Levi G. Burgess, C. M. Wilson, master, was en- 
rolled at the San Francisco Custom-house on Sep- 
tember 23 for the coasting trade. 

A claim for damages has been filed l)y Cap- 
tain George Maloney against the schooner R. C. 
Slade at Aberdeen, the owner of which is the 
Slade Lumber Company, the allegation being that 
Captain Maloney was injured due to negligence. 

It is generally understood in shipping circles 
that the American ships Atlas and Astral, now 
on the Coast, will be with the big salmon packet 
fleet of the Alaska Packers' Association, when 
they clear from San Francisco next year for the 
northern canneries. 

On a charge of negligence in allowing the 
steamship Watson to run on a reef ofT Waddah 
Island on the night of September 1, Captain John 
Griffith, the master, was tried before the Board 
of Marine Inspectors at Seattle on September 27 
and the case taken under advisement. 

When the Danish bark Denmark, Captain H. 
G. Neilsen, was within two days of Honolulu, en 
route from Leith, Scotland, to Portland, where 
she arrived on September 24. a sailor by the name 
of Magnusson fell from the rigging and was 
drowned. 

Allen Pasquiao has libeled the American 
schooner David Evans at Honolulu for $5600 
damages he claims because, as he alleges, the 
captain hit him upon the head with a pair of hand- 
cuffs, seriously injuring him. Captain Sanders' 
side of the story is that the sailor hit him first. 

Charles Lcrnder has been appointed master of 
the steamer Brunswick, vice George Hamar 
Hammar; John J. Jennings of the schooner Trav- 
eler, vice M. H. Jennings, and Fred Mathcson of 
the steamer .Sonoma, vice George Jepsen. The 
steamer Sea Rover was enrolled at the San Fran- 
cisco Custom-house on September 28. 

Last season's catch of 12.920 seals ofT the Priby- 
loflf Islands, according to an estimate made by 
Commissioner Bowers, will net the United States 
$500,000. Heretofore, under the system of leasing 
the fur seal privileges, the Government realized 
about $150,000 a year. Last season's catch was 
made under the supervision of the Department of 
Commerce and Labor. 

Bates & Chesebrough, who have put on an 
independent line of steamers to carry cargo to 
New York, via the Istlimiis, in competition with 
the Pacific Mail Company, announced on Sep- 
tember 27 that they now have enough cargo in 
sight to maintain a weekly service, instead of 
bi-monthly sailings, as heretofore scheduled. 

In the matter of the collision on October 2, 
1905, between the steamer Umatilla and the steam- 
schooner Aurelia, Judge Farrington, at San Fran- 
cisco on September 21, handed down a decision to 
the effect that both vessels were to blame, and re- 
ferred the case to the Commissioner for the pur- 
pose of dividing the damages and costs equally 
between the two parties. 

It is reported that arrangements are under way 
for the charter by the Canadian Mexican Pacific 
line of two steamers now on the other side of the 
Coast. This line was recently organized to take 
over the service maintained by the Canadian Mex- 
ican line on the Pacific. A subsidy of $50,000 a 
year is given by the Canadian Government for 
the servi:e. 

As the result of a compromise of the claim for 
the stranding of the British steamer Gymeric at 
Komari Point May 16. the vessel has passed out 
of the hands of /\ndrew Weir, and is now owned 
by the underwriters. The Gymeric was insured 
for $170,000, and the underwriters compromised 
on an arr;ingement to pay the company $140,000 
and take the steamer. 

A steamship line between Sealtle and Panama 
has been organized to carry freight only and to 
connect with a similar fleet plying between Colon 
and New York. The steamers of the new line 
are the Mackinaw, Stanley Dollar and George H. 



Fenwick. The Mackinaw will sail for Panama 
October 10, and thereafter there will be a sailing 
for the Isthmus every two weeks. 

W. H. Smith has been appointed master of the 
schooner Magnolia, vice Robert Ramsey, and 
Peter Christiansen of the schooner Champion, 
vice W. H. Perkins Enrollments were entered at 
San Francisco on September 20 of the steamer 
Svea, C. E. Allen, master; the steamer Dispatch, 
J. J. Carey, master; the steamer Capital City, G. 
H. Goodell, master. 

The California Atlantic Steamship Company, 
whose plans for the establishment of a line to 
Panama have already been widely discussed, tiled 
articles of incorporation at San Francisco on Sep- 
tember 28. The stock is held, by the following 
board of directors: Henry Sears Bates, $166,600; 
J. W. Chapman, $166,600; John E. Gushing, $166,- 
600; Albert G. Bates, $100; William B. Acton, 
$100. 

Sir James Mills, founder and president of the 
Union Steamship Company, will come to San 
Francisco to complete arrangements with the 
Oceanic Steamship Company for the establish- 
ment of an agency for the line of two vessels 
that the Union Company will soon inaugurate 
between San F"rancisco and the Colonies. The 
steamers Aorangi and Maitai are being over- 
hauled for the run and are now at Wellington. 
N. Z. 

Two new steamboats, the Orteric and Luceric, 
of the Weir .Steamship Company, now loading at 
Cardiff and Glasgow, respectively, will soon start 
on their long passage to Puget Sound, where they 
will be added to the Waterhouse line to the 
Orient. The Orteric is taking on coal at Cardiff 
for Valparaiso and other Chilean ports, while the 
Luceric will take a general cargo from Glasgow 
and Liverpool to Seattle and British Columbia 
ports. 

A thirty-inch globe of latest make, possessing 
many features not obtainable heretofore, attracted 
much attention at the Merchants' Exchange, San 
Francisco, on September 29, and will be a valu- 
able adjunct to the charts, maps and other nauti- 
cal guides which the marine department has for 
the guidance and edification of shipping men. 
The globe was purchased for the Exchange by its 
president, James Rolph, Jr., and is a product of 
W. and A. K. Johnston. 

Charles H. Ehlert has been appointed master 
of the gasoline steamer lone, vice P. M. Clark; 
H. C, Nason of the steamer Signal, vice Clifton 
Curtis; Alexander McLaughlin of the Crowley 
No. 9, vice George W. Matson; John A. Eleasser 
at the steamer James S. Higgins, vice W. F. Hig- 
gins; Clifton Curtis of the steamer Fullerton, vice 
F. A. Grant. The steamer Sea Foam, Alexander 
Henriksen, master, was enrolled at the San Fran- 
cisco Custom-house on September 27. 

The Norwegian fishing steamer Bertha was lost 
on the rocks of Barras Island en route from 
Hongkong to Japan early in September, according 
to advices received by the steamship Teucer, 
which arrived at Victoria, B. C, on September 
29 from the Orient. The whaler encountered a 
gale and was driven on the rocks. The captain 
and crew of eleven men took to the small boats 
and drifted two days, when they were picked up 
by the ste.'imshi]) Germania and taken to Manila. 

Bringing 18,171 cases of salmon, to the Alaska 
Packers, the ship Santa Clara, Captain .Stindt, ar- 
rived at San Francisco on September 27 after an 
ordinary passage of nineteen days from Alitak. 
The Star of Peru, which arrived on the 26th, 
brought 22,700 cases and was thirty-four days 
from Kvichak. There are now only four packets 
remaining to reach port from the Alaskan can- 
neries. They are the Star of Russia, Star of 
Scotland, Star of Finland and Star of Greenland. 

Reports from the East confirming the an- 
nouncement of the sale of the steamers Har- 
vard and Yale for service on the Pacific Coast 
were received at San Francisco on September 
30, and it is rumored that the purchasers are the 
former owners of the Alaska Steamship Com- 
pany. The Harvard and Yale have been on the 
run between Boston and New York during the 
summer for several years. They are twenty- 
knot boats and are reported to have cost $1,250,- 
000. 

The Pacific Mail steamer Pennsylvania, Cap- 
tain Saunders, sailed from San Francisco on Sep- 
tember 30 for .Ancon direct, laden with a full 
cargo of general merchandise, which will be 
routed to New York by way of the Isthmus. 
This is the first sailing on the company's new 
schedule. The Bates & Chesebrough direct line of 
freight steamers was inaugurated on October 1, 
when the Stanley Dollar sailed for .Ancon, also 
laden with a heavy cargo of freight. Bates & 
Chesebrough now have four fine steamers on 
berth for tlieir service, the latest addition being 
the steel steam-schooner Olson & Mahony. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims of 
all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, California St., near 
Montgomery. Telephones, Kearny 394; Home, 
C 3832. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary -Treasurer, 
1% Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me.. 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 Soutti St. 
PHILADELPHIA. Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 221 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumalne St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass.. 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA. Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va.. 228 Water St. 
MOBILE. Ala.. 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine' St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y.. 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md.. 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK. N. Y., 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL. N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO. 111.. 674 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE. Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O.. 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND. O.. 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
TOLEDO. O.. 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA. N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies: 
DETROIT. Mich.. 7 Woodbridge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis.. 1721 Third St. 
BAY CITY. Mich.. 108 Fifth Ave. 
KINGSTON. Ont., Canada (Box 96). King St. 
ERIE, Pa., 328 German St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR. O.. 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO. 111.. 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY. O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y.. 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St.. N. W. 
CHICAGO, III., 316 W. Kinzle St. 
DETROIT. Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, O., 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, O., 9D5 Day St. 
TOLEDO, O., Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Fraser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO. N. Y.. 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich.. 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO. O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA. N. Y.. 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y.. 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY. Mich.. 919 Water St. 
ASHTABtrLA HARBOR, O.. 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND. O., 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO. 111.. 242 South Water St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. 317 Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency: 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 
One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



$1.00 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
npon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
ilre.ss all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoflice as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief. legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 5, 1910. 



THE TIMES EXPLOSION. 



Tlie I, OS Aiiijeles Times has been at war 
with the labor movement for many years. 
Thront^hout that period the labor movement 
has fouiEjht back with all the means — lawful 
and honorable means — at its command. The 
Times ])lant has been destroyed by explosion 
and fire, and twenty lives have been lost. 
Conclusion : The labor movement is directly 
responsible for the disaster ! 

Such is the attitude assumed by many 
persons. Perhaps this attitude is consistent 
in those who jud^e the labor movement by 
the promptinsjs of their own human im- 
pulses. These persons, knowing that The 
Times has for years blackguarded the labor 
movement to the very limit of human en- 
durance, assume that violence on the part of 
the latter is but a natural and inevitable 
result. 

From this viewpoint there is no mystery 
in the affair. It is clearly a case of malice 
or madness engendered by mutual hatred : 
resulting in acts of the most frightful conse- 
quences. This reasoning, simple, logical and 
inescapable as it may appear, is entirely 
wrong, because entirely superficial, and the 
conclusions reached thereby are directly con- 
trary to all the reasonable probabilities that 
will immediately occur to the mind of any- 
one who gives the matter a mf)mcnt's serious 
thought. 

Knowing the labor movement as we do, 
being familiar with its history, including 
many incidents similar to that of The Times 
explosion, we do not hesitate to say with 
absolute confidence that the labor move- 
ment of Los Angeles has had no part in 
or knowledge of the plot or whatever it 
was that caused the explosion. To say any- 
thing less would be to bear false witness 
against the whole history of the labor move- 
ment, its motives and, conduct. 

In saying this, we speak of the labor 
movement not merely in the general and 
official sense, but also in the specific and 
individual sense. Neither the labor move- 
ment as a whole nor its members as indi- 
viduals can reasonably l)e accused of par- 



ticipation in such an affair. Every consid- 
eration of lo3'alt)' to the labor movement is 
against the presumption of guilt on the part 
of any one identified with that movement. 
Every reasonable presumption of guilt 
points in other directions and to certain 
quarters as yet entirely unsuspected by the 
superficial observer. 

We do not consider it necessary to ex- 
press our horror at The Times explosion, 
to extend sympathy to the victims, nor to 
declaim in strong language against the per- 
petrators of the outrage. We assume that 
our sentiments in this connection are taken 
for granted. At any rate, we know of noth- 
ing in the record of the Journal, the Sailors' 
L^nion or the labor movement that can pos- 
sibly justify any suspicion of indifference 
toward or sympathy with murder, arson or 
assassination. Consequently we know of no 
need for asseveration on the score, nor of 
any good purpose to be served by such a 
course. 

On the contrary, there is good reason for 
directing attention in other channels. In 
the circumstances of the present moment, 
our first duty is to protect the good name 
of the labor movement, to see to it that 
no harm shall come to that movement at 
the hands of those who would point the 
finger of suspicion at it either designedly or 
in sheer despair of finding any more reason- 
able clue to the perpetrators. Indignation 
at the crime and pity for its victims are 
worthy sentiments — sentiments that are 
shared equally by every normally consti- 
tuted being. Rut when these sentiments 
arc indulged to the extent of attaching 
suspicion to the first individual or organiza- 
tion that falls under the eye, they become 
dangerous and ought to be restrained. The 
feeling of the moment ought to be encour- 
aged as a spur to the discovery of the real 
criminals, and discouraged in so far as it 
expresses itself in blind attacks upon inno- 
cent persons. "Let no guilty man escape !" 
is a good rule, but "Let no innocent man 
suffer!" is a better rule. 

The probabilities of innocence or guilt in 
any particular quarter may be best deter- 
mined by a consideration of the effects of 
the explosion and consequent loss of life in 
the respective quarters. It is well known, 
especially by the labor movement, that vio- 
lence of any kind is prejudicial, and often 
fatal to labor's cause. On the other hand, of 
course, those who are ijivolved in disputes 
with the labor movement benefit correspond- 
ingh' by such outbreaks. It is therefore to 
the interest of the labor movement, both as 
a matter of humanity and as a matter of 
self-defense, to discountenance and abso- 
lutely prevent violence. This the labor 
movement does, effectively in the main and 
honestly at all times. To repeat: There is 
alisolutely no ground, either of motive or 
method, to suspect the labor movement or 
any individual member thereof of complicity 
in The Times explosion. To repeat again : 
All the reasonable probabilities lie in the 
direction of other interests — the interests 
that stand to gain by the disaster. 

One imperative duty confronts the labor 
movement in common with all other classes. 
The causes of the explosion must be ferreted 
out to the last detail. Let the truth be fully 
known, no matter who or what may suffer 
by the exposure. The only responsibility of 
the labor movement in the matter is that 
of aiding by every means at its command in 



uncovering the source of the crime. This 
the labor movement is now doing and will 
continue to do. When the truth is known, 
punishment will follow. Until then those 
who know the labor movement will judge it 
by its own principles and practices, rather 
than by the accusations of its enemies. 



PRESS ON THE EXPLOSION. 



As usual in such cases, a great deal of 
hysterical talk has been indulged in by the 
press, following the explosion which de- 
stroyed the ])Iant of the Los Angeles 
Times. No comment need be made 
upon the statements of Otis and his sub- 
ordinates to the effect that the explosion 
was caused by the "enemies of industrial 
freedom," other than that, besides being 
characteristic of their attitude toward labor, 
these utterances were the product of dis- 
ordered minds. However, there have not 
been wanting some evidences of sanity in 
the discussion of the question of responsi- 
bility. James M. Lynch, President of the 
International Typographical Union, has this 
to say on the subject: 

The Los .-Vngeles Times has for many years 
been a bitter, unrelenting and unreasoning enemy 
of trade-unionism, and it is characteristic of the 
Times managemeiu that, immediately after the 
explosion whicli wrecked its plant, and without 
awaiting any investigation as to the cause of the 
catastrojjhe, it should charge the disaster to the 
trade-unions, as was done by the Times' assistant 
general manager. The Typographical Union re- 
sents and refutes this charge. We have defended 
ourselves against the attacks made by the Times 
as best we could, but we liave always fought fair. 

TJie International Typographical Union is not 
a lawbreaking. dynamiting institution; its record 
of more than sixty years' existence is an honor- 
able one and entirely free from resort to violence 
of any kind. It has won its cause and reached 
its present position of strength and influence 
solely through the justice of its contentions and 
the lawful and orderly manner in which its aims 
have been prosecuted and made effective. 

No one regrets tlie Times catastroplie more 
than I do, and especially the loss of life follow- 
ing the explosion. On the other hand, we are 
determined to protect ourselves against the op- 
portunity that will be embraced by General Otis 
flud his subordinates to attempt to fasten the ex- 
plosion on the trade-unions. To-day I caused to 
be sent to our representatives in Los .\ngeles the 
following telegram: 

"In conjunction with the president and board 
of trustees of No. 174, take such measures as may 
appear necessary to protect the International 
Typographical Union and local union from any 
charge of complicity with alleged dynamiting of 
Times office. Press reports convince us explosion 
was caused by faulty gas mains and due. entirely 
to unsanitary condition of Times plant." 

The Bee, of Sacramento, Cal., noted for 

its forthrightness in such emergencies as 

well as for fairness in its judgments, speaks 

as follows : 

In a certain sense the labor unions feel them- 
selves on trial, because the excited finger of pub- 
lic suspicion points their way; because only too 
many public men and only too many public jour- 
nals have adopted the entirely un-.\merican at- 
titude of holding such labor unions guilty until 
Ihey prove themselves innocent. 

It is not necessary to comment upon the mani- 
fest injustice of such a position. 

That the labor unions feel this keenly is shown 
by the protests of their leaders; by the fact that 
the unions were the first to offer large sums for 
the apprehension of the dastards; by the fact that 
the Typographical Union, which certainly has 
never believed in violence, is permitting its mem- 
bers to assist its bitterest enemy to get on its feet 
again. 

It is, therefore, wisest and just for all to sus- 
pend judgment until the facts shall come out. 

A suspension of judgment as to the identity of 
the guilty does not mean in anv sense the slight- 
est palliation for the hellish offense. 

It simply means that — while all should hold 
sternly to the ultimatum that whoever hath done 
this deed shall die the death — it does not follow 
that any would be justified in saying now to any 
man or any set of men: "You have committed 
this murder." 

Another fair and dispassionate view is 
that of The Daily News, of San Francisco, 
which says : 

Sympathy for the families plunged in grief by 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



the terrible tragedy involved in the destruction 
of the plant of the Los Angeles Times is the 
first emotion felt by the people of the entire 
State as the death roll is reported. Whether the 
loss of a score of lives be due to accident or to 
the mad act of some irresponsible, the horror 
which will be felt is based upon the blotting out 
of these lives without warning or chance of es- 
cape. 

If the building really was dynamited, there is 
in that fact a terrible possibility of new mis- 
fortune for Los Angeles. No one who knows 
the bitterness of the labor struggle in which the 
Times took part will doubt that its friends will 
charge the crime to the unions now engaged in 
the metal trades strike. Preposterous as it may 
appear, that any sane workingman would de- 
liberately give such a weapon to labor's enemies, 
we have the examples of the Haymarket hangings 
and the Colorado bullpens to illustrate the ex- 
tremes to which a public frenzy, incited by the 
deep hate that characterizes the Merchants' and 
Manufacturers' Association of Los Angeles, may 
go. 

Let the guilty men. if guilt appear, be found 
out and brought to trial. L-et the trial be worthy 
of a civilized community, and not a mockery to 
.American justice. 

Organized labor is doing a mighty task for 
hunnnitv. It has no crimes to condone, no in- 
vestigations to fear, Strugeling for the masses 
whose misery has been rendered more bitter by 
the attacks of General Otis, it scorns to use tlv 
weapons of anarchy. It is so common a thing for 
union men to be shot, beaten, starved, imprisoned 
or outlawed that the T^os 'Xngeles public mav in 
'ts terror of to-day forget labor's training. Union 
labor wishes no one the tragedy that is its daily 
portion. Tt mourns with the widowed and or- 
nhaned. Tt offers the sympathy of those who 
have carried the same cross. 

And in all fairness it asks for calm judgment 
on the facts as they shall appear. 

"Calm judgment on the facts as they shall 
appear." Exactly ! We can only add that 
calm judgment can only be hoped for from 
those who are willing to grant the "pre- 
sumption of innocence." The man or news- 
paper who shall proceed to judgment upon 
the assumption that the labor movement 
must be assumed to be guilty until it 
"proves itself innocent" is by that circum- 
stance disqualified from passing any judg- 
ment at all. 



SAILORS ILL-TREATED. 



Editor of The T^edger: In vour issue of yes- 
terday, the 19th, you published an item in refer- 
ence to the experience of sailin.a: ships off Cape 
Horn, and the blame was laid chiefly to the in- 
comnetence of our modern sailors, thev being 
lacking in seamanship, and you referred to other 
days when men went to sea. I do not suppose 
you gave much thou.ght to the conditions which 
have wrought this change. I am, and have been 
for quite a number of years, pulling sheets and 
braces for a living, and consequently know some- 
thing about ships and the men who sail them. 
When we compare the present time with 40 or 
.SO years ago we note on every hand and in most 
every branch of industry that great progress has 
come with the times, but if we study the condi- 
tions under which sailors are still living we find 
that very little progress has been made to make 
their lot any better than it was in the days of 
slavery, and the little that has been accomplished 
for their benefit has been done by sailors' organ- 
izations under the most discouraging conditions, 
and this betterment applies to the coasting trade 
only. Even to-day. in blue water ships, a sailor 
is reckoned little better than a slave, especially in 
English ships, which are a disgrace to any civil- 
ized nation. There the food is barely sufficient 
to keep the spark of life in the body, and T have 
seen English sailors on the West Coast and else- 
where, after working coal all day under a blazing 
tropic sky, in order to get some of the coal dust 
and sweat out of hair and skin, iump over the 
ship's side into the salt water, risking the danger 
of being devoured by sharks, devilfish, etc. They 
had drunk their miserable whack of water early 
in the morning, the whack being one gallon per 
man, minus a big share which was used to cook 
their "salt horse" and "sea breeze." American 
ships, although giving better food, treat their 
crews so badly that a man having the dignity of 
a yellow dog will not make a second voyage in 
one of them. Now, as all classes of men have 
progressed and bettered their conditions, it is not 
fair to suppose that intelligent sailors would have 
advanced somewhat, intellectually, and seeing that 
their conditions, treatment, etc., were moored 
fore and aft — to use a nautical expression — would 
they not have left a life of degradation and en- 
tered some other calling in which they would be 
treated as free men and not as slaves? This is 
exactly what has happened, and as a result 
crimps and sharks pick up all the derelicts 
of humanity they find floating around sca- 
I)ort towns and shipmasters are glad to get them. 
Any kind of a failure, be he a logger, a tailor, a 



baker or a candy maker, is sent away to sea, and 
this is why so much canvas and gear is carried 
away off the Horn and elsewhere. So many un- 
fortunate, helpless incompetents are where tliey 
should not be. There is not the slightest doubt 
that if sailors were treated as men and given con- 
ditions equal to people ashore, that we would have 
as good, and in some respects a better, class of 
sailors to-day than at any previous time. — J. 
Squires in Tacoma (Wash.) Ledger. 



CONDITIONS THAT CONCERN LABOR. 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



who are punishers of small crimes and who show 
no indignation at the hold-up games of the legal- 
ized extortionist, if there are any of these who 
think that the labor union is to be crushed, they 
are thoroughly mistaken. The trade-union has 
done much to make life worth livng; it has de- 
veloped a higher type of man. woman and child; 
it has made the lot of the human family better 
and happier. Yes, the labor union stands for the 
making of progress. The Dred Scott decision 
was given a few years before the shackles were 
stricken from the limbs of the black slave. The 
Taff-Vale decision was given shortly before the 
trade dispute act of 1906 was placed upon the 
statute books of Great Britain and the decision 
of the Supreme Court of the United States in the 
Hatters' case was given in 1908. 

Brothers, my concluding words to you are: 
Get ready! 

Keep before your attention the fact tliat the 
history of the labor movement is the history of 
civilization. Tt has manifested itself in all times 
and under all conditions of life. The eternal 
query of life is, and always has been, how to ob- 
tain comfort. The prayer, "Give us this day our 
daily bread," is as needful to-day as ever in the 
lifetime of the race, and this demand for sus- 
tenance is supplemented by the hope of equity. 
So long as outward evidences of aggregated 
prosperity are present society is apt to forget or 
neglect to know the conditions of some of those 
who contribute to the result. To meet the re- 
sponsibility as at present with the labor win.g we 
must qualify not only as defenders of industrial 
conditions, but of political conditions a.; well. 
.Attend to the matter without delay, so that when 
the call is sounded the discipline as learned in 
our school of unionism may prevail to the extent 
of evolving a higher and a more equitable politi- 
cal condition that will bring with it a broader 
industrial liberty than that which at present pre- 
vails. — Wm. J. Shields, in The Carpenter. 



FROM A CONTEMPORARY. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal announces its ar- 
rival at the good old age (for a trade-union pub- 
lication) of twenty-four years. This is worth 
noting for several reasons. Among them might 
be mentioned the satisfaction given to the Jour- 
nal's contemporaries, who look forward weekly 
to the arrival of one of the ablest and cleanest 
labor papers received among their exchanges. 
Editor Walter Macarthur and Manager Paul 
Scharrenberg man their journalistic craft in ex- 
cellent fashion, and we offer our congratulations 
with the hope that very many years of continued 
success may be the portion of the Coast Seamen's 
Journal and its staff. — Labor Clarion, San Fran- 
cisco. 



ENGLAND AND SUEZ CANAL. 



In view of the building of the Panama 
Canal by the United States Government, 
the following information concerning the 
investment made by the British Government 
in Suez Canal shares is of interest : The pur- 
chase price of the Suez Canal shares was 
$19,3,^2.037. The amounts received for in- 
terest and dividends for the five years up 
to January 1, 1910, were : 190.S-6. $.^12.\997 ; 
1906-7, $.\129,427; 1907-8, $5,488,543; 
1908-9, $5,150,577; 1909-10, $5,140,034. There 
was received for interest and dividends 
from January 1, 1895, to January 1, l')10, 
l)olli inclusive, $66,661,718. 

Prior to July 1, 1894, interest on the pur- 
chase money was paid by the Khedive of 
Egypt. The total amount so paid from the 
date of purchase was $17,690,645. It will be 
noted that the investment, which was se- 
verely criticized at the time it was made, 
has proved an exceedingly profitable trans- 
action, and has yielded very large profits 
to the shareholders. 



A ])crmanent exhibition of Spanisli prod 
nets has been opened in Montevideo. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Hcad(iu;irtcrs, San Francisco, Oct. 3, 1910. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7:30 p. m., R. Roilo presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping mediuhi. R. Houston was ap- 
pointed F^irst Patrolman during the absence of 
E. A. Erickson. who is representing the union at 
the convention of the State Federation of Labor 
at Los .Angeles. 

A. FURUSF:TH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St. Pacific Phone Kearny 222R 
Home Phone J 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 27, 1910. 
Situation good. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
122 Alexander St. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 26, 1910. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull; 
prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle -Agency, Sept. 26, 1910. 
Shipping medium; prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend .Agency, Sept. 26, 1910. 
No meeting; no (luorum. Shipping poor; pros- 
pects poor. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
229^^ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 141 J. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 26, 1910, 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

HARRY COOK, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. 225. 



Porthmd, Ore., Agency, Sept. 26, 1910. 
Shipping dull. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka .\gency, Sept. 26, 1910. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping fair; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

JOHN W. ERICKSEN, Agent, 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro .Agency, Sept. 26, 1910. 
Shipping fair. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 20, 1910. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

CHAS. SORENSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



liead(|uarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 29, 1910. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping fair. Harry Pothaff was elected 
to serve as delegate to the California State Fed- 
eration of Labor, vice Thos. Ellis, wiio resigned 
on account of ill health. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency. Sept. 22. 1910. 
Shippin.g improving. Nominated delegates for 
the coming convention of the Tnternation;il Sea- 
men's Union of .America. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
P. O. Box 1335. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 27, 1910. 
No meeting. Prospects fair for shipping. 

ED. BARRY, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Hcad(|uarters, Chicago, Sept. 26, 1910. 
Strike situation improving. 

ALEX. McKECHNIE, Sec'y pro tem. 
674 West Madison St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



nead<iuarters, Boston, Mass., Sept. 26, 1910. 
.Shipping medium; prospects fair. 

PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary pro tern. 
l^A Lewis Street. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




ON THE GREAT LAKES. 



(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Uniooi.) 



«^4i^ 



ANTICS ON THE MARSHALL. 



I was one of a crowd on Rush street re- 
cently, when the scab steamer Albert Mar- 
shall passed on the 19th. I had a good 
chance to observe the crew and used my op- 
portunity accordingly. The skipper and a 
wheelman occupied the bridge. The first 
mate was not in sight. A passenger was the 
only man on the fo'c'sle head, three men (or 
what did duty for men) were taking ofif 
hatches. The second mate and second cook 
were aft. As she came close to the abut- 
ment of Rush street bridge, it looked as 
though her starboard bow was going to hit. 
The captain said. "Hard a starboard," and 
as he spoke turned to look aft, with his hand 
on the telegraph, and the .scab ground her 
hard a port. The "old man" shoved him 
away from the wheel and pointing at the 
port anchor-brake, yelled, "Let go that an- 
chor!" He managed to get the hook on the 
bottom in time, and as the steamer swung 
clear the captain shouted, "Heave it up 
again !" And the scab evidently thought 
that one brake-wheel was to let go and one 
to heave up with, for he promptly let go the 
"right bower." The steamer was by this 
time right in the "draw" of the bridge, and 
while the hooks were being hove up, a vol- 
ley of remarks more forcible than polite 
came from the teamsters, auto drivers and 
pedestrians who were delayed, as this is the 
busiest street in Chicago. 

I heard afterwards that the Marshall had 
the same trouble at Wells street. 

Say, we hear some talk of the Lake Car- 
riers raising wages. Any strike I ever 
heard of, .scabs got more, sometimes twice 
the money paid to men ; but the Pere Mar- 
c|uette of the Chicago Duluth Transporta- 
tion Com])any pays wheelmen $50, watch- 
men $4.5, ordinary-seamen $25 for scabbing. 

Fraternally, John Parkkr. 

Chicago, 111. 



FOR THE "INDEPENDENTS." 



The so-called Independent Vesselowncrs, 
according to the newspapers, are complain- 
ing about the scarcity of cargoes and are 
talking of .sending .still more of their vessels 
to the dock for the balance of the season. 
The Cleveland Leader, in its issue of Sep- 
tember 21, publishes the following report 
from Two Harbors : 

The following information relative to the re- 
ceipts of coal at Two Harbors was received by a 
local shipper yesterday. The receipts of coal 
at the local coal docks have been large during the 
present year, being about 150.000 tons more than 
.Tt this time last season. Since July 1 the follow- 
ing boats have discharged cargoes at Duluth & 
Iron Range docks: Steamer Briton, July 2, 3,102 
tons; steamer Roman, July 3, 3,080 tons; steamer 
Hill, July 6, 8,200 tons; steamer Elphicke, July 7, 
4,324 tons; steamer Corsica, July 11, 3,073 tons; 
steamer Harvard, July 12, 7,412 tons; steamer 
Roman. July 14, 3,004 tons; steamer Matoa. July 
15, 2,882 tons; steamer Colgate. July 17, 2,821 
tons; steamer Empire City, July 19, 6,337 tons; 
steamer Morse. July 20, 7,130 tons; steamer Joliet. 
July 24, 2.583 tons; steamer Maruba, July 26, 3,041 
tons; steamer Van Hise, July 27, 7,216 tons; 
steamer La Salle. July 29. 2,680 tons; steamer 
Manola, July 30, 1.645 tons; steamer Cort, 
.August 1, 2,708 tons; -steamer Ellwood, .August 
2, 6,192 tons; steamer Cornell, .August 3, 7,657 
tons; steamer Van Hise, August 6, 7,442 tons; 
steamer Gilbert, .August 12, 3.580 tons; steamer 
Crescent City, August 15, 6,311 tons; steamer 
Wawatam, August 14, 2,509 tons; steamer Corona, 
August 19. 3.070 tons; steamer German, .August 
21, 3,196 tons; steamer Cornell, .August 24, 7,603 
tons; steamer Mariposa, .August 24, 3,840 tons; 
steamer Corona, August 29, 3,120 tons; steamer 



Rensselaer, August 29, 7,525 tons; steamer Cort, 
.August 31, 2,815 tons; steamer Robert Fulton, 
September 4, 6,017 tons. Total, 142,030 tons. 

Here we have a total of thirty-one cargoes 
of coal, discharged at Two Harbors between 
July 2 and September 4 — a total of 143,030 
tons in two months and two days. Thirty- 
one vessels, all Steel Trust except one, the 
Elphicke ! This should open the eyes of the 
so-called independents to the -fact that, 
though the Steel Trust is perfectly willing 
to allow them to help pay the enormous cost 
of fighting the seamen's unions, it is not at 
all willing to allow them to get any of the 
pie, but uses them only as catspaws. 



A "SAILOR" AT SEVENTEEN. 



Conneaut, .Sept. 22. — Harry Wilton, 17, a sailor, 
was hit on the head with a beer bottle last night 
by two thugs. When he recovered an hour later, 
he found he had been robbed of $25. 

The foregoing from the Cleveland Plain 
D^-aler of September 23, stuck away in an 
obscure corner, so as to avoid notice of the 
scabs, is rather hard on President Living- 
stone, of the Lake Carriers' Association, who 
testified before the Committee of ^lerchant 
Marine and Fisheries, that the Lake Carriers 
do not em])loy minors to man their vessels. 
"Harry Wilton, age 17, a sailor"! The child 
ought to be in school, learning his duty to 
his fellows, learning to be something more 
than a blot and a curse to his fellow-work- 
ers, learning the great lesson of manhood, 
instead of pitting his puny strength against 
his own class, and aiding his masters to 
make even his hard lot harder. 

A scab, and at the tender age of 17! Con- 
.sorting with scabs, the scum of Southern 
Europe, and of the big American cities. 
Learning the lowest depths of degradation 
to which a boy may fall. Struck down with 
a beer bottle from which he had probably 
just drunk! 

\Miy ])arents will allow their children to 
l)e guilty of sucii conduct is beyond me. 
"Harry Wilton, age 17, a sailor"! God save 
the mark! W. H. Jknkins. 



UNKNOWN WRECKS LOCATED. 



.\n unknown wreck, supposed to be that 
of the wooden steamer George Stone, which 
sank in Lake Erie, of¥ Point Pelee, last fall 
with a loss of six men, has been located not 
far from the gas buoy at Grubbs Reef by 
fishermen. 

Those who have examined the hull and its 
position report it to be a menace to boats 
of light draft that might be in the vicinity. 
Over the boiler there is but six feet of 
water, while on either side of the hull the 
water attains a depth of fourteen or fifteen 
feet. The wreck is so badly battered that 
the fishermen who found it could not iden- 
tify the vessel, but it is generally supposed 
to be the Stone, which was carried off the 
reef during the winter by the ice floes. 

A Canadian Government vessel made an 
examination of the vicinity of Grubbs Reef 
this spring, and reported that the wreck had 
disappeared. The Canadian Lake Survey 
boat Lambton, which is at present on Lake 
Erie, will make a search for the wreck, and 
if found, the remains will be buoyed and 
marked, preparatory to their removal. 



MORE "WELFARE" ACCIDENTS. 



The Cleveland Leader, of September 20, 
says : 

The barge Smeaton, in tow of the steamer 
Maricopa, while coming down through Lit- 
tle Rapids Cut, below the Soo, took a sheer 
to port and struck the steamer Lakeland, 
formerly the Cambria, of Cleveland, on the 
port bow, cutting a hole three to six feet 
wide, from below the waterline to the upper 
deck. The Lakeland filled her after tank on 
the starboard side to keep the hole above 
water. 

The Smeaton had her towing chock 
knocked off and it went overboard, her for- 
ward capstan was bent, her port side hawse 
pipe was broken and the stem pushed in 
about a foot. 

When the crash came the Maricopa let 
go her line and was not damaged. She went 
back to the Soo and is now on her way 
down. The Smeaton will remain at the Soo 
until Captain W. W. Smith, marine superin- 
tendent of the Pitt.sburg Steamship Com- 
pany, arrives and looks her over. 

The Tvakeland was also taken to the Soo 
and will be temporarily repaired before she 
leaves there. She was bound up. The 
Lakeland, which was formerly owned by the 
Pittsburg Steamship Coinpany, and then 
known as the Cambria, was last year sold 
to the Port Huron & Duluth Steamship 
Company. She was operated all season as a 
passenger and ])ackagc freight boat. 

The steamer M. A. Bradley was reported 
aground near Amherstburg, coal laden. She 
went on the rocks in a fog Monday night 
and her No. 2 tank was punctured. Part of 
her cargo was lightered and the tug Goukler 
went down to pull on her, accompanied by 
the lighter Rescue. The P)radley is owned 
by the Lradley estate, of this city, and was 
built three years ago. She is sailed by Cap- 
tain Matthew Mulholland. 

The big wrecking tug Favorite has gone 
to P>uffalo to pull on the steamer Clifford 
Moll, aground near the mouth of the Niag- 
ara River. 

It will be necessary to have four plates 
replaced on the steamer Watt, which is in 
drydock at this port, and her stern bearings 
need repairing. 

The steamer James Watt will be docked 
at this port next week for some minor re- 
pairs. 

The new steamer W. J. ( )lcott was docked 
at Ecorse yesterday. 



P.e it known that since the "Welfare" 
plan appeared on the Lakes, the Steel Trust 
I)arges have dispensed with seamen and 
carry deck hands. ("Experience not neces- 
sary") at $30 per month. One of these was 
probably steering the Smeaton when "her 
wheel chains parted." They always do 
"part," you know ! 



On September 20 the fishing tug Cisco, 
when about thirty miles northeast of Ashta- 
bula Harbor, found the badly decomposed 
body of a man with brown hair, heavy 
shoes, woolen shirt and clothing nearly 
worn away. He was possibly one of the 
men lost last winter when the carferry was 
sunk. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



TONAWANDA BUSY. 



The biggest rush of lumber to the Tona- 
wandas by vessel this season is now on and 
the prospects are that it will continue until 
well into October. Besides the fourteen 
boats recorded as having arrived up to Sep- 
tember 15, twelve other vessels arrived du- 
ring the following week with lumber, ma- 
king the total number of cargoes for the 
seven days twenty-six. There were four- 
teen more scheduled to arrive last week, 
which will insure September as the largest 
month of the season in the amount of lum- 
ber to be received at the Tonawandas. 
Unless something occurs to hold up the 
boats due to arrive, a total of forty vessels 
will have reached the Tonawandas within 
two weeks. 

The boats now unloading at North Tona- 
wanda are the steamer Ed. Smith and 
barges Grace Holland and Iron City, steam- 
er F. R. Buehl and barge Stewart, steamer 
C. H. Green and barges Genoa and Our 
Son, steamer Cataract, steamer Kongo, 
steamer Lycoming and barge Hutchinson 
and steamer Earth and barge Helvetia. 
Among the boats to arrive are the steamer 
Arizona, steamer Toltec, barge Ed. Kelley, 
steamer Simon Langell and barges Arenac 
and S. K. Moore, steamer United Lumber- 
man and barges Jennette and H. M. Stanley, 
steamer Argo, steamer Robert Holland, 
steamer Myron and barges Page and Gos- 
hawk. 



LIVINGSTONE CHANNEL DELAYED. 



Opposition on the part of Amherstburg 
residents will probably tie up work on the 
new Livingstone Channel in the lower De- 
troit River for several months to come, ac- 
cording to Colonel C. McD. Townsend, 
United States engineer in charge of the 
project. Colonel Townsend sent a letter to 
Superintendent Locher, of the firm to whom 
the contract for widening the channel was 
granted by the Government, advising him 
not to commence work on the new section. 

"As I understand the matter, the residents 
of Amherstburg have taken their grievance 
to Ottawa through their representative," 
said Colonel Townsend. "This means that 
the opening of the Livingstone Channel will 
be delayed for a considerable time, as the 
Canadian Parliament would probably refer 
the matter to an international body, during 
which time work will necessarily be at a 
standstill on the channel. 

"The widening operations call for an addi- 
tional LSO feet to the present width of 300 
feet in the new channel. I will not open 
the channel unless the proposed dam from 
Bois Blanc to Stony Island is erected, as it 
would materially effect the levels of the river 
and Upper Lake. The lessening of one inch 
in depth on Ballard's Reef is of much more 
importance to me than the increase of 150 
feet in the width of the new channel." 



The arrival at Cleveland of the steamer 
McKinstry from Montreal with a cargo of 
flaxseed, shipped originally at Calcutta, de- 
veloped the fact that there is a scarcity of 
flaxseed in this country at the present time. 
The cargo was consigned to the Sherwin- 
Williams Company to be used in the manu- 
facture of linseed oil. 



STRIKE 

ON THE GREAT LAKES 

COMRADES: 

The strike of Sailors, Firemen and Cooks 
on the Great Lakes is still on. We appeal 
to all seafaring men to assist us in persuad- 
ing seamen to stay away from the Lakes 
during this strike. 

Any reports that the strike has been set- 
tled are false. 

The Seamen of the Great Lakes are sticking to- 
gether solidly, and will keep up the battle for 
freedom and decent conditions until the fight is 
won. "God Almighty hates a quitter." (So do 
we.) 

Lend a hand, comrades, by inducing seamen to 
stay away from the Lakes while the strike is on. 
Yours fraternally, 

LAKE DISTRICT, 

International Seamen's Union of America. 

STRIKE ON THE GREAT LAKES 
KEEP AWAY! 

The Union. 

Sail on good sliip, the future state, 

Sail on, O Union strong and great! 

Humanity, with all its fears. 

With all the hope of future years. 

Is hanging breathless on thy fate. 

We know what true men laid thy keel, 

What workmen wrought thy ribs of steel, 

Who made each inast, and sail and rope, 

What anvils sang, what hammers beat, 

In what a forge and what a heat 

Were shaped the anchors of thy hope; 

Fear not each sudden sound and shock, 

'Tis of the wave and not the rock; 

'Tis but the flapping of the sail, 

And not a rent made by the gale. 

In spite of rock and tempest's roar. 

In spite of false lights on the shore 

Sail on, nor fear to trust the sea; 

Our hearts, our hopes are all with thee. 

Our Iicarts, our hopes, our prayers, our tears, 

Our faith triumphant o'er our fears 

Are all with thee — are all with thee. 

— Longfellow. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



TO REPLACE NO. 18. 



James C. Wallace, President of the Ameri- 
can Shipbuilding Company, has obtained the 
contract for the building of the new carferry 
for the Pere Marquette Railway Company. 
The new vessel will operate on Lake Michi- 
gan in place of No. 18, which was lost re- 
cently, and will be completed and ready for 
business January 15, 1911. 

The new carferry will cost al)OUt v$400,000, 
and she will have capacity for thirty cars. 
She will be 350 feet long, 56 feet beam and 
I9y2 feet deep. The steamer will have 
triple expansion engines, and steam will be 
furnished by four Scotch boilers. 

This is the third order for carferry steam- 
ers that the lake shipbuilders booked this 
year. The steamer building for the Mar- 
quette & Bessemer Dock & Navigation Com- 
pany at the local yard of the American Ship- 
building Company will be completed about 
the middle of next month. She will be oper- 
ated between Conneaut and Port Dover. 

The Toledo Shi])building Company is 
l)uilding a carferry for the Ann Arbor Rail- 
road Company. This boat is to be delivered 
next December. She will rim between 
Frankfort, Mich., and Manitowoc, Wis. 



For fair products of all kinds patronize 
the Journal's advertisers. 



Charles Bourroughs, No. 2745, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by his father. 

Findlay J. McDonald, No. 5499, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by John D. Mc- 
Donald, Highland Park, Mich. 

Comrade Henry Blaschke. Any one 
knowing the above-named comrade please 
communicate with Jno. Rook, Jr., 2564 E. 
55th St., Cleveland. 

Roy Person, No. 12522, L. S. U., is in- 
quired for by his sister. Miss Hazel Person, 
225 Chisholin street, Alpena, Mich. 

William Young, a marine fireman, aged 
50 years, last heard of twelve years ago, is 
inquired for by his sister. Address, Mrs. 
Anna M. Mills, 644 W. 61st street, Chicago, 
111. 



BARGE BEING DYNAMITED. 



Wreckers at work on the remains of the 
sunken barge Grace Whitney, at Detroit, 
salvaged all of the cargo of soft coal avail- 
able, and the work of dynamiting the craft 
commenced recently. The big dredge 
Handy Andy, which was at work during the 
past week, secured nearly 500 tons of the 
cargo of 615 tons in the hold of the vessel. 
The coal will probably be purchased by Am- 
herstburg parties. 

Two tugs are assisting in the work of 
dynamiting the boat, as most of the wreck- 
age will have to be towed to a dumping 
ground out of the path of vessels. After the 
big timbers are removed from the water, 
the bottom will be swept so as to afford a 
clear depth of twenty-five feet in that vi- 
cinity. The work on the wreck was rushed 
by Harbormaster Barrett, of Amherstburg, 
in order to prevent a recurrence of the acci- 
dents of the past two weeks when several 
vessels struck on the submerged craft. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY, 



The wreck of the old Fred Kelly, lying off 
Whiskey Island, Cleveland, was partially 
destroyed by fire on September 20. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

674 West Madison Street, Ciilcago, ill. 

Teleplione, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Teleplione 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. T 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 21 High Street 

Telephone Bell 175 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 1890. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 Third Street 

Telephone, New Phone, Broad 155 L. 

BAY CITY. Mich 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96) King Street 

ERIE, Pa 328 German Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 113 92nd Street 

Telephone 2853 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 



HOSPITAL AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, II>L., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



RELIEF 
Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtnbula Harbor, O. 
nuffalo, N. Y. 
Dulutli. Minn. 
lOscanaba, Mich. 
Grnnd Haven, Mich. 
Groen Bay. Mich. 
HouKhton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 



STATIONS. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marf|uette, Mich. 
Mllwnukee. Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
.Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan. Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior. Wis. 
Toledo- O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



MODERN BUENOS AIRES. 



As nearly thirty per cent, of the popula- 
tion of Argentina live in incorporated pla- 
ces of over 50,000 inhabitants, and as fully 
20 per 'cent of them live within a 20-mile 
radius of the federal capital, Buenos .Aires, 
which is to a ijreater extent than any other 
capital in the world the concentrated center of 
commerce, industries, manufactures, popu- 
lation, and wealth of the entire country, 
some account of the growth of this, the 
fourth cit}' in the two Americas, during the 
year 1909 may be of interest. However, 
it should never be forgotten that Buenos 
.\ires is not the Argentine Republic, and 
that no one can have a true idea of that Re- 
public without a close knowledge of all the 
more important 24 provinces and territories. 
While onl}' 12,397 buildings were erected in 
Buenos Aires in 1909, as against 12.542 in 
1908 and 13,148 in 1907, many of them were 
very large, modern office I)uildings built of 
structural steel of a type utterly unknown 
four years ago. 

The largest hotel and the largest office 
building in South America were completed 
in Buenos .-\ires in 1909, both built by ar- 
chitects and with materials from the United 
States. Buenos .Aires is being transformed 
by the new "skyscrapers" and the large, 
modern apartment houses built in the semi- 
French style. It is said that six years ago 
steam heat was almost unknown in Buenos 
Aires, where the winter season, though 
short, can be cold and damp, while to-day 
every new apartment house has a good sys- 
tem of steam heating. The old one-story 
houses are rapidly giving way to more 
modern structures. There are not enough 
houses to accommodate the population of a 
city which gains some 60,000 inhabitants a 
year, forming an additional reason for the 
constantly increasing cost of living. 

Of the many municipal improvements car- 
ried out or begun in 1909 under the super- 
vision of M. Bouvard, the eminent French 
landscape gardener, the new Congress Park 
will provide a breathing space the size of 
the White House grounds in Washington 
in the heart of the city for all time, and the 
broad new streets in the suburbs will great- 
ly help future traffic. 



HOLIDAY RAIN INSURANCE. 



Insurance has been made to cover almost 
every hap])ening in England, such as the 
death of the sovereign, climatic conditions 
affecting the success of a pageant, a horse 
show, an agricultural fair, etc., and now a 
new form of insurance has been inaugura- 
ted which will enable persons whose holi- 
daj-s have been marred by rain to obtain, 
under certain conditions, monetary com- 
pensation. 

Underwriters are prepared to insure 
against one-tenth of an inch of rain falling 
on more than two days a week at any towns 
on the south and east coasts of England 
between Bournemouth and Scarborough, 
where the daily rainfall is either officially 
published or where satisfactory records can 
be obtained. 

Upon the payment of 7s. Ck\. ($1.82), for 
which a policy will *be issued for 7 days, 
compensation is agreed to be paid at the 
rate of 10s. ($2.43) per day on excess of 2 
wet days ; 10s. insures against an excess of 
4 wet days in a fortnight; 12s. 6d. ($3.04) 
insures against an excess of 6 wet days in 
3 weeks, while 15s. ($3.65) insures against 



an excess of 8 wet days in a period of 28 
days. In each of these instances the com- 
pensation is 10s. ($2.43) a day for the days 
in excess of the prescribed number of wet 
days. If the insured desires to double the 
amount in the way of premium he receives 
double the amount as compensation. If 
higher compensation is desired, a propor- 
tionately higher premium will be charged. 
The underwriters will accept a certificate of 
the British Rainfall Organization as evi- 
dence of rainfall. The policies will provide 
that the greater portion of the one-tenth of 
an inch of rain, the quantity w'hich by the 
terms of the policy will constitute a wet 
day of 24 hours, must fall during the day- 
time. 



REBUILDING MESSINA. 



An English syndicate, headed by .Mr. Sin- 
clair Foley, proprietor of the Dail Mail, has 
made a proposal to the Italian Government 
to rebuild the Government properties in the 
Alessina district, destroyed by earthquake 
in December, 1908. 

It seems that the syndicate is ready to un- 
dertake the construction of the port (piers, 
breakwater, ferry slips, etc.), military bar- 
racks, university, court buildings, jail, post- 
office. Governor's offices and residence, city 
hall, sewerage, drainage, etc., all of which 
are to be completed within 5 years' time. 

The journals state that through Mr. Foley 
the banking firm of Stimons & Co., of Lon- 
don, is ready to advance the Government 
$115,000,000 at 3 per cent, per annum to car- 
ry out the work. .As far as can be learned, 
the matter h^s not yet taken the form of a 
definite resolution before the Italian Cham- 
ber of Deputies. 

It is the opinion of the consul that the 
present conditions at Messina offer a field 
for .American enterprise in contracts for re- 
moving debris, and reconstruction and build- 
ing of all kinds, provided that Italian legal 
conditions lend themselves to such enter- 
prises. A bill has passed the Chamber of 
Deputies establishing the rights of prop- 
erty in the destroyed districts and removing 
other legal and technical difficulties which 
have heretofore hindered the rapid advance- 
ment of reconstruction in the larger centers. 



BAKERS ADVANCE PRICES. 



The London bakers have decided to raise 
the price of bread by y^d. (1 cent) on the 
4-poun(l loaf. A rise in the ]:)rice of beef and 
mutton, it is said, is also anticii)ated. 

A circular has been issued by the Lon- 
don Master Bakers' Protection Society giv- 
ing as a reason, for the proposed increase 
in the price of the 4-pound loaf, that no 
other course was open because of the in- 
crease of 3s. to 4s. ($0.73 to $0.97) in the 
price of a sack of flour (280 pounds). When 
the additional '^d. (1 cent) is added there 
will be a minimum charge of 6d. (12 cents) 
for a 4-pound loaf and of 6>4d. (13 cents) 
for the best quality. 

A London baker stated recently that even 
at 13 cents a loaf, the flour costing 33s. 
($8.02) a sack, the profit was only Is. 9d. 
(42 cents) per sack, as it costs 14s. ($3.41) 
to convert a sack of flour into bread. 

The additional charge on a 4-pound loaf, 
it is said, will be a great benefit to hun- 
dreds of small bakers, who, with the present 
high price of flour have been conducting 
their business, if not at a loss, at least with 
a slim margin of profit. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATrORM. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the .American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. Tlie abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
.States where they do not e.xist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
cliildrcn in all cities. 

16. Tlie Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interest for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of LInited States Gov- 
ernment Postal .Savings Banks. 

INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Contiriuefl from Pape 5.) 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C. 1.'2 Ale.xander St.. P. O. Box 
1365. 

TACOMA. Wash., 2218 North .30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash.. 1.312 Western Ave.. P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND. Wasli.. Ill Qulncy St.. P. O. 
r.ox 48. 

ABERr>EEN. Wash.. P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND. Ore.. 51 Union Ave. 

EUREKA, Cal.. 227 First St.. P. O. Box 327. 

SAN I'EORO. Cal.. P. O. Box 67. 

fTONOT.TTI.T^ JI. T.. Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts.. 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. ftl Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408V4 Western Ave., P. O. Box 
.«75. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. C:il.. .'.l Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. Wash., 209-210 Powell Building, P. O. 
Rox 1335. 

SAN PEDRO. Cal.. P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

..XSTORI.'V. Ore., P. O. Rox 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CO.XNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
.\BER|iKEN'. Wash., P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORdlCTOWN. Wash. 

SKAGIT FIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wash., P. O. Box B. 

COOUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSIER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORIXO. Alaska. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
I'ETEU.SBrRG, Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. '.<Z Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE Wash.. 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA. Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO. Cal.. 200 M St. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

r.-in he proi-urPd hy seamrn at 
anv of Ihp nl'ove-tiipritionecl places: 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASI* 

29 ERSKINE STREET. SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



PUBLIC UTILITIES IN LONDON. 



In the case of domestic service, 5 pel 
cent, per annum of the ratable value of the 
building supplied is charged for water, viz : 
If the premises are rented for $1,000 a year, 
the water rate would be $50 per annum. 
There is no additional charge for high serv- 
ice. Where water is supplied for domestic 
purposes to a separate tenement with rata- 
ble value exceeding $1,460, not assessed to 
the inhabited house duty, and occupied 
solely for the purposes of any trade or busi- 
ness or of any profession or calling by 
which the occupier seeks a livelihood or 
profit, the board must allow a rebate from 
the water rate of not less than 20 nor more 
than 30 per cent. The minimum charge, 
however, after allowing the rebate, may not 
be less than $73 per annum. 

Where the owner of a building agrees to 
pay the water rate, whether the building is 
occupied or not, the board may make an 
abatement not exceeding 20 per cent. 

Where water is used for other than do- 
mestic purposes, the following is the scale 
of charges per quarter per 1,000 gallons, the 
minimum charge being $5.57 : Not exceed- 
ing 50,000 gallons, 22 cents; 50,000 up to 
100,000 gallons, 20 cents ; 100,000 to 200,000 
gallons, 19 cents; 200,000 to 500,000 gallons, 
18 cents; 500,000 to 1,000,000 gallons, 17 
cents; 1,000,000 to 3,000,000 gallons, 16 
cents; 3,000,000 to 5,000,000 gallons, 14 
cents : 5,000,000 gallons and upward, 12^ 
cents. 

To local authorities, for cleaning sewers 
and drains, cleansing and watering streets, 
supplying public pumps, baths, and wash- 
houses, and watering public parks and gar- 
dens, the rate is 12 cents per 1,000 gallons. 

The rent for meters, the diameter of 
whose inlet and outlet does not exceed 8 
inches, ranges from $6.08 to $6.32 per quar- 
ter, according to the length of the diameter. 

While reserving power to charge by me- 
ter or on area, the board has adopted the 
following scale for garden supplies, for the 
season, where the consumption of water and 
the size of the garden are not, in the opinion 
of the board, exceptional : Where the rata- 
ble value does not exceed $243, $2.43 ; not 
exceeding $487, $3.65; not exceeding $974, 
$4.86. Where the premises exceed $974 
ratable value or a sprinkler is used, the 
garden supply is separately afforded by me- 
ter at the trade scale, but without imposing 
a minimum rate. 

There are seven London companies fur- 
nishing gas, and the charges vary from 49 
cents per 1,000 cubic feet to 69 cents, the il- 
luminating candlepower being from 14/8600 
to 16/9200. There is a discount allowed by 
most of the companies of from 2^4 to 5 per 
cent to large consumers, 10 to 20 per cent, 
for power, and 10 to 25 per cent, for gas 
engines. The charges for gas meters vary, 
being as follows in four companies : First 
company, 49 cents for 3 lights to ^36 for 
500 lights ; second, 40 cents for 3 lights to 
$3.90 for 50 lights; third, 73 cents for 3 
lights to $12.16 for 200 lights; fourth, 73 
cents for 3 lights to $29.20 for 500 lights. 
The average charge per 1,000 cubic feet for 
public lamps ranges from 49 to 59 cents. 

The rates of subscription (including one 
telephone at the subscriber's premises) are 
as follows : 

Ordinary message-rate service: (1) Char- 
ges for connection with any exchange in the 
county of London within 2 miles of the sub- 
scriber's premises, annual subscription, £5 



($24.32) ; message fees, 2 cents for each call 
to a subscriber on any exchange in the coun- 
ty of London, 4 cents for each call to a sub- 
scriber in any exchange outside the county 
of London. (2) Charges for connection 
with any exchange outside the county of 
London, within 2 miles of the subscriber's 
premises, annual subscription, £4 ($19.46) ; 
message fees, 2 cents for each call to a sub- 
scriber on the same exchange, 4 cents for 
each call to a subscriber on any other ex- 
change. The minimum yearly amount pay- 
able by each subscriber for message fees is 
$7.30. 

The telephone trunk lines which connect 
the various telephone exchange areas 
throughout the Kingdom are under the con- 
trol of the Postmaster-General and are 
worked by his officers. The trunk lines can 
be used by callers at post offices which are 
connected with the trunk telephone system, 
as well as by subscribers and callers using 
telephone exchanges. The fees for the use 
of the trunk lines are as follows : Up to 23 
miles, 6 cents; 23 to 50 miles, 12 cents; 50 
to 75 miles, 18 cents ; 75 to 100 miles, 24 
cents ; every additional 40 miles or fraction 
thereof, 12 cents. 

The charge is 12 cents for the first 12 
words, including the address, and 1 cent for 
every additional word. With the exception 
of words which are ordinarily written as 
one, or coupled by hyphens, no combination 
of words is counted as one word. Such ab- 
breviations as "can't," "won't," "don't" are 
counted as single words. Figures are count- 
ed at the rate of five figures to a word ; frac- 
tions according to the number of figures em- 
ployed, the mark of division being counted 
as a figure. Thus, "i^" counts as one word, 
"2^4" as one, "109j^" as two. In groups 
of figures a stop or oblique stroke is counted 
as a figure. When words are underlined, or 
placed in parentheses, or within inverted 
commas, one extra word is charged for. 
One word each is also charged for the or- 
dinary signs of punctuation, if they are re- 
quired to be transmitted. 



SHIPPING AT LIVERPOOL. 



The annual return of the Mersey Docks 
and Harbor Board of the shipping of the 
River Mersey for the year ending July 1, 
1910, shows a slight decrease in the total 
tonnage entering and leaving the port of 
Liverpool, and also in the total amount paid 
for rates on account of the same. 

The return gives a comparison of the 
number and tonnage of vessels which have 
paid rates to the dock board, together with 
the amount of rates and dues received on 
vessels for goods for the two years 1909 and 
1910, ending July 1. While there was a 
slight increase of 162 vessels paying rates, 
there was a decrease in the grand total ton- 
nage of 93,408 as compared with the pre- 
vious year, the figures being 16,654,071, 
against 16,747,479 in 1909. This represents 
the total net register tonnage of vessels pay- 
ing rates to the board inward or outward. 
To arrive at the total tonnage entering and 
the total tonnage leaving the River Mersey, 
it is necessary to double the figures stated, 
or about 33,308,142 tons for the year ending 
July 1, 1910. The income derived from 
"rates on vessels," and from "rates and dues 
on goods," was $6,617,832, against $6,627,- 
052 the previous year. 



TEXTILE TRADE DISPUTES. 



For fair products of all kinds, consult the 
Journal's ad columns! 



What would have been a serious strike in 
the cloth-manufacturing industry of the 
West Riding of Yorkshire has been settled. 

While there are but 250 willeyers and fet- 
tlers employed in the 34 mills of Leeds, 
their demands, if ending in a strike, would 
afifect 3,500 or 4,000 other workers, while 
20,000 persons would have been thrown out 
of employment in the entire West Riding, 
as the would-be strikers are engaged in the 
preparatory stages of cloth manufacture. 

The following concessions were demand- 
ed by the willeyers and fettlers charter: 
Wages, 12 cents per hour and no overtime; 
55^'<^ hours per week ; rfot less than one man 
to a set of machines; no employment during 
meal hours, and no piecework. The Leeds 
union, which comprised 200 of the 250 men 
enq^loycd in this line, contended for the 
whole list. On June 24 a conference was* 
had and a settlement made on the folowing 
terms : Hours of labor 58 per week, viz : 
W/i hours per day for five days, and 5>^ 
hours on Saturday, exclusive of mealtimes, 
at 12 cents per hour, and 13 cents per hour 
for overtime. This agreement is to hold for 
four years. At Huddersfield, the Colne and 
Holme Valleys, and the Kirburton district 
the terms of settlement, also very recently 
made, are slightly different. The hours of 
labor are fixed at 55>^ per week instead of 
58, and the wages at 5i>^d (11 cents) an hour 
and 6>4d (13 cents) an hour for overtime. 
The mills will continue to work 58 hours 
per week, but the extra hours will be at ov- 
ertime rates. This means an increase in 
wages on full time from 24s. 2d. to 26s. 9j'^d. 
($5.87 to $6.51) per week. The remainder 
of the terms of agreement refer chiefly to 
disputes and the manner of their settlement. 

Leeds and district has comparatively lit- 
tle business in this line with the United 
States, but the Huddersfield section has a 
large trade therewith. This comes from the 
fact that the products of the Leeds district 
are not of a kind sought by American buy- 
ers, but are of a cheaper variety. The 
shoddy-trade section of Batley and Dews- 
bury furnishes cloth for ready-made cloth- 
ing manufacturers, and none of this enters 
into the American trade in any way. 

This amicable adjustment of old disputes 
within the past month has brought about 
a better feeling in the woolen trade, which 
is one of the important industries of York- 
shire. 



WHALING IN SOUTH ATLANTIC. 



Seven whaling companies now occupy 
sites in the island of South Georgia, where 
the whole carcass of the whales is converted 
into oil and fertilizers, says the British co- 
lonial report from Stanley, the capital of 
the Falklands. Six companies fish in the 
waters of the South Shetlands, pursuing the 
whale through Pelgica Strait to the icy 
shores of Grahams Land. The 1909 season 
in the dependencies was a good one, but was 
not so remunerative around the Falklands. 
A station at New Island, fitted with the 
latest machinery and lighted by electricity, 
was completed during the year. There were 
exported from the Falklands last year 4,006 
tons of whale oil, worth $221,426, against 
2,929 tons, worth $275,930, in 1908, and 
2,400 tons, worth $910,000, in 1907, which 
shows a wide variation in market values. In 
190^ there were no shipments. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



News from Abroad. 



The German Ministry of War ha? 
announced that it will give $25,000 as 
a pri^^e for an overland aviation com- 
petition. 

China is declared to be on the verge 
of another upheaval similar to the 
Boxer uprising and the lives of for- 
eigners are said to be in jeopardy. 

George Chavez, the Peruvian avia- 
tor, who recently flew across the 
Alps, died at Dorredossola, Italy, on 
September 27 as a result of injuries 
received while alighting. 

The Persian National Council on 
September 24 elected Nasir-Ul-Mulk, 
former Premier and Minister of Fi- 
nance, Regent to succeed Azad-Ul- 
Mulk, who died on the 22nd. 
■ The cholera situation at Naples is 
reported as grave. There have been 
fifty cases and thirty deaths. The lo- 
cal authorities will not admit as yet 
that the epidemic is cholera. 

Serious rioting has broken out in 
Turin, Italy, over the heavy rise in 
house rents now being efTected in 
view of the international exhibition of 
industry and commerce to be helel 
there next year. 

Professor Doria, chief of the Board 
of Health of Rome, Italy, announced 
on September 26 that there have been 
four cases of Asiatic cholera in that 
city. One of these proved fatal, 
while the others are recovering. 

Violent storms, accompanied by del- 
luges of rain, have done inestimable 
damage to the vineyards and olive or- 
chards in Southern Spain. Eight vil- 
lages, including Lorca and Ciza, are 
under water from three to six feet 
deep. 

The National Egyptian Congress, 
at Brussels on September 24, adopted 
a resolution declaring that English 
occupation of Egypt was illegal and 
demanding immediate evacuation and 
restoration of the constitution of 
1881. 

Lieutenant Helm, an alleged Ger- 
man spy, was remanded at London on 
September 20 on a misdemeanor 
charge, "Unlawfully sketching the 
fortifications of Portsmouth harbor," 
The felony charge against Helm was 
not substantiated. Bail was refused. 

Count Tolstoi, who was informed 
that it was proposed to award to him 
the Nobel Peace Prize, refused to re- 
ceive it and recommended that it be 
given to the religious sect known as 
the Doukhobors, who are the most 
pronounced adversaries of war. 

The cholera now has a firm hold 
in Constantinople, with an average of 
a dozen new cases a day. In Trebi- 
zond the situation is more serious. 
The disease has spread so rapidly 
that the people are panic-stricken and 
are taking refuge in the hills. 

The regulations adopted for the 
government of Corea provide for a 
Governor-General, invested with au- 
thority to make ordinances, subject to 
the approval of the Emperor of Jap- 
an. A Premier and a Privy Coun- 
cilor to administer affairs will be ap- 
pointed. 

The cholera epidemic has taken a 
strong hold in Amur province. Si- 
beria, twenty-six cases,* with twelve 
deaths, being reported in the week 
ending September 23. On the whole, 
however, the situation is improving. 
The total made up at the .sanitary 
bureau shows 198.246 cases and 92,- 
329 deaths since the outbreak of the 
epidemic. 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 




Established 1888. 

Consular Building, Corner Waahlngton and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

Oldest School on Pacific Coast. Largest 
and best equipped private Nautical School In 
the United States. Graduates prepared for the 
.\merican and British Merchant Marine exam- 
inations. Warrant offlcers of the United States 
Navy prepared for examination for commis- 
sion officers. Special course for cadets enter- 
ing the United States Naval Academy. 

Personal instruction by Captain Henry Tay- 
lor, M, A., Compass Adjuster, Certified In- 
structor, Passed Master, Proctor in Admiralty, 
Counselor at Law and competent to give legal 
advice on all matters, including Naturalization. 

WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHOLESALE Sole Agents for RETAIL 

The McCormack System of Fine Tailoring 

McCORMACR BROS. 

Importers, Jobbers and Retailers 

MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, CAPS, BOOTS AND SHOES 
TRUNKS, VALISES AND NOTIONS 



812-814 FIRST AVENUE, Opp. Colman Block 



SEATTLE, Wash. 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



NEVER HAD A FAILURE 



11 COLMAN DOCK 



SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opp. Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



lleailquartPrs For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS. HATS AND SHOES 



\i 



WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 

220 and 222 First Avenue, South 
Branch Store - - 1335 Third Avenue 

SliATTLK, \V.\.SH, 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St., 

Seattle, Wash. 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

Undertakers 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 




SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Candidates for Mas- 
ters' and Mates' Ocean 
or Coast Licenses of 
all Grades are In- 
structed In the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
Navigation in all Its 
Branches, and in the 
Arithmetic of Navi- 
gation ill 11 >,iear and Intelligent Manner 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical ("College- 
Ocean Steamship Master, Unlimited: 
Puget Sound and Alaska Pilot; Author of 
"Self Instructor in Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practice, etc. 

MARITIME BLDG. (Fifth Floor), 
911 Western Avenue. 
Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of Practical Compass Adjustment " 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squire-Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Jose Alonzo and Cha.s. Domingo, 
marine firemen, and Antoine Silvia 
and Jose Requeiva, oilers, are re- 
quested to leave addresses with E, A. 
Erickson, 1st Patrolman, care of 
Sailors' Union. 

Any one knowing whereabouts of 
Harry Fields, sometimes called Mar- 
tin Smith, kindly report to F. Ascher, 
1817 Chapin street, Alameda, Cal. 

P. J. Bertlesen, winchman; J. Berg, 
V. Erickson, Olaf Kjellman, L. Linde- 
beck, Theadore Yunther and M. C. 
Rasmussen, seamen; F. H. Sullivan, 
steward; W. Kidd, cook; J. Cote and 
Ed. McNellis, firemen, and G. Lina- 
nans, galleyman, on the steam- 
schooner Washington at the time she 
picked up the Minnie E. Kelton. 
Please call on F. R. Wall, 1209 Mer- 
chants' Exchange. 



My work Is my best advertisement. 

W. H. MIDDLETON 
TAILOR 

A. H. ANDERSON, CUTTER 

Custom Tailors' Union Label In every 

Garment. 

519 THIRD AVENUE 

Three Doors South of James, SEATTLE. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postoflice, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mail forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
liold mail until arrival. 

Albrigtsen, G. J. Kalnow, A. 

Allen, J. Keenan, Fred 
Anderson, Einor ChrKenny, J. 
Anderson, John -1534Kiesow, P. 

Anderson, Alf. Kronsbrand, H. O. 

Andersen, Andrew Larsen, Claus 

Apps, P. Latz, Konstanz 

Armstrong, W. H. Lewis, Geo. H. 

Bausman, E. -1511 Lindegard, J. 

Benson, F. -1765 Lundberg, C. 
Berg, Edmund -1312Lunder, Bjorn 

Berge, Johan Lundgren, C. J. 

Berenken, A. Lul, Theo. 

Bianca, F. -1661 Mattson, E. M. 

Botherel, A. Martin, Chr. 

Brynmg. Walter McAdam, J. 

Brown, I. Miller, James 

Carlson, Harold Mikkelson, M. -158-1 

Carlson, G. -622 Morgan, Ed. 

Chnstensen, Peter Moore, J. M. 
Christotfersen, Her-Monson, Andrew 

^ '°f , Nielsen, N. A. -909 

Chnstensen, Otto Nielsen, Martin 

-■^rl^ Nielsen, M. A. 

Davidson, Jacob Nobereit, Gustaf 

Doll, Herman Nord, G. E. C. 

Dxeyer, Herman Olsen, Oscar, -1062 

Elfstrom, A. Olsen, S. 

Brikson. Allan Qlsen, Gabriel 

Eskola, Henry Olsen, Valdimar 

Fernandoez, A. Olsen, B. -597 

Franzeli, A. Olsson, John H. 

Frivald, John Olsen. Hans 

Fredrickson, B. Omundson, Harry . 

Frose, Ellas Paterson, Robert 

German. R. B. Pedersen, Olaf 

Grandal, Harry Pederson, A. -1173 

Gronburg. Theodor Peterson, A. -1223 

Gustav, John Petterson, C. W 

Hansen, John P. Penningrud, Ludon 

Haakonsen, H. Porje, Anton 

Hass, Wilhelm Randle, Dave 

Hansen, Hans Chr. Ruzner, Ernest 

Hansen, Andrew Rickardson, Adam 

Harjes, H. -1940 Rimmer, J. 

Ha tness, M. Schmidt, Alfred 

Hellisen, H. Selander, John 

Henriksen, Adolf Shane J 

Hernonen H. ShalloW, J. 

Hilhg, Alb. Smith, Max 

Ho mes, Paddy Speller, Harry 

Holmes, Gus Svensson, A. -1691 

Jensen, Hans Swenson. L. G 
Johansen, C. M.-1593Tallopon, A. -721 

Johansen, Olaf K. Williamson, A. 

Johnson, Bernard Zagan, J 

Johnson. Chali Zeisler, A. 

Johnsen, C. J. Zima, W 
Jorgenson, J. 



1<:UKEKA, CAl^. 



The Pride O'Humbolilt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Be«r 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO., 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY &. YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers In Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outside of Union Office 

Seattle, Wash. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



HERMAN SCHULZE. 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F. 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 



Anders Peter Andersen, a native of 
Denmark (Bogo), aged about 42, is 
inquired for by his sister. Address 
Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart 
street. 

Wilhelm Mahsing, last heard of as 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is inquired 
for by his brother, John Mahsing, 
now sailing out of New Orleans. Ad- 
dress, Marine Firemen's Union, 514 
Dumaine St., New Orleans, La. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SMORB 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union -made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT 


BROS. 


JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 


WATCHES AND 
Cor. of HERON 

ABERDEEN, 


JEWELRY 
<t G STS. 

WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, 
Groceries and Notions. 
We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 
320 S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service. 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 
Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS. 

PORT TOWNSEND, 'wASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively In Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 

around the corner from the Union OfBce. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(fiicofporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. B. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf, 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing Is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



C. J. SWANSON 

Clothier and Furnisher for 
Gentlemen 

Up-to-date Suits Made to Order 

Hats, Caps, Shoes, Oilskins and 

Rubberboots 

Bedding, Blankets and Pillows 

Uniform gold braids and gold wreaths 

of all descriptions 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Washington 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phone Douglas 1082 

Home Phone C-3486 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. 8. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hnts, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE TACOMA, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 



OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

H. I. MALLEK 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Men's Outfitters, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, Flannel Shirts, 
Quilts, Blankets, and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road" and "Can't Bust 'Em" Overalls, 75c; Hickory Shirts, 50c. 
Everything Union made. 

I ■will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 

Remember the place, one block north of Union Hall, 2320 N. 30th St., Old Town. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks. Valises, etc. 
ROSENSTEIN BROS. 
23 N. Third Street, near Burnslde 

Portland, Oregon. 



WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441 
Residence Phone Tabor 3 
I give you a Claim Check for your bag- 
gage at home. Give me your work 
or we botli lose money. 
Office: 
23 UNION AVENUE - ■ Portland, Ore. 



CJBfrBusitn 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE SCANDINAVIAN STORE 

717 Pacific Ave. Near City Hall 

B. OLSON, Proprietor. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

John Ferdinand Petterson Franken, 
a native of Finland, is inquired for. 
Address Coast Seamen's Journal. 





UNION MADE CLOTHING 

from our factory to 

your back 

$15.00 Suits For Men 

(Guaranteed in every detail) 

S. N. WOOD & CO. 

Market and Fourth Sts., 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Washington and 11th Sts., 

Oakland, Cal. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Seamen 
Win Promotion 

Promotion conies <iuic kist to the 
man who can do things — the man 
with practical knowledge at liis 
finger ends. Seamen, Apprentices, 
Petty Officers, Commissioned Offi- 
cers in the Merchant or Naval 
Service, will find just the informa- 
tion they want when they want it 
in the Mariners' Handbook of the 
International Correspondence 
Schools. Answers instantly and accu- 
rately all questions on Navigation, 
U. S. Navy, Piloting, Ship Building, 
Speed, Tonnage, Ropes, Wind and 
Weather, Signals, etc. Solves every 
nautical problem from rope splicing 
up. A 324 page, well illustrated 
book, indexed for instant reference 
and bound for hard and longsei vice. 
Having it increases your chance for 
promotion. Although worth many 
dollars, it is offered for 

50 Cents 

and this Coupon 



International Textbook Company 

Box No. 898-P, Scranton, Pa. 

1 enclose 50 cents which witli this 
coupon entitles me to one copy of 
your Mariners' Handbook. 



Name 

Street and No. 
City 



State 




The population of Waterloo, Iowa, 
is 26,693, an increase of 14,113, or 112.2 
per cent, as compared with 12,580 in 
1900. 

The population of Wilkesbarrc, Pa., 
is 67,705, an increase of 15,384, or 29.7 
per cent, as compared with 51,721 in 
1900. 

John \. Dix of Washington coun- 
ty, N. Y., was nominated as candi- 
date for Governor on the Democratic 
ticket on September 30. 

The population of Atlantic City, N. 
J., is 44,461, an increase of 16,623, or 
59.7 per cent, as compared with 27,838 
in 1900. 

The population of Watertown, N. 
Y., is 26,730, an increase of 5034, or 
23.2 per cent, as compared with 21,696 
in 1900. 

The population of .Springfield, 111., is 
51,678, an increase of 17,519, or 51.3 
per cent, as compared with 34,159 in 
1900. 

The office of the Los Angeles (Cal.) 
Times was destroyed by explosion 
and fire on October 1. It is believed 
that several persons were killed. 

The New Orleans Mint has been 
closed by order of Secretary Mac- 
Veagh of the Treasury Departinent, 
due to lack of gold for coining pur- 
poses. 

Acting Mayor Mitchell, of New 
York City, has recommended that Po- 
lice Commissioner Baker be removed 
on the ground of unfitness in permit- 
ting gambling to flourish in the city. 

The lynching of two men of Italian 
birth at Tampa, Fla., on September 
20 is being investigated by the diplo- 
matic and consular representatives of 
the Italian Government in the United 
States. 

Resolutions adopted by the Irriga- 
tion Congress at Pueblo, Col., on 
September 30 declare that "Federal 
control is essential to equitable dis- 
tribution and utilization of water of 
interstate streams." 

Damage caused by a fire which 
swept the Times-Democrat building 
at New Orleans on September 30 was 
not as large as at first believed. It is 
said that the loss will not exceed 
$50,000. 

Canada probably within the next 
few days will communicate with 
Washington as to the proposed open- 
ing of negotiations looking to recip- 
rocity arrangeinents between the two 
coinitrics. 

The so-called "Brick Trust" was in- 
dicted by the l<\'(leral Grand Jury at 
Chicago on September 14, charged 
with violation of the Sherman Anti- 
Trust law. Four individuals and three 
ci)ni])anies are named. 

Forty-two persons were killed and 
seven were seriously injured in a 
Iiead-on collision between two trac- 
tion cars on the Fort Wayne-Bluflfton 
division of the I-'ort Wayne and Wa- 
bash Valley line on September 21. 

l'"or the first time in fifty years 
the doors of the gambling-houses in 
Carson City, Nev., have been barred 
by the law. Under the recent action 
'if the Legislature of Nevada, gamb- 
ling in that State has been prohibited. 

It was announced on .September 27 
that probably President Taft would 
issue an order placing 7622 assistant 
postmasters under the protection of 
the civil service law and taking them 
cntinly out of politics. It was said, 
also, that the President would recom- 
mend to Congress that the 7198 sec- 
ond and third class postmasters be 
placed under civil service rules. 



n 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The strike of teamsters at Port- 
land, Or., was declared off on Sep- 
tember 28 under the terms of an 
agreement reached witli the em- 
ployers. 

A lockout of 10,000 bricklayers for 
alleged violations of their agreement 
in ordering strikes against a member 
of a builders' association went into 
effect at New York on September 
27. 

The California State Building 
Trades Council has offered a re- 
ward of $7,500 for the arrest and con- 
viction of the persons responsible for 
the destruction of the Times building 
at Los Angeles. 

A labor parade arranged to be held 
in Los Angeles on October 3, in con- 
nection with the convention of the 
California State Federation of Labor, 
was called off on account of tlie ex- 
plosion in the Times building. 

It is reported from Spokane, Wash.. 
that a movement whereby all com- 
mercial telegraphers in the United 
States shall make a concerted de- 
mand for increased wages on .\pril 
1, 1911, has been started. 

The eleventh annual convention of 
the California State Federation of 
Labor opened at Los Angeles on 
October 3. The membership and at- 
tendance was the largest in the his- 
tory of the Federation. 

It is believ^ that the discovery of 
the "hookworm" disease among tlie 
Hindoo immigrants at Angel Island, 
Cal., will result in important de- 
velopments in stopping the influx of 
Hindoos at San Francisco, Cal. 

An agreement was reached at 
Houston, Texas, on September 26, 
between officials of the Southern Pa- 
cific Railroad and representatives of 
the car-repairing department of the 
road, providing for an increase in 
wages. 

Petitions asking Governor Harmon 
of Ohio to suspend Mayor Marshall 
of Columbus on charges of gross mis- 
conduct in office, growing out of his 
management of the car strike situa- 
tion, were formally filed on Septerrf- 
ber 27. 

Conceding the "Closed Shop," the 
Contractors' Association of Stockton, 
Cal., has passed up its differences 
with the Carpenters' Union to an 
arbitration committee. The ques- 
tion of wages had already been 
agreed upon. 

Immigration will be the political 
issue on which the Republican and 
Democratic parties of Hawaii will 
fight their principal battle this year. 
The Republicans stand for the pres- 
ent policy of importing labor, and 
the Democrats oppose that policy. 

At the present rate of increase of 
Hindoo immigration it is predicted 
that more than 5000 natives of India 
will arrive in the United States in the 
coming year. For the last few 
months Hindoos have been coming in 
at San Francisco at the rate of over 
300 a month. 

Latest New Zealand returns show 
that on December 31. 1909, there 
were in the Dominion 308 unions of 
workers, with a total 'of 54,519 mem- 
bers. The return does not include 
the Miners' Federation, not register- 
ed under the Act, with a membership 
of over 50CO. There are also half a 
dozen of other small unions unac- 
counted for, which would give New 
Zealand approximately a total of 60,- 
000 trade-union members. 



San Francisco Letter List, 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for throe 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Aalesund, Carl O. 
Abraliamsen, -1263 
Adamsson, John 
Adamson, O. 
Airo, Oskar 
Aksulsen, Aksel 
Aibeitsi-n, Hans Clir. 
Albieclit, Krail 
Andersen, -1310 
Andersen, Albin 
Andersen. Carl 
Andersen, Carl Emil 
Andersen, Hans K. 
Andersen, J. O. 
Andersen, -1620 
Andersen, A., -1653 
Bach, E. E. 
Baker, C. W. 
Barney, Chas. 
Bartel, L. 
Barwa, David 
Bazer, Gorla 
Beck, Jolin A. 
Belirens, Utto 
Bende, Adolf 
Bendixcn, Nic 
Berg, Edmund 
Berg. Mickel 
Bergstroni. Axel 
Bernard, S. 
Bernisen. EUert 
Birdie, W. G. 
Bjorklund, Erik 
Black. Victor 
Hlair, Francis 
Carlsen, Jakob 
Carlson, iiarry 
Carlson, Harvey 
Carlson, Julius 
Carlson, Kicliard 
Carlstrom, A. 
Cassen, Harry 
Ceelan, John 
Ceclay, Tom A. 
Chaler, B. 
Chandler, P. L. 
Chevalier, Vincent 
Dahlman, Axel 
Ualilstrom, -749 
Uauingoid. Ernest 
Day, Harry E. 
De Haan, G. A. 
L'inuiierninks, F. 
Doense, J. 
Egenas, Nels 
Kgsellioff. Fred 
Eklund. David 
Eliasen. J. A. 
Ellis, Jack 
Kllingsen, Edward 
Ellingseii. J. W. 
i'jionen, M. H. 
Fagerholin. Carl 
Faulkner, John E. 
Feeley, Tom 
Felix, Hans 
Fischer, Peter 
Foley, J. J. 
Forvik, Olaf 
Foss, Laurlts 
Gasman, Geo. A. 
German. R. B. 
Gibbs. Harry 
Gilliolm, Allen 
Godorog, Vasale 
Gonzalez, J. 
Graiigaard, I.,. 
Gravier, Eugene 
Green. William 
Gronman, -456 
Grunbel. Gustav 
Grunwald, Alfons 
Haarancn, Hjalmar 
Haering, Walter 
Hagen, Carl L. 
Hageli, Torvald 
Halvorsen, Anton 
Halvorsen, Severln 
Hammlnargren 
Hannus, A. 
Hansen, H. O. 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, C. O. 
Hansen. -2085 
Hansen, Adolph 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, Ragnvald 
Hansen, -2060 
Hansen, Einar A. 
Hansen, Emanuel 
Hansen, Henry E. 
Hansen, H. P. 
Hansen, H. M. 
Hansen, H. J. 
Hannus, A. 
lacksson, Karl 
Idog, Chas. 
Ingerbertsen, O. E. 
Jaeobsen, Die 
Jaeobsen, J. 
Jakobsen, J. E. 
Jaekobson, Emll 
Jamleson, J. E. 
Janscheritz. John 
Jensen, -2014 
Jensen, I. M. 
Jensen, Oscar 
Jensen. M. C. 
Jensen. N. O. 
Jensen, A. 
Jensen. Olof Nils 
Jensen, -I'JS" 
Jespersen. M.trtln 
Johansen, Axel 
Johansen. Chas. 
Joluinnsen, Peter 
Johansen, Alex 
Kallas, Aug. 
Karlsen, John A. 
Karlsson, Josef 
Karlsson, R. 
Karlsson. Gus. Robt. 
K.arlsson, Gust, 
Kaspersen, O. Chr. 
Kaus, I-. 
Kavanagh, Jas, 
Kelly. ,iolin 
Kerlean, Alex 
Kibi. John 
Kiel. P. 
Kiesel. A. C. 
Kinerman, Chas. 
Klssor 



Andersen, Ned. 
Andersen, Ole 
Anderson, -822 
Anderson, Karl 
Anderson, Sven 
Andersson, Karl 
Andersson, Aug. 
Andreasen, Mogens 
Anlonsen, Karl 
Anzine, Giuseppe 
Appelgren, John 
Arenius, Geo. 
Arnesen, Isak 
Arnstrom. Julius 
Asp, Gustaf 
Aylward, James 
Blank, Geo. 
Blecha, Alf. 
Bliesath, Max 
Bloinquist, Chas. 
Boers, M. 
Boman, W. 
Boquist, Chas. 
Brams, C. S. 
Bray, J. K. 
Bregler, Fred. 
Broden, Julius 
Brox, Henrik 
]?ruce. Otto 
Brunwald, H. 
Bryde, C. M. 
Buaas, Thos. 
Burke, James 
Burr, E. C. 

Christensen. E. H. 
Christcnsen, J. J. 
Christensen. M. H. 
Chrlstoftersen. B. 
ChristofCerson, Alf. 
Clark, James 
Clausen, Elias 
Cleissman. Frank 
Conrad, Fritz 
Cooley, Howard 
Croscliet, D. 
Cutler, Wm. 
Doherty, Bob 
Dracar, Edgardo 
Drausman, Hans 
Dreger. Jack 
Dryger, Max 
Duff, Wm. 

Engebretsen, -125 
Eriksen, Edw. 
Eriksen, Ole 
Eriksson. Conrad 
Ericksson, Chas. 
Evans, E. 
Evanger, Nils 

Foyn. Sam 
Frank, Bernard 
Frankovic. A. 
Frandsen, Niels 
Fraiisson. Frank G. 
Frivald, John 
Furesson, Theo. 

Guerrero, Mrs. 
Guldberg, Randolt 
Gullaksen, Hans 
Gunn, W. D. 
Gundersen, -S99 
Gundersen, -785 
Gusjaas, Oskar 
Gustave, Garnier 
Gustafson, Frank 
Gustman, C. 
Gustafson, G. 
Gustafson. Oscar 
Harlow, H. A. 
Haug, Hans H. 
Hedinskoy, J. 
Hedvall. A. 
Heine, Mr. 
Helmros, G. 
Hengst, Otto 
Hennlng, August 
Henry. Harry 
Herdon, E. H. 
Heyne, Herman 
Heyne, H. 
Hillelam. A. 
Hinke, E. 
Iloffs. Henry 
Hofgaard. H. 
HoRstedt, Charlie 
Hogstrom, Axel 
Holmberg. Olaf 
Holm, Johan 
Holstein. R. 
Hoye, Haakon 
Hunt, Gus 
Irwlns, Robert 
Isaksen, Gunnar 

Johansen, A. F. 
.lohanspn, Mathias 
Johansson, Carl 
Johansson, John 
.Tohansson, E. R. 
Johannesen, Arthur 
Johannsson, -2071 
.lohnsen. Oscar 
Johnsson. Roy W. 
Johnsson, J. R. 
.Johnston, J. A. 
Johnson, C. R. 
Johnson, Jas. K. 
.lohnson. Emile 
Johnson, Alf. 
Johnson, -1597 
Johndahl, H. 
Jordfald. Theo. 
Jorgensen, Wm. 
Kjellgren. L. A. 
Knieling. John 
Knopf, Louis 
Knudsen. Lars 
Kolilmeister, Otto 
Kolter, L. 
Koop, F. D. 
Kotserubie, Anton 
Krapp. E. 
Kristoffersen, Alf. 
Krlstophersen, Jacob 
Krogstad, H. E. 
Kuhlman. Louis 
Kukuhskin, M. 
Kuhne. Karl 



I^aekey, C. H. 

Lahr, Otto 

Lange, P, H. 

Lankvlst, John 

Larsen, Laurlls P. 

Larsen, Martin 

Larsen, Lars -1290 

Larsen, Oscar 

I.,arsen, Soren 

Larson, Lars M. 

L,aws, J. B. 

Le Bloa. Sylvain 

Lehto. Emil 

Le Maire 

Leroen, Lars 

Lersten, J. O. 

Madsen, Th. 

Malmberg, Elis 

Mamers. Chas. 

Mansfield, Jack 

Martens, Hans 

Martin, H. 

Masterman, E. 

Mathisen, Herman 

Matre. Nels J. 

Matson. -1471 

Matthews, F. 

Matteson, J. A. 

Mattson, John M. 

MoAvay, J. A. 

McLouglin, M. 

McBratney, Hugh 

Nanjack, G. 

Nelson, Chas. M. 

Nelson, F. 

Nelson, Martin 

Nelson, John 

Nerbrugge, D. 

Newman, J. 

Niek, Peter 

Nielsen, N. C. 

Odland, B. B. 

Ohls. Johan 

Oistad, Hans 

Olafson. M. 

Olander, Karl 

Olmann, P. 

Olsen, -1112 

Olsen, Ole, Chr. 

Olsen, Jens 

Olsen, Chas. 

Olsen, -995 

Olsen, Hans J. 

Olsen, -533 

Olsen, Nils 

Palmroth, J. 

Paulson, A. 

Pearson, W. H. 

Pearson. Bernard 

Pearsson. John L. 

I'edersen, Karl 

Pedersen, .Johan 

I'edersen. Julius 

Pedersen, Hennlng 

Pemherton. Dave 

Petersen, H. C 

Petersen, Carl 

Raniberg. Barney 

Kanak, Louis 

Rasnuissen. Emil 

Ravall, J. E. 

Reay, Steve 

Reiner, Karl 

Reinhold. Ernst 

Rintzo, Jolm 

Saarin, John 

Saivesen. Fred 

Sanisig, Carl 

Sander, -1068 

Sanne, Rudolf 

Sandstrom, Ivar 

Sandstrom, O. H. 

S.iul. 'Ih. A. 

Sehager, E. L. 

Selienberg, C. 

Schniehl, Jas. P. 

Sehlachte, Alfred 

Schevig, A. B. 

Schmalkuche. Fritz Stangeland, P. E. 



Lewald. H. A. 
Lind, Gus. 
Lindekrantz, F. 
Lindgren, Gustaf 
Lindberg, Ole 
l.indebach, L. 
Lindskog, Thor. O. 
Lotland, -2121 
Louis. Martin 
Luckman, E, 
Lude. Thorwald 
Lundgren, Hugo 
I..undqvlst, Oscar 
Lundsberry. R. 
Lynch, -1586 

McMahon, -1887 
Menz, Paul E. 
Merken, Christ 
Meyer, Frank 
Meyer, Raymond 
Mikkelsen, Axel 
Mllas, Peter 
Miller. J. B. 
Mitcliel. Mex 
Moe. John M. 
Moren, E. H. 
Morken. J. L. 
Morrison, Donald 
Morse, E. G. 
Mullen, Joseph 
Murphy, -1916 
Niel-sen, -909 
Nielsen, H. J. 
Nielsen, -1037 
Niit. P. 

Nilson. Edward 
Nord, G. E. 
Nordling. Sven 
Nylund, Hans J. 

Olsen, Olaf D. 
Olsen, Otto 
Olsen, Paulus 
Olsen, Peter E. 
Olsen, Olaf S. 
Olsen, W. 
Olson, Hjalmar 
Olsson, -705 
Olsson, Ernest 
Osse, H. 

Oterbeck, Hans H. 
Ottenhaiisen, Carl 
Ouchterlony. Fred 
Owen. Fred 
Peterson. Frank V. 
Petrow, F. 
Petterson, Chas. 
Petter.son, -1062 
Petterson, John B. 
Pierson. Andrew 
Plaskette, Mike 
I^lottner, Alfred 
Post. Albert 
Prendel, L. 
Prenfs, F. 
Prescott, Richard 
Robeck, E. 
Robinet, Geo. 
Rosenwald. Isak 
Ross, Rudolf 
Ross, Wm. 
Rudberg. Chas. 
Runak. Hans 
Russell, Wm. 
Sjoblani, Karl A. 
Skjellerup, A. 
Skotlieim. Sigurd 
Smith, Henry 
Smith, Jos. P. 
Soderlund, Anton 
Soetveit, G, 
Soderling, Axel 
Sonne, A. J. -2213 
Sorensen, -1664 
Sorensen, -1492 
Soto. Santos 
Stange, Anton 



Schmidt, Hans 
Scholtens. Ben 
Sehott, H. 
Schultman, J. H. 
Schultman, Johan 
Schulz, Ernst 
Schelenz, Hanf 
Schnell, Henry 
Schultz, Albert 
Sclander. Gus. 
Scott, E. G. 
Seagreen, John 
Seberg, C. 
Schellenberg, H. 
Seiger, Joe 
Selander. Gus. 
Sharp, Fred 
Siem, C. 
Sinyard, W. 
Sjoberg, Johan 
Tancer, Chas. 
Taylor. Wm. H. 
Teigland, Carl 
Tergesen, Tom 



Sterro, J. E. 
Stein, John 
Stewart, J. L. 
Stolzer, Aug. 
Stolt, A. J. 
Strand. Charley 
Strand, Olaf 
Stenfoes. G. 
Strom, C. 
Sunde Albert 
Sund. Alex 
Suominen, O. 
Svendsen, C. J. 
Svenson, Algol 
Sweeney, John 
Swenson, Edwin 
Swanson, Ims. 
Swanson, Martin 
Swanson, -2184 

Tipp, Jos. 
Tonning. Christ 
Torolk, Olaf 
Torbjornsen, O. 



Terwedow, Richard Torkildscn, Marins 



Thilo, Peder 

Thompson, Ch. 

Thomassen, Paul 

Thorsen. Otto E. 

Thureson, Arthur 

Vana. Olaf O. 

Vejvado, Frank 

Verbruzze, L. 

Vesta, Tom 

Vlck. J. M. 

Wahlberg, Rudolph Weyer, Paul 



Tornquist. S. 
Tramm, Hans 
Trentani, Louis 
T«cheekar, F. 
Tuft. Edw. 
Vlster, Julius 
Von Vlies, P. 
Von Fyren, G. P. 
VucJc, V. 



Whalstedt, Alb. 
Wiad, H. I. 
Wlborg, John 
Wlkstrom, Wm. 
Willponen, Edw. 
Winkel, August 
Wlsto, Julius 
Witol, H. 
Wolens, J. 
Zimmerling, F. 



Christansen, N. 
Damlano, Alex. 
Dyeness, L. E. 
Eckert. W. F. 
Gustafson, K. O. 
Hansen, -1229 
Hardmere, C. 
Hengst. Otto 
Jensen, -1342 
Jensen, -2014 
Johansen, Nlel -2071 
Johanson, -1677 
Johannessen, -1863 
Kaald, John 
KIrst. Hans 
Larsen. Anton 
I.,ackey, C. 
Larsen, I>ars, -1290 
Larson, G. A. 
Lewis, H. 
Plhplck, K. 
Lundman, Carl 



Martin, H. 
Martens, Hans 
Matisen, Nils 
Mattler, Franz 
Olsen, G. 
Pedersen. Chas. 
Pedersen, Karl 
Petersen, N. -782 
Peterson, Hennlng 
Purdy, W. G. 
Rignell, Eric 
Russell, W. 
Sansing, Carl 
Sehager, E. L. 
Siegurd, J. I. 
Stensland, Paul 
Strand, -1786 
Swanson, Martin, 

-2184 
Thompson, A. 
Torgersen, Kaspar 
Winclad, M. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Andreasen, O. L. 
Aken, Emil 
Asker, John 
Andersen, Oluf 
Andersen, J. -934 
Andersen, Sam 
Adman, O, 
Buth, Siegfried 
Brander, Wm. 
Boy, George 
Brandt, Nils 
Bensen, John 
Collins, F. 
Cooley, Howard 
Castel, J. 
Calson, Carl 
Comstock, Howard 
Cuttler, Wm. 
Davis, John 
Dirks, George 
De Cantes, M. 
Fisko, Oluf 
Faccet, Sam 
Gras, Charles 
Graves, Sam 
Granberg, Gus S. 
Hubner, H. 
Hall, Leonard 
Holmstrom, C. A. 
Holm, Carl 
Hartman, Geo. 
Hansen, Ole 
Hanson, Henry 
Houser, Cliarlie 
Jolinson, Andrew 
Jaeobsen, G. -1092 
Isacson, Ch., -140 
Joiianson, Hjalmar 
Jarf, Krlstian 
Jorgensen, Charles 
Johnson, C. -1345 
Jensen, Ingvalt, M. 
Joliannessen, Josef 
Johanson, Fr. -2019 
Johanson, Teodor 
Johnson, R. W. 
Johnson, Carl, -1585 
Johnson, Julius 
Johansen, Herluf C. 
Jonasson Carl Axel 
Johnson, Frank 
Kose, Arniin 
Karlson, Edvard 
Krumblegel, Arthur 
Kuiime, Wm. 
KImeral, Herman 
Kielman, Joe 
Kofter, Mark 
Klolen. Karl 
Jjundberg, C, 
Lindblom, Ernst 
Larsen, George 



Lindholm, Chas. 
Lingberg, Oscar 
Larson, M. A. 
Lohtonen, John 
Lengwems, U. L. 
Lorentzen, Ernest 
Linquist, Gust 
Lorln, Martin 
Lind, Gust 
Miller, Otto 
Mattson, Karl 
Mattson, J. 
Neilson. A. O. 
Nurmi, Victor 
Nilson, Alfred 
Olsen, Ernest 
Olsen, E. A. 
Olsen, Carl 
Olsson, Carl G. -1101 
Olsen, Oswald, -1059 
Oscar, Carl 
Orten, Sigurd 
Olson, Wilhelm 
Olsen, John 
Olsen, Valler 
Olsen, Olaf O. 
Pedersen, Kristian 
Petersen, Oscar 
Poison, C. -641 
Pearson, Julius F. 
Pettersen, Wilhelm 
Pedersen, Hans Chr. 
Petersen, Oscar Fr. 
Petersen, A. G. -2404 
Prondberg, G. -1306 
Peratis, John 
Roswell, Gus. 
Rost, K. G. 
Rasmussen, N. G., 

-485 
Swanson, Martin 
Skoman, Chas. 
Sverstrup, E. F. 
Sparre. Don 
Schulter, Paul 
Schelenz, Karl 
Steversen. Charles 
Stevens, Scott R. 
Sorensen, Karl 
Svenson, Bernard 
Siegurd, Jushus T. 
Smith, J. V. 
Speckman, Max 
Thompson, Chas. 
Thorsen, Jens 
Uolby, Harold 
Wishaar, E. B. 
Westnas, Ivar 
Wuorio, J. 
Veaal, G. 
Winters, C. 



Eureka, CaL, Letter List. 



Wakroom. J. 
Wannkvist, E. 
Ward. H. 
Welsen, J. 
Welure, -1064 
Wenneck, A. 
Werner, Paul 
Westman, A, 
Wever, Carl 
Zagen, Geo. 
Zeisig, Johannes 

PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 

Andersen, -1609 Behrentz, C. 

Anderson. Victor Brandsten, Ernest 
Andreasen, Hans Christensen, Chris- 
Arrhenins, Geo. ten 



Andersen, John 
Anderson, Olof 
Anderson, S. 
Armmi, Walter 
Blunt, H. 
Bostrom, C. 
Brown, C. L. 
Bryan, G. F. 
Christensen, Harvy 
Conaughton, H. 
Ekwall, G. A. 
Fors. Alfred 
Fraberg, Enock 
Goevyette, Joseph 
Grant, John 
Gunther, Theo, 
Gustafson, Edvard 
Horlin. Ernest 
Hollins, Frank 
Isaacson, Gustav 
Ivars, Carl 
Johanesen, Arthur 
Johnsen. J., -25 
Johnston, R. 
Karlson, Anders E. 
Klauson, Axel. 
J^ombar, Ermlno 
Lorensen. Org. C. 
Michaelsen, Johanes 



Michell Agojtino 
Niccolal, Sant 
Nilsen. R. 
Nilsen, O. 
Nordblom, Ben. 
Nylund, Sven 
Olsen, Peder A. 
Olson, Bror. 
Olson, C, 
Oman, Victor 
Palomo. G. 
Pedersen, Martin 
Pedersen, Paul 
Pedersen, Peter 
Petterson. Aaskar 
Penney, Math. 
Salmlnen, K. W. 
Selander. Gustaf 
Shuils, Christ. 
Sjellman, Jonas 
Stienen, J. C. 
Svendsen, Olof 
Teigland, G, 
Thoresen, Petter 
Kalkman, Otto 
Walbreth, Carl 
Wilsonn, John 
Yannle, C. 
Yulmky. Wm. 



Pt. Townsend Letter List. 



Bianea, F. 
Carsson, -1044 
Carlsen. H. G. 
Harmening. Fritz 
Joluisen, Emil 



Liesmann, Fred 
Hosbei'k, Gustav 
Schmidt. A.. -938 
Simensen, Simon 
Tramm, Hans 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Alfred J. 

Bowers, Gust. 

Collins, B. F. 

Dave.v, Chas. 

Eishel. Erich, -740 
! Fors, Alfred 
I Hansen, Chas. 
I Haug, Hans H. 

KImeral. Herman 

Lewis, J. W. 
I I,owe, John A. 
] Moorten, Louis 
I Nelson. Fred 



Nelson. Nels B. 
Ness, John 
Olsen. Chas. 
Petterson, Knut L. 
Pettersen, Johan 
Reay. L. A. 
Renter. Ernest 
Robsham, Jens W. 
Lolberg, B. P. 
Thore. B. E. 
TTIlman, Gustaf 
Vongehr, Edward 
Zelig, Gustav 



THE HARBOR HOTEL 

Formerly ■•■i-h,> Mohawk" 

132 EAST STREET 

Opposite Ferry 

STEAM HEAT, HOT AND COLD 

WATER JN EVERY ROOM 



Elevator Service Free Baths 

and a Large Reading Room 

Rates: 
$2.00 PER WEEK AND UP 
35c PER DAY AND UP 



T. L. 



SELCHAU P. N. 
Proprietors 



NANSEN 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY -AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings (.THE GERMAN BANK) Commercial 

(Member of the Associatcl Saviifgs Banks 
of San Francisco.) 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital .... $ 1,200,000.00 
Capital actually paid up in cash $ 1,000,000.00 
Reserve and Contingent Funds . .t 1,55.5,093.0.5 

Deposits June 30th, 1910 40,384,727.21 

Total Assets 43,108,907.82 

Remittance may be made by draft, post office, or Wills 
Far?.) & I'o's money orders, or coin by express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 o'clock P. M.. cxctpt 
Siturlivs to 12 o'clock M. and Saturday EvcninEs from 
B.3) o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of deposits 
only. 

OFFICERS— President, N. Ohlandt; First ^'i^?-Prcs- 
idcnt, Daniel Meyer; Second Vce-President .and M najpr, 
G.wgeTournv; third Vice-President, J. AV. \aii liorg n; 
Cashier. A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier. \Ml.iam 
Herrmann; Secretary, A. H. Muller; Assistan! S'crclarxs. 
G. J. 0. Folte and Wm. D. Newhouse; Good.clhnv S, 
E.UsG-ner.il Attorneys. 

BOAIiD OF DIRECTORS-N. Ohlandf, Daniel M yrr, 
George To\irnv, J. W. Van Bergen, Ign. S.'.cinhart, I. N, 
Walter, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and \V. S. (>..nl- 
fellow. 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission Street, between 21st 
and 22nrl Sts. For receipt and payment of Deposits only. 
C. W. Rfver, Mana?pr. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH. 432 Clement Street, 
b^'wcen 5tli and 6fh Avenues. For receipt and payment 
of deposits only. W. C. Heyer, Manager. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 Folsom street, near Third street 

Over 100, all sunny rooms to let; fur- 
nished up-to-date; electric lights; run- 
ning hot and cold water; baths free. 
Rates, $1.75 to $3.00 per week; 25c to 
75c per day. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL. LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, oppo- 
site Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. 
Baths, Reading Room. Office open all 
night. Best place near waterfront. 
Investigate. 



Blue Diamond Havana Cigars are 
satisfactory because they are hand- 
made from imported Havana by com- 
petent union cigar makers — 2 for 25c 
—10c. 3 for 25c. 

THRANE BROS., Makers. 
46 East St., Under Union Headquar- 
ters and 1800 Market St. 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
109STEUARTST., SanFrancisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



THE EAGLE CIGAR STORE 

and Laundry Office 

HENRY BORNEMAN, Proprietor 

Give me a call for old time's sake 

229 EAST STREET 

Betwreen Washington and Jackson Sts. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 

We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 

Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Below 5th, near U. S. Mint and Emporium 

Phones: Kearny 1966: Home J-1966 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Nils Edmund Johansen, a native of 
Tansberg, Norway, aged about 50, last 
heard of at Melbourne, Australia, is 
inquired for by his brother. Address 
Martin Johansen, 839 Centennial ave- 
nue, Alameda, Cal. 

Information is wanted from t'le 
crews of the barkentine S. N. Castle 
and the schooner John D. Spreckels 
in regard to the seizure of these ves- 
sels in the Okhotsk Sea in 1907 by 
the Russian gunboat Madjur. Kindly 
call on Samuel Pond, First National 
Bank Building, San Francisco. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 

OF CAUFORIOA 

MARKET AND SANSOME STREETS 

Branches: 624 Van Nets Avenue and 3039 Sixteenth Street 

Authorized Capital, $3,000,000. Capital Paid In, $1,500,000. 

Accounts of Individuals, firms, corporations and societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts at the rate of 4% per annum. 
Drafts and Letters of Credit Issued, payable in all parts of the world. 
Cha«. F. Leege, Pres. W. A. Frederick, Vlce-Pres. B. Q. Tognaxzl, Manager. 

Chas. C. Moore, Vice-Pres. 

Gavin McNab, Vlce-Pres. 



SOMETHING NE"W 

THe Antidote Pipe 

A POSITIVE 

NICOTINE 
DESTROYER. 

"ANTIDOTE," 
the Catalytic Pipe, 
has Four Impor- 
tant Advantages 
which can be found 
in No Other Pipe. 

1. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" needs No 
Breaking in. Ev- 
ery smoker knows 
the terrors of the 
first few smokes in 
an ordinary Pipe. 
The First Smoke in 
an "ANTIlJOTE" 
is as sweet as 
an ordinary Pipe 
sweetened by Long 
Usage. 

2. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" can not 
burn out. The 
Catalytic lining 
protects tlie briar. 

3. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" is alw/ays 
Dry even with con- 
stant smoking. 

4. The "ANTIDOTE" scientifically destroys the .Nicotine, making it 
evaporate. A porous lining filled witli Coal Tar Particles (Platinum, etc.) is 
placed in the bowl of a briar pipe, this is called the Catalyser; the smoke 
passing over the Catalyser produces Formol. This Formol turns all tlie 
moisture and Nicotine into steam, causing It to pass off into the air and 
evaporate. 

Ail "ANTIDOTE" Pipes are hand made, of the Best French Briar. 

KASSBR BROS. 

Distributors 

19 MARKET STREET, S. E. Cor. Steuart, San Francisco, Cal. 

Pipe Repairing Our Specialty. 




SMOKERS 



See that this label (in light 
blue) appears on the box in 
which you are served. 



Issued by Autnofityof tne Cigar MsKers' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

(JhiS CnlififiS. llnt Uie Cl9»» contained inUils bw tao b«n iriads b/a fllSl-CteS VmM 

a MEMbCft OF IH[ CIGAR MAKERS 'IKtUillAriONAl. UNION of AM.'nj. in otganuJtion devoted tD tt» ad- 

tdKtmeit\ of the MOBAl.MATERtAljnd INiaiEniWI WtKARt Of fHE OWrf. Ihtmtoreoo rTOmmeiKl 

the^ Cigars to all snxAers t^FO(n^out the world 

' Ail Inlrin^tmirtti upon this Label Mil be punishsd according to law. 



F«C 
' SIMILE 



' cur Vol 



>f America. 



Label Shirts 
Label Collars 

Bell Brand Union-Made 
COLLARS in popular 
shapes at two for 25c. 
SHIRTS made right 
here in San Francisco 
by Union Labor. You 
can patronize home 
industry and Union La- 
bor. Good assortment of 
shirts at $L00 and $1.50. 

Johnston's 

Men's Furnishing Goods 

916 MARKET STREET 

Directly Opposite 5th 



BGST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

BCD SEAL CIGAB CO.. MANUPACTUfiCBS 

183 HARTFORD ST.. §. F. 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 4 Stores: 

72 MARKET STREET 

1158 MARKET STREET 

605 KEARNY STREET 

2640 MISSION STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR* PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Domestic and Naval. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Ellis Owen Pritchard, last heard 
from on the Pacific Coast four years 
ago. is inquircfl for bv his sister. Any- 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
communicate with the Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 



.\ report from Rio Janeiro states 
that the British steamer Selma, Santa 
l'"c for Venice with grain, has been 
wrecked off Cape \'x\o, Brazil. Her 
crew were rescued. 

The British steamer .'\ral)iana, 
which went ashore off Port of Spain, 
Trinidad, recently, got off the rocks 
with the assistance of the Royal Mail 
steamer Spey, after discharging her 
forward deck load. 

Between fifteen and twenty seamen 
from the battleship New Hampshire 
are believed to have been drowned on 
September 30, when a boat, taking 
between eighty and ninety men to the 
battleship, was swamped in the Hud- 
son River. 

According to a letter received at 
Christiania from Captain Roald 
.Amundsen, on board the Fram at Ma- 
deira, Amundsen has decided to pro- 
ceed on an Antarctic expedition. He 
l)romises to send details when he ar- 
rives at Punta Arenas. 

The four-masted schooner Hollis- 
wood, from Philadelphia, arrived at 
White Castle, La., recently to load 
1,000,000 feet of cypress lumber for 
delivery at New York. The White 
Castle Lumber and Shingle Company, 
Limited, is making the shipment. 

In response to a request from the 
Philadelphia Maritime Exchange the 
commandant of the Revenue-Cutter 
service at Washington dispatched the 
revenue-cutter Forward from Key 
West to the assistance of the steamer 
Evelyn, ashore at French Reef, Fla. 

The packet freighter New York, 
operated by the New York Steamship 
Company of Detroit, foundered on 
October 2 in Thunder Bay, off Point 
Aux Barques, Lake Huron. He'- 
crew were picked up in yawls by the 
steamer Mataafa, bound for Cleve- 
land. 

The work of changing the Balmoral 
Castle from a liner into a royal yacht, 
in preparation for the Duke of Con- 
naught's South .African tour, has been 
completed, and the vessel has been 
put into commission by Captain 
Wemyss. She will sail from South- 
ampton, Eng., on October 16. 

Preliminary work on the wreck of 
the Maine continues, under the direc- 
tion of Captain Ferguson of the Uni- 
ted States Engineer Corps. From the 
result of bearings already made, it 
aiJpears that the wreck has settled 
eom])arali\'ely little since the night of 
the disaster, twelve years ago. 

Tlu- I'.elf.ist (Ireland) Harbor 
I'.oard ha?, re.u-hed an agreement with 
Ilarland and Wolff with regard to the 
h.irlior improvements necessary for 
the launching next month of the 
White Star liner Olympic. The work, 
it is announced, will be pushed for- 
w.ird with all possible speed. 

The .Mexi:an Government is to 
spenrl $3,500,000 for a (luadrangular 
inner harbor seawall at (hiaymas. 
The inner h;irl)()r will be dredged and 
deepened to a uniform depth of over 
Iwtnly-six feet and suitable docks 
biiill. enabling large sea-going liners 
111 unload ;it a dock instead of two 
miles out. 

.'\ stibmerged wooden derelict, 
prob.-ibly a schooner, bottom up, was 
p;issed on September 9, in latitude 
29.58 north, longitude 74.21 west by 
the Norwegian steamship Rosario di 
Giorgio, which arrived at Philadelphia 
recently from Port .Antonio. The 
stern p.irt of the keel was about six 
feet out of water. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



Sporting Note. — "Can I get off to 
go to the ball game?'' 

"Nix," answered the head clerk. 

"Furthermore, you will have to 
work to-night. The office is going to 
play a double header to-day." — Kansa.s 
City Journal. 



Not Always True. — "A stitch in 
time save nine," repeated the student 
of old sayings. 

"It doesn't always save nine," ob- 
jected the man with a hole in his 
pocket. "I lost only $.8. 50." — Chicago 
News. 



Not Interested. — "He's a married 
man." 

"How do you know?" 

"That charming young woman over 
there didn't even look up when he 
entered the room." — Detroit Free 
Press. 



He Explained. — "What explanation 
have you," the Judge asked severely, 
"for not speaking to your wife for 
five years?" 

"Your Honor," replied the husband, 
"I didn't like to interrupt the lady." — 
Judge. 



Drawing the Line. — Bessie (whose 
teacher is a vegetarian) — Mamma, 
Miss Adair says it is wrong to kill 
the poor little spring chickens. 

Bessie's Mother — Well, it is, dear; 
none but the plump ones should be 
killed. — Chicago Tribune. 



F.xpressive Titles. — "Why do you 
call those two old nags of yours 
'Chills' and 'Fever?' " asked the sum- 
mer boarder. 

The farmer gazetl reflectively to- 
ward his swamp meadow. "It's be- 
cause they're so infernally easy to 
cotch," he replied. — Chicago News. 



A Waiting Game. — "You let two 
automobile scorchers get by without 
saying a word to 'em!" 

"Don't you worry," replied Si Sim- 
lin. "I reckon I know the constable 
business. By Icttin' a few go past I 
set a feelin' of confidence an' by an' 
by I'll get a bunch wu'th while." — 
Washington Star. 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts in tlie 
name of two individuals, for instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for, or draw against 
the account. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, near Fourth 
San Francisco 



Bagley's Navy 



Plug 



A FINE CHEW 
Give It a Trial 



UIVIOIV 




iVlADE 



THE MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK 

Chronicle Building. 
Successor to 

THE SCANDINAVIAN SAVINGS BANK 

Offers to depositors the advantage of an INCOME from money de- 
posited and the PROTECTION afforded by a NATIONAL BANK. 
Interest Paid on Term Deposits. 
Depositary for the United States. 

State of California 
City and County of San Francisco 




Ebtablished 1886 



United States 
Watch Club 

E. r. COLLINS. Manatf«r 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 



FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Rooms 9 & 10 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

W. L. Douglas Shoes 

AGENTS FOR 

STOCKTON VICUNA FLANNELS, BEST MADE 

UP-TO-DATE STYLES IN SUITS AT REASONABLE PRICES 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC 

FAIR PRICES. RELIABLE GOODS. 

50 EAST ST., and 4 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING. 




tGENT U. S. COVUNMENT CHtlTJ AND NAUTICAt PUBUCATIOIIS 
HTDOCRAPNIC AND GEDDETIC 



H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MA.R.KET STREET 

Gon of Sicranenta ui Mirkit Sts., SAN FIANCISCD. CAL 

DKALKR IN 

Watches, Chronometers, Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods, Diamonds 



MARINE ca. FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined byf Tranait Observation 

Cmronomctkr* and Skxtants Rbntkd 



J. CONEN & CO. 
Baltimore Olothing Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 

HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS. 

California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters. Boss of the Road 

Overalls, 75 cents. Union Label Lace Bacl<, 85 cent*. 

Union Label Hickory Shirts, 50 cents. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 

AGENTS FOR CLOVERLEAF RED SOLE BOOTS— GUARANTEED. 




Eyes Examined Free 



Repairing Our Specialty 



^M'^^iiji |ii| III I — 
JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 



715 MARKET STREET 
2593 MISSION STREET 



Near Call Bldg. 
Near 22nd St. 



James 3i. Sorcnsen 
^fs end Jreaa. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
The Largest Jewelry Store, with the Largest Stock at 
the Lowest Prices 

ALL WATCH REPAIRING WARRANTED FOR TWO 
YEARS 



UNITED STATES NAUTICAL COLLEGE 

CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD, F. R. G. S., Principal 

This Modern NavigaUon School has no superior In the world to-day. 
As a practical navigator ttie Principal can claim without ostentation to rank 
second to none, and has the right experience and ability to teach you up-to-date 
methods In a systematic and easy manner. You can find one or mare of our pupils 
on most any vessel sailing out of this port. ASK THEM. 

Advice on Maritime Law, Ship's Business and Naturalization FREE. 

Evenings By Appointment. 

SPECIAL COURSE IN WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY 

810 MARKET ST., 8. F. Vl»ttor« Welcome. Telapt in« Kearny 4«M 




Stove 
Club 



$2 DOWN AND THEN A 

SMALL PAYMENT EACH 

WEEK 

You soon own a fine stove, de- 
pendable and first-class in all re- 
spects. A splendid line to choose 
from — wood, coal and gas stoves 
among them. All are perfect cook- 
ers and fuel savers. Stove prices 
range from $15 to $63.50. 

The club payments are $1.00 a 
week for stoves worth $25 or less; 
$1.50 a week for $25 to $50 stoves; 
$2.00 a week for stoves costing 
over $50. 




Charles Lyons 



London 
Tailor 

719 Market St., Near 3rd 

Branch Store 

1432 Fillmore St. 



C. BREINING 

Representing Marine District 



H. SAMUEL, 

Alto known a* Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Bet. King and Berry Sts., San Franciaco 

GENTS', BOYS', AND 
YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, etc.. Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Out- 
fits a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at the 
lowest marltet price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake — Lool< for the Name 
and Number. 



WHITE PALACE GOOD- 
YEAR SHOE RE- 
PAIRING CO. 

JOE WEISS, Prop. 

56 East St., bet. Market and 

Mission, San Francisco 

Always in stock full lines 
of Union-Made and Govern- 
ment shoes, new and second- 
hand. 

Your old shoes made new. We use 
the best leather in the market. 

Half Soles, sewed 75 cts. 

Half Soles, sewed, and Heels. .. .$1.00 

Rubber Heels 50 cts. 

All Work Guaranteed! 





FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 





A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 




VOL. XXIV. No. 4. 


SAN FRANCISCO. WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 12, 1910. 


Whole No. 2090. 



THE "OPEN SHOP" CITY. 



44"VTrT"E STAND for the open shop__ and 

\/\/ free and independent workmen." 
' ' This is the text of sermons that 

are being preached all over the country to-day 
by opponents of the great organized labor move- 
ment. It is a splendid bait and many an unfor- 
tunate workman has bit hard and been hooked 
unmercifully. To be a free and independent 
workman is a laudable ambition and the term 
"open shop" gives a suggestion of something 
most desirable. 

On the Pacific Coast one city of refuge for sup- 
porters of the "open shop" has already been es- 
tablished. It is a walled city, and the "philan- 
thropists" are attempting to extend the wall until 
it encircles the whole coast. Merchants, manu- 
facturers, "captains of industry," judges, legisla- 
tors, and professional men are engaged in the at- 
tempt to build the wall. Fortunately, many of 
the workmen have had an opportunity to go into 
the city of refuge and take a look around. The 
doors have not been permitted to swing closed. 
They have been held open by the "iniquitous 
unions." 

This city of refuge is the "City of the Angels," 
Los Angeles. It is a fair city, surrounded by a 
Garden of Eden, reclaimed from the desert. But 
the toilers who inhabit this city of refuge, and 
many of them and their fathers helped to make 
the desert bloom, are permitted to see only the 
desert, and to them it has become a city of an- 
gels of darkness. Cooling zephyrs are wafted 
from the Pacific, palm trees wave, the air is sweet 
with the fragrance of myriads of roses, orange 
blossoms are perpetual, and the "Master of Life," 
with the aid of human endeavor, never created 
a more enchanting spot. But the slaves of this 
city of refuge, this enchanted spot, have little 
opportunity to cool their fevered brows with the 
cooling zephyrs. It is not theirs to see the wa- 
ving of the palm. The foul atmosphere of the 
mill, the shop, and the factory is substituted for 
the fragrance of the roses. An atmosphere of 
deep gloom always hovers over this city of refuge, 
established by the "philanthropic promoters of 
the open shop," and over the inside portals the 
miserable lotus eater always sees the heart-chill- 
ing inscription, "Abandon hope all ye who enter 
here." 

Lured by advertisements displayed in many 
cities, thousands of workmen have traveled to the 
"City of the Angels," the celebrated city of ref- 
uge, the great "open shop" city. 

One who came was a molder, a fine specmien 
of manhood and a master of the craft. He had 
come from parts on the other side of the desert 
where the "iniquitous unions" still flourished, and 
he carried a union card. He had been paid fair 
wages in the parts from whence he came and he 
had worked nine hours five days a week and en- 
joyed a Saturday half-holiday. There were no 
palms there, and the cruel frosts precluded the 
possibility of orange blossoms "being trans- 
formed into golden fruit." But there were roses 
and stately and waving trees and velvety grass. 
On Saturday afternoons, with Molly and the baby, 
it had been possible to roam the woods and enjoy 
the beauties of nature. Even grim winter, with 
its howling winds and chilly frosts and snows, had 
been robbed of many of its discomforts, when 
warmly wrapped, with Molly and the baby by his 
side, they had taken part in a bobsled ride with 
its accompaniment of tooting horns and jingling 



sleigh bells, or when he enjoyed the heat of a 
crackling stove, listening to the chatter of baby 
or the gossip of Molly after the day's work was 
over. "The iniquitous union" had made it possi- 
ble for him to enjoy life even on the "Bleak New 
England Coast." 

He sought employment in the "City of the 
Angels." He went to a foundry and made known 
his desire to secure a job. He was told that it 
was not the custom to employ men at the gates 
of establishments in this city of refuge, but that 
a nicely equipped office had been established for 
that purpose. That the "open shop philanthrop- 
ists" were so mindful of the necessities of "free 
and independent workmen" that they desired to 
make the securing of empolyment a comfort in- 
stead of a weary hunt. 

With eager and hurried steps he made his way 
to the office as directed, thanking God for guid- 
ing him into such a "Land of Promise." The 
office, the employment bureau of the Employers' 
Association, he found in a splendid building. He 
was not even required to walk up stairs. An ele- 
vator, equipped with all modern devices, raised 
him in a moment to the desired floor. He found 
the agent of the Employers and was received in 
a smooth, oily manner. Again he thanked God 
for a system so much better than that which was 
in operation in the parts from which he came, 
where he had been compelled to stand at a foun- 
dry gate and seek employment from a rough- 
spoken foreman. The agent of the Employers 
purred at him, asked him in a velvety manner 
to make his wants known, and the molder's heart 
warmed to the polished gentleman who was so 
condescending and obliging. 

"Are you a union man?" softly purred the agent 
of the Employers. "I am," replied the molder. 
Then the glory departed. The agent of the Em- 
ployers, of the "open shop philanthropists," no 
longer purred. He was no longer condescending 
or obliging, but replied in icy tones, "You can 
not secure employment here. This is an open 
shop city. We employ only free and independent 
workmen." The molder grew pale. His visions 
began to vanish and the sun in the "Land of 
Promise" did not seem to shine nearly as bright. 
He had heard of the "open shop" and of "free 
and independent workmen." The proposition had 
not appeared a bad one. It surely would be great 
to be a "free and independent workman" and an 
"open shop," a shop where everybody tliat wanted 
to work could find employment, must certainly 
be a good thing. He had crossed the continent 
to learn that the "open shop" was a myth, a de- 
ceit and a snare, and that the wily "philanthrop- 
ists" who promoted them were liars when they 
asserted that their institutions were open to all. 

He left the office and presented himself at the 
gate of another foundry, offering up a prayer to 
God that all the establishments in the "City of 
the Angels," the city of refuge, would not prove 
to be "open shops." His prayers were unan- 
swered. They were, and when the day closed he 
was convinced that the "open shop" was a closed 
shop, and that there was not a foundry in the 
city of refuge that would employ a real free and 
independent workman. The "City of the Angels" 
would never become his abiding place. True, the 
zephyrs were still being wafted from the Pacific, 
the palms were waving, the fragrance of the roses 
filled the air, and the orange blossoms still min- 
gled with the golden fruit. But he could not cat 



tlic zephyrs or the palms or subsist on the fra- 
grance of the roses or the beauty of the orange 
blossoms. All that was left was the golden fruit, 
but it belonged to another, and frail as it might 
be as a sustainer, he had no right to gather it. 
The gentle, cooling zephyrs, the waving palms, 
the fragrant roses, and the orange blossoms and 
golden fruit lost their charm. He had a vision 
of the bleak New England coast, and although 
he was in a land flowing with milk and honey, a 
land as fair as paradise, he would have parted 
with his all if he could only have been trans- 
ported back to that land where men seek employ- 
ment at foundry gates. 

Another molder came, and, like the first, was 
directed to the employment bureau of the "open 
shop philanthropists." He met the same agent 
and was asked the same question, "Are you a 
union man?" He was not, and answered in the 
negative. The agent smiled on him and purred 
delightfully. His "spirit of independence" was ex- 
tolled and his prudence and intelligence that had 
kept him away from the "tyrannical influences of 
the labor organizations" highly commended. He 
got a job and went to work in an "open shop" as 
a "free and independent workman." Like the first 
molder, who had been cast out into Outer dark- 
ness, he was a splendid workman, but when he 
asked how much pay he would receive he was told 
that the "philanthropists" who operated the "open 
shops'' always paid a man according to his abil- 
ity. He was required to work ten hours a day, 
and was just a little perplexed, but comforted 
himself with the assurance that if he worked 
longer than he had done in the parts from which 
he came he would be handsomely recompensed 
by the "philanthropist" who employed him. Sure- 
ly he had no reason to doubt the "kind, obliging 
gentleman" in the employment bureau, who had 
assured him that he would surely be paid as much 
as he was worth. 

Then pay-day arrived, and he was sure that a 
mistake had been made when he found that he 
had received little more, and probably less, than 
the wages paid unskilled labor in the parts from 
which he came. He went to the foreman, and 
from him to the office, and made his complaint 
known. He was (|uietly informed that no mis- 
take had- been made, that he was being paid just 
what he was worth. Then he awoke to a realiza- 
tion of the fact that in the glorious "open shop" 
the employer was the undisputed judge of a man's 
worth, and that "free and independent workmen" 
were certainly not worth much in the estimation 
of the promoters of the wonderful "open shop" 
system. 

Still he was a "free and independent workman," 
and as such must be accorded the right to pro- 
test. Horror upon horror! Me soon found out 
that a "free and independent workman" ceased to 
be a "free and independent workman" the moment 
he dared question the absolute right of the "open 
shop philanthropist" to assume powers a little 
less than those of Almighty God. Then a little of 
the spirit of a true free and independent workman 
asserted itself and he declared that lie would not 
work for a laborer's wages. Me threatened to 
(luit and was informed that he had that right left 
as a "free and independent workman." Me did 
(|uit. Of course he did not yet blame the oily, 
suave individual in the employment bureau, who 
had secured the job for him, but he did not care 
(Continued on Page 7.) 



:OAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



INSURANCE IN GERMANY. 



The follovvintj statistics, coverins^ the sys- 
tem of workins^ people's insurance in Ger- 
many, were compiled from Energy, a Ger- 
man engineering review: Twenty-six years 
have passed since the first of the workmen's 
insurance measures, the sick benefit law, 
was enacted. A year later followed the in- 
surance bill for accidents in industry, in 
1886 the bill for accidents in agriculture and 
forestry, in 1887 the building trades and ma- 
rine accident insurance law, and in 1889 the 
old-age pension law. 

The insurance of all workmen, including 
apprentices, is compulsory, employer and 
employee being obliged to pay fixed premr-^ 
ums, as established by law, and the Gov- 
ernment contributing a certain amount. 
From 1885 to 1907 the employers contrib- 
uted $973,300,000, the workmen $831,587,- 
500, and the Government $121,662,500, a to- 
tal of $1,946,550,000. In 1906 out of every 
1,000 day laborers 863 were protected by 
sick benefit, all of them against accident, 
and 859 against old age and disability. 

In 1907 there were about 23,000 offices for 
managing the sick fund; the number of in- 
sured was 12,900,000, having increased 27 
per cent, in seven years; the premiums 
rose from $45,957,800 to $74,851,000 in six 
years, and the fund amounted to $60,309,200. 
or about $4.66 per capita. Of the total re- 
ceipts in 1906, $74,851,000, there was paid 
out $67,235,000 for sickness, medicine, medi- 
cal service, assistance to relatives, hospitals, 
recuperation, and funerals. In 1906 the 
workmen paid $48,909,000 to the fund and 
received $63,379,400 (128 per cent.) as in- 
surance. The total number of cases was 
4,950,000, or 41 to every 100 insured. There 
has been a constant increase in the number 
of cases, but this is to be attributed rather 
to the greater readiness of the workmen to 
appl}' for assistance than, to what would 
appear on the surface, an abnormal increase 
of disease. The expense of treating patients 
has also increased from year to year, having 
risen from $10.35 per case in 1900 to $13.14 
in 1906. 

Among other things these statistics sub- 
stantiate the well-known fact that disease 
.seeks its victims in the more poorly paid 
classes of wage-earners — the lower the 
wages the higher the number of victims. In 
Stuttgart in 1907 and 1908, 29.4 per cent, of 
all patients died of tuberculosis; Berlin re- 
ports show similar facts; all other com- 
plaints represent only a small percentage, 
proportionately, of the causes of death. 

More than 9,000,000 persons in industry 
and 11,000,000 in agriculture and forestry 
are protected by accident insurance. The 
amount paid out in 1907 was $35,771,400. 
The number of accidents has multiplied be- 
yond all expectations, since modern industry 
makes it necessary for work to be done with 
great speed ; yet the precautions and guards 
instituted are unprecedented. Then again 
other factors account for the high figure of 
662,901 accidents reported in 1907. More 
and more accidents, even insignificant ones 
formerly disregarded, are now brought to 
the notice of the bureau and physicians. 
Furthermore, the iiulustrial army of Ger- 
many has increased 2,500,000 in six years, 
being recruited from the inhabitants of the 
agricultural districts — that is to say, from 
persons who for the first time become ac- 
quainted with factory life and who mu.st be 
trained. That accidents otherwise avoidable 
result is quite plausible. The number of 



persons who, in 1907, received an indemnity 
for the first time was 144,708. These, to- 
gether with those whose indemnity con- 
tinued from the preceding year, reached the 
startling figure of ap])roxiniately 1,000,000. 
The mortality per 1,000 insured in 1907 was 
as follows for the several callings: Inland 
navigation, 2.45 ; mining, 2.39; teaming, 1.24; 
railroading, 1.16; textile industry, 0.09. 
Complete disability ranged from 0.45 to 0.01 
in gla.ssworks, brickyards and wood and tex- 
tile industries; partial disability from 5.25 in 
iron and steel works to 1.42 in the glass and 
brick industries. The number of accidents 
causing jicrmanent disability has remained 
practftallv at the same height since 1900 — 
1,356. 

The very young and the old naturally suf- 
fer much more from industry, the former 
through inexperience and heedlessness, the 
latter owing to the impossibility of fulfilling 
the demands of the machine — speed and a 
(juick eye and hand. Perhaps the old suf- 
fer also through unwillingness to renounce 
the work that in their youth they were 
capable of performing with distinction. 
Thus it is found that with rising age the 
frequency of accidents increases dispropor- 
tionately. The greatest percentage takes 
place between the ages of 60 and 70 — 16 out 
of every 100 insured. Over 70 years the per- 
centage drops perceptibly, owing to the class 
of work such persons perform. 

Another fact of interest is the frequency 
of accidents on certain days of the week. 
Assuming that, on the average, 1 accident 
occurs every three hours during the year, 
the figures for industry would be 2.37 from 
9 a. m. to 12 noon, and 2.11 from 3 to 6 p. 
m., but on Monday morning they are 2.87 
and on Saturday afternoon 2.74. Hence it 
has been established that the greatest num- 
ber of accidents occur on Monday and Satur- 
day, but especially on Monday. 

The most extensive of the insurance laws 
is the invalid and old-age pension. There 
are 31 offices for managing this department, 
employing 3,800 clerks. In 1907, 14,300,000 
persons were protected by the invalid and 
old-age pension, the increase since 1900 be- 
ing about 10 per cent. In 1907, $41,174,000 
was paid as pensions, benefits, etc., as com- 
pared with $63,379,400 for sickness and 
$35,771,400 for accidents. Since 1900 the in- 
demnities have almost doubled. The pre- 
miums of the workmen amounted to about 
$19,516,000, or somewhat more than one-half 
of the indemnities. The general adminis- 
tration cost about $2,380,000, or approxi- 
mately $1.67 per insured person. The fund 
increased from $201,110,000 in 1900 to $334,- 
152,000 in 1909, which is about $23.80 per 
capita insured. This great sum of money is 
placed out, principally in loans to villages 
and private persons, in supporting the credit 
of agricultural districts, and in erecting 
good, sanitary workmen's dwellings, bath 
houses, sanitariums, and similar institutions. 
The mean rate of interest on the money so 
invested has varied since 1900 from 3.53 to 
3.55 per cent. At the beginning of 1909 the 
statistics showed that 868,086 invalid, 108,- 
637 old-age, and 19,087 sick pensions would 
have to be paid during the current year. 
This is about the same number as is pro- 
vided for by the accident insurance. 

Since 1907 the number of invalid pensions 
has risen from about 305,000 to 868,086, but 
owing to the efficacy of this department of 
insurance, the strain on the old-age pension 
fund has gradually diminished, the number 
of old-age pensions having decreased from 



203,955 in 1896 to 108,637 in 1909. The 
.same effect is to be noted in the sick pen- 
sions, the number of applicants having be- 
gun to drop in 1907. Furthermore, the 
amount of the pensions has steadily in- 
creased — about 17 per cent, in seven years. 
There is still, however, considerable differ- 
ence between pensions in the agricultural 
and in the industrial districts, since the 
population of the latter is among the better 
paid classes of workmen, insuring the higher 
pensions by higher premiums. Thus, the 
average invalid pension in East Prussia in 
1907 amounted to $33.90; in Berlin $42.24; 
and in the industrial district of Bechuni 
$51.49. 

The causes of invalidity have proved to be 
chiefly enervation, anaemia, senility (men 15 
per cent, and wom.en 22.1 per cent.), diseases 
of the lungs other than consumption (men 
16.7 per cent, and women 8.9 per cent.), con- 
sumption (men 15 per cent, and women 9.5 
per cent.), rheumatism, gout, diseases of the 
limbs, and nervous troubles (men 15 per 
cent, and women 18.6 per cent.). Up to the 
age of 35 more than half the recipients of 
invalid pensions in industrial occupations 
sufTer from tuberculosis of the lungs, in the 
younger classes almost two-thirds. The sick 
insurance office is making great endeavors 
to stamp out this plague by special treat- 
ment, by the isolation of incurables as in 
the consumptive stations at Berlin, etc. 



STEAMSHIP COMPANY USING OIL. 



There has been no more interesting an- 
nouncement for a long while than the inti- 
mation that the Hamburg-American Com- 
pany are to build a large cargo liner whose 
twin propellers will be driven by oil engines. 
It suggests that long-standing contest be- 
tween the gas engine and the oil engine as 
a means of marine propulsion is pretty well 
concluded. The new vessel, which is to be 
400 feet long, 52 feet 6 inches wide and 25 
feet 6 inches deep, with a tonnage of 80(X) 
tons, will be fitted with two Diesel engines, 
each of 1500 horse-power. The biggest 
Diesel engine heretofore employed in a ves- 
sel is one of 500 horse-power, supplied to 
the yacht Lady Evelyn. The present 
project, therefore, marks a considerable step 
in advance. The idea of ever employing 
internal combustion engines for the propul- 
sion of battleships has been widely scouted. 
This new step is, however, suggestive of 
the possibilities of the motor-engine. 

Economy, as usual, is the aim in view. 
There will be, among other things, a great 
saving of space.. Boilers will go by the 
board, and a large proportion of the bunker 
space will also be rendered available for 
cargo-carrying. The stokers, the hardest- 
worked and often the most unruly element 
in the ship, will be dispensed with. The 
engineers and a few greasers will do all that 
is wanted. As for the fuel to be employed, 
it will be petroleum residue, the cheapest 
grade of oil, and readily obtainable on cither 
side of the Atlantic. It is the certainty of 
a sufficient supply which is necessarily at 
the base of the venture. 



W. Jagenberg, of Caracas, who has the con- 
cession for the navigation of the River Tuy, 
has been granted the privilege of extending 
his service along the coast from Machurucuto, 
Puerto Tuy, Paparo. Higucrote, and Carenero 
to La Guaira and Puerto Cabello. Mr. Jagen- 
berg has recently imported two American gaso- 
line launches for the river trade mentioned, 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



COAL-MINE EXPLOSIONS. 



The large loss of life and property which 
has recently attended coal-mine explosions 
in England has led owners and managers to 
consider methods by which these losses can 
be prevented, or at least lessened. One of 
the schemes contemplated is for the estab- 
lishment of rescue stations near groups of 
mines, where a trained squad of men can 
always be present with the apparatus to 
hasten at once to the mine in which an ex- 
plosion has occurred and try to rescue as 
many of the imperiled miners and prevent, 
as far as possible, the loss of property. 

One such scheme is proposed in the Dur- 
ham coal fields, where a station is to be es- 
tablished for housing motors, storing breath- 
ing helmets and other apparatus, and pro- 
viding sleeping accommodation for a squad 
of 6 or 8 trained men. A liquid-air plant 
will also be erected, and it is expected that 
almost any coal colliery within the county 
of Durham can be reached within an hour 
of the receipt of a message or call. Men will 
be in constant attendance and under strict 
discipline, and so be available for service at 
any moment. It is proposed also that the 
station be connected by telephone with 
every coal mine in the vicinity. The men 
will be instructed as to their duties by ex- 
perts in the use of breathing helmets and 
all other aparatus which can aid in saving 
life. 

One method is to make use of a head 
dress, to be supplied with fresh air by 
means of bellows, through 60 yards of ar- 
mored tubing, and fitted with telephones. 
It is thought that in most cases 60 yards 
will be sufficient, and it is proposed that 
each colliery should be equipped with one or 
more of these. To cope with cases where 
longer distances than 60 yards from respira- 
ble air might have to be dealt with, the use 
of "aerolith" helmets is proposed, supplied 
with air in a liquid form. There are no 
valves or complicated parts to get out of or- 
der, and they can be used without any spe- 
cial training. A supply of these would al- 
ways be kept ready for use at the central 
station. 

The question of dealing with an outbreak 
of fire at the collieries, with all its attendant 
dangers, has been considered, and a motor 
fire engine, capable of throwing 400 to 500 
gallons of water per minute, and traveling 
over 20 miles an hour, together with another 
motor car, is to be kept at the central sta- 
tion, ready to carry a skilled crew of men 
to any mine at a moment's notice. It will 
be seen that this scheme is copied after the 
fire department methods common in all 
cities for the prevention of fire for the saving 
of life. 



WAGES IN ASIA MINOR. 



The following information concerns 
wages, cost of living, and schools and school 
supplies in the Turkish provinces of Ma- 
mouret-ul-Aziz and Diarbekir : Under cir- 
cumstances such as prevail in this country 
wages are bound to be extremely low in all 
grades of employment, in which the so- 
called skilled laborer is but little removed 
from the . unskilled. With those pursuing 
what may "be called indoor occupations the 
wages are about the same throughout the 
year, but with outdoor occupations wages 
are about twice as much in summer as in 
winter. The following are the wages of 
the more important occupations and trades : 



Daily wages: Carpenters, 32 to 56 cents; 
bricklayers, 40 to 48 cents ; bricklayers' and 
carpenters' assistants, 20 to 28 cents; har- 
vesters, with food, 20 to 32 cents; tailors' 
and shoemakers' assistants, 4 to 16 cents ; 
tinsmiths' and blacksmiths' assistants, 4 to 
12 cents ; common laborers, 4 to 12 cents. 

Miscellaneous: Doctors, per visit, 40 
cents; dentists — pulling a tooth, 20 cents; 
filling a tooth, 20 to 80 cents, according to 
material and standing of the patient ; police- 
men, $6 to $12 per month; telegraph opera- 
tors, $12 to $20 per month. Small as these 
wages may seem, they are more than one- 
third greater than the wages of five years 
ago. 



MODERNIZATION OF CANTON. 



On Shameen, during 1909, a municipal 
bath house was constructed at a cost of ap- 
proximately $8,160. A "go-down" and jun- 
ior staff quarters for the Hongkong-Shang- 
hai Banking Corporation, and a building for 
the Chartered Bank of India, China, and 
Australia are under construction. The ex- 
amination shed and quarters for the outdoor 
staff of the Imperial Maritime Customs, sit- 
uated opposite Shameen, at Honam, was 
completed last year. The bund from Tai-sha- 
tau to Shameen was also pushed forward and 
practically finished. Many new buildings, 
semi-foreign, were erected along the bund 
during this time. At Tai-sha-tau the imposing 
railway terminus for the Canton-Kowloon 
Railway was completed. At Tungshan, resi- 
dences and railway buildings for the use of 
the staff, and also several schools and resi- 
dences for American missionaries have been 
constructed. During the year the new dormi- 
tory building of the Canton Christian College 
was completed at a cost of about $14,300. 

About one-half mile outside the east gate is 
the legislative building of the provincial assem- 
bly. This building was so far completed as to 
permit of the assembly sitting during the latter 
part of its session in November. 



FINNISH PILOTS TO RETIRE. 



Authoritative advices from Russia, dated 
June 11, state that the pilots of Finland 
threaten to resign in a body in. consequence 
of a recent decision of the Russian Govern- 
ment to appoint a naval officer as chief pilot. 
The resignation of the Finnish pilots may, 
it is feared, involve the appointment of sub- 
stitutes who lack the lifelong training nec- 
essary to navigate the dangerous coasts of 
Finland, with its sunken rocks and narrow 
fiords. As a result, it is claimed marine in- 
surance rates for cargoes to and from the 
ports affected will be necessarily increased. 
American interests would be concerned in 
the shipments of flour to Helsingfors and 
of wood pulp from that port to the United 
States. 



The government has established a fixed 
bright harbor light at the port of San Fernan- 
do, 30 miles south of Port of Spain, on the 
west coast of Trinidad. San Fernando is 
prospectively the gulf port for a large district, 
supposed to be rich in oil deposits. The light 
is carried on a pole at the end of the steamers' 
jetty, 40 feet above the high-water mark of 
ordinary tide. 



The Compania de Trasportcs Fluvial y Cos- 
tanera de Venezuela has purchased the French 
steamer Ville de Tanger and will put this ship 
in the coasting service of Venezuela at once. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, lyi 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Subdivisions. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, 1^ Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Maritime Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 143 West Madison St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, SS Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle 
Wash. 

Bay and River Stcamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Australasia. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Duncdin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Rldg., .Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus 
tralia. 

25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf, Rockhnmpton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundabcrg, Queensland. 
Great Britain. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E., 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull. 

Belgium. 
Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Diepestr 
152, Antwerpen, Belgium. 

Germany. 
Zentralverband Seemannischer Arbeiter, Ham 
burg 1, Bensenbinderhof 57, IV., Zimmer 54 
(Gewerkschaftshaus), Germany. 

France. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place de la 
Joliette. 

Norway. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund, Stavanger, Norway. 

Sweden. 
Svcnska-Sjomens-og Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 
Denmark. 
Somandenes Forbund, Kobcnhavn, Holdbod- 
gade 11, Kid., Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobcnhavn, Told- 
boldgade 8, Denmark. 

Holland. 
Algcmeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, 2 e 
Atjehstr. 6, Amsterdam. 

Italy. 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Mare, 
Geneva Vico Casosini, No. 8, Italy. 
Austria. 
Verband dcr Handcls-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
bcitcr und Arbciterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschctto 5, Austria. 

Spain. 
Fedcracion Nacional de Obreros de Mar de 
Buques V puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 (Bar- 
celoneta), Spain. 

Uruguay. 
Sociedad dc Rrsistcncia de Marineros, Monte- 
video, Ranipla 103, Uruguay. 

Argentina. 

Lcga Obrera (.Sailors and Firemen) Sinforiano 
Corvctto. Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos) 
iiiid Suarez 44. 



oOAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



A scheme to regulate output in 
time of strike has been adopted by 
the Miners' International Congress in 
Europe. 

The International Miners' Congress 
at Brussels unanimously demanded a 
law for fixing a minimum wage in 
proportion to the cost of living. 

The German Metal Workers' Un- 
ion, which includes all branches of 
the iron industry, has £500,000 of 
accumulated funds at its disposal. 

King O'Malley, Australian Minis- 
ter for Home Affairs, has decided 
that the question, "Arc you out of 
work? If more than a week, say 
how long," shall be included in the 
next census papers. 

As the Perth tramway unionists in 
West Australia are out to secure an 
eight-hour day of labor, the foreign- 
bossed company, whose services they 
left, cannot find a man low enough 
to take their places. 

Broken Hill (Australia) miners, 
taking time by the forelock, have ap- 
pointed a committee to propose a 
list of grievances for submission to 
the managers of the mining compa- 
nies with the object of obtaining re- 
dress. 

The Secretary of the Factory Em- 
ployees' Union of Australia, in Syd- 
ney, says that the wages paid in such 
industries as making cardboard boxes, 
pickles, glue, etc., are below European 
rates and degrading the womanhood 
of Australia. 

The latest feature of the Perth 
(West Australia) tramway men's 
strike, which is still on, was a pro- 
cession of women sympathizers held 
for the purpose of agitating that the 
Government should nationalize the 
tram service. 

The Trade-Union Secretaries' As- 
sociation of Victoria, Australia, has 
decided to ask the secretaries of the 
various unions to bring under the no- 
tice of members the advisability of 
undertaking a combined industrial 
organizing visit to Tasmania. 

The result of the ballot among the 
New Zealand Amalgamated Society 
of Railway Servants is that an over- 
whelming majority of votes has been 
cast in favor of solidarity; in other 
words, favoring direct and equal de- 
partmental representation of each 
branch of the service in the councils 
of the society. 

About three hundred employes at 
Simpson & Son's foundry, .'\delaide. 
struck for better conditions recently. 
The women employed by the firm 
came out with the men, one married 
■•voman stating that she had been in 
receipt of 10s. a week until recently, 
when her wages were increased to 
12s. All the labor organizations in 
Adelaide supported the strikers with 
a result that they won. 

A recent Trade and Labor Union 
Congress, held at Auckland (N. Z.), 
composed solely of representatives 
of industrial organizations, has given 
birth to an independent labor party, 
free from the trammels of all other 
parties, in New Zealand. A progres- 
sive platform has been adopted 
which, among other planks, includes: 
Immediate nationalizatioii of monop- 
olies; no further sale of Crown lands; 
tenants' right to improvements; 
graduated land tax; State bank; aboli- 
tion of legislative council; right to 
work; equal pay for equal work for 
males and females; and State assist- 
ance in maternity. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Union Made Clothing for Sea Faring Men 

MEN'S SUITS MADE TO ORDER 



First Class Goods Low Prices 



r. M. 8. C. B. CAMMOM 439 Front, 440 Beacon St., San Pedro 



BEN. B. LIPPMAN 

532 BEACON & 531 FRONT, next to Fritz & Ernest 
SAN PEDRO CAL. 

COMPLETE SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

Un'on GoodM for Union Men 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEAl-ER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect our 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BRO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 1886, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am In position to know the cla.bs of goods you want. The 8an Francisco 
Hickory Shirt .at 60 cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR H.\T, either 
soft or stiflf, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 



■^^feERtP 



JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
V1ARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street, 

Between Front and Beacon 8ta., 

SAN PEDRO. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST.. OPP. I. P. DEPOT. 

BAN PEDRO. CAL. 



WALK-OVER SHOES 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 

LEVY'S DEPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

515 Front St. 514 Beacon St. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro. Cat 

Dealers in 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories. 
NO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Fred Bjorn or Bjornsen, a native of 
Trondjem, Norway, is requested to 
communicate with his brother, H. J. 
Bjornsen. Address H. J. Bjornsen, 
Well Street Sailors' Home, London 
E., England. 

James Murphy, marine fireman, 
last heard of from Sydney, and sup- 
posed to be sailing out of San Fran- 
cisco, is inquired for by Ellen Mur- 
phy, Lawrence St., Liverpool. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Soren P. Nielsen, a native of 
Aarhus, Denmark, born 1887, is in- 
quired for by his sister. Address, 
Danish Consulate, New Orleans, La. 

Arthur Taplett, age 18, last heard 
from at Wilmington, N. C, in April, 
1908, is inquired for by relatives. 
Please forward any information con- 
cerning him to Mrs. Eleanor M. Her- 
man, R. F. D. No. 4, Box 310, Ta- 
coma, Wash. 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Aire, Oscar Le Rloa, Sylvian 

Anderson, T. -557 I,arsen, J. -1542 

Anderson, J. G. Michelson. J. 

A bell, B. Moss, A. 

Andersson, G. -41 Menz. Paul 

Andersen, A. M. Meyer, H. 

-1055 Moore, J. M. 

Andersen, A. 1447 Mesak, Eduard 

Anderson, J. -1514 McDonough, W. 

Adams, Jacob Maroth, Richard 

Ambearnsen. Algoy Mueller. Hugo 

Apps, P. Nielsen, Sivert 

Anderson, Martin Nielsen. A. -1054 

Andtrson, Charlie Newman, David 

Andtr.son, Gust Neyander, Alex. 

Anderssen, Frank ^'^'^""- John C. 

Anderson, Carl Nordgren Chas. 

Arrhenius, Chas. Nestor, Wilson 

Behrend, F. C. j!''sf ".J-. ,"'!>" 

Birry. James ^ord, Emil 

i?anrr"w^™''' Nels'Sn,"Ed;,ie 

goSfr'o!^;'. Yy. N.^^holas, Thomas 

Bentsen, Hans P^hi^i^ V i, 

Boylan, C. J. (pkg) §^'Tp^ 4'^4'"^'" 

Blumquist, C. ^,' , "?,'' „„, 

Bordjelni, Alex. S^^""'^' P- -HO* 

Bowman, K. Hj. 9]^^"- ?■ -*>**^ 

Beyerly. Kupert H.!^"' "^-^u 

Bell. Frank M. Ottesen, Chas. 

Carlson. Carl Opperman. W . 

Christensen, M. X^'^^- 9/^ ,, 

Christiansen, fiigil xl^,^"' Hjjgbart 

Christenson. H. 2^'^**"'t,^?^- 

Dibble, P. W. Ojsen, Pete 

Eugene, John O sen, George A. 
Emanuelsen, A. -661^ '*s°"'„V' a 

Erickson, John R^?"; °^u^;„„„ 

Erickssen, J. E. Olsson, Johannes 

Fletcher, Billy g^^^""' ^"'"f?" 

Fasig, Don Peachman. Geo. 

Fritzheim. R. g*'^^""' ^"'^„ ,,.,. 

Frantsen, N. -562 S|?|„^^°"a^- ^io- 

Gustavsen, Gustav Kfrf H; .,!.,., ^ 

Graham, L. M. Peterson, John 

Gunwalds. G. g'''^!:?°"v,^- 

Gustafson, John geratis, N 

Gronvold, Peter ItlHH'^- g^^ar 

Gustafson, Johan i^etersen. uscar 

Gutman, E. ^^'^|n7 ' 

Henriksen, Albert .,_ -1^07 

Hogstrom. A. Peterson, A. K. 

Heckman. Fred Persson, H] -1230 

Hedlund, Arvid S^"''''^""'^*^^??;,, 

Haltnes, Magnus Petersen C. -1092 

Hansen. H. -2UG0 g'^?1"^"''°""^Vo^- , 

Heide, Tom Petersen, M. (Pack- 

HJelt, NIfk _.^ge>_ 



Hillig, Albert 



Riou, Paul 



Helniar, O. (Pack- Robshain J. W. 

^,,g) Raymond. J. 

Hansen, Carl Rodgers. Charles 

Harris, John E. Rokow. Stefan 

Hilke, Carl Strom, Osc'ar 

Hansen, Peter K. Sorensen, M. 

Hassan, G. Sievers, Herman 

Hansen, L. -794 i°''f"sen. Ing. 

Hansen. Hans IJ.^ ^s. Everett 

Husby, Lars Shelenz. Hans 

Isaacksen, Kris ten i°''?"sen. C. -1607 

Isaacson. Gustav f^o". ^- «• -20'" 

Insebretsen. O. -125 Spearing, Gustav 

John, Robert I'^PSO"! p. C. 
Johansen, C .M. -ISHaf"'!"?' ''"''a h, ,- 

JanscheWitz. J. f^^ren/erf ' jtn es 

Janson. G. W. QnaHnpn H 

Johnstadt J S. samson, Kristian 

Johnsen. A. G. Svensen, G. -1579 

Johansson, A. -2050 a„v,i„o„o%- i 
Jensen, lall 
Johnson, G. B. 

Jellings, R. V. g^^^^ c. -1648 

J. -14bJ oKnii r- V 



Sholl, F. K. 
Scarabosia, M. 



''" Schlosser, L. 
Sjostrom, Gus 
Schutte, Richard 

Johansen, 
Jobsen, Ch. 

Janson, Julius _ ,.. ,, 

Kinsev. W. A. -207 i"?V"; '^■^ , 

Kolkih. Fred Schluter. Paul 

Kopp, Franz .Scjiwanewede G. 

Kustel, Victor i'"""^"' ^- ?' 

Keilman, Joe Thomas, Paul 

Koso, Pete Thor, Waino 

Kusik, M. Tetter. Anton 

Kleishman. F. Tufte. A. Paulsen 

Kallas. Alex. Tuominen, Alfred 

Kristensen. Jens Touanne. Walter 

Kallas. M. Utby. Carl 

Larsen. Martin Vongehr, Ed. 

Larson. Jack JX!?.*^^"' ^■'^- „, 

Lindegard, John 5,!'l='"'="vy^ ' ,^ " 

Lewis, George H. S,"?teis^ Charles 

Larsen. Klaus L. Wrig, Ferdinand 

Leith. Chas. W^ychgel, J. 

Louis. Michael Werner, Henry 

Larsen, Chris. T. Wallace, Luke 

Larsen, Christian Wilemsen, H. 

Lange, Freidrich Youngren, E. 

Lyche, Harris Zorning, Arthur 

Lang, Gust. Zornow. Herbert 



When Drinking Beer 
See that this Lahei is 
on the Keg or Bottle 




ALL LOS ANGELES BEER 
IS UNFAIR 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Exports of canned salmon from Puget Sound 
during Septemljer were more than 300,000 pounds 
in excess of shipments during the same month 
hist year. 

The following vessels were enrolled at tlie San 
Francisco Custom-house on October 6: Schooner 
Matha Nelson, E. Jensen master; steamer On- 
isbo, F. L. Role master. 

The schooner Evelina was sold at auction by 
United States Marshal Elliott at San Francisco 
on October 3 under order of Court for a debt. 
The highest bidder was G. W. Freethy, whose bid 
was $465. 

The following vessels were enrolled at the San 
Francisco Custom-house on October 4: Steamer 
Riverside, John Dallquist master; schooner Eve- 
line, G. W. Freethy master, and ship Charles E. 
Moody, H. Larsen master. 

The steamer Chiriqui, belonging to the Pacific 
Steam Navigation Company, and plying between 
Panama and Buena Ventura, is reported lost by 
an explosion of her boilers off Garachine, in the 
Gulf of Panama. 

L. J. Schage has been appointed master of the 
steamer Falcon vice John Dallf|uist; John Lari- 
more of the steamer Patrol vice Joseph J. 
Meaney; August E. Asklund of the schooner 
Carrier Dove vice William P. McCarty. 

H. E. Mclsaac and A. E. Haw, two wireless 
experts, have arrived at Aberdan with instruments 
and are at work re-establishing wireless service 
between the bar and the upper harbor. They 
are lessees of the United Wireless Company. 

The tug Hercules sailed from San Francisco 
on October 1 for Portland, where she will take 
in tow a big dredger destined for Honolulu. 
The dredger is to be used in the Government 
work at Pearl Plarbor. 

The steamship Mayfair, bound from San Fran- 
cisco to Willapa Harbor and five days out, was 
picked up ofT the latter port on October 6 with 
lier rudder gone. She was towed to Lindstrom's 
yard in Aberdeen, where she is undergoing re- 
pairs. 

The steamship Northwestern, the last vessel to 
make the trip to Behring Sea this season, sailed 
from Seattle on October 2 for Nome, Alaska. 
With the departure of the Northwestern com- 
munication by water with Seward Peninsula 
points is cut off until next June. 

A hospital costing $150,000, with accommoda- 
tions for forty-eight patients, is being completed 
at the Puget Sound Navy Yard. The accommoda- 
tions now provided, are so meager that a large 
wing accommodating forty-eight more patients 
must be built as soon as money can be obtained 
from Congress. 

The salmon season just closed registered three 
losses to the cannery concerns. A had fire at 
Nushagak destroyed the Warren cannery with 
29,C00 cases of canned salmon, valued at $150,000. 
Most of this loss will fall upon foreign under- 
writers. The packets Tacoma and McEaurin 
were damaged in collision. 

It was reported at Ottawa on September 30 
that the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company 
had completed negotiations for the purchase of 
the Pacific Mail Steamship Company's fleet and 
had given the latter company a check for $6,730,- 
125. This report is emphatically denied by the 
Pacific Mail officials. 

The steamship Redhill, which arrived at Seattle 
on September 30 from the Orient, sighted wreck- 
age, lumber and large dressed timbers, many of 
them thirty feet long, about fourteen miles off 
Cape Beale, Vancouver Island, on the 2Sth. The 
lumber is supposed to have been from the deck 
load of some vessel. 

The United States Geodetic Survey cutter Ex- 
plorer, Captain Dibrell. which spent last winter 
in San Francisco, has finished her work in Bris- 
tol Bay and will proceed to Honolulu. It is said 
that the rex-ised map of Alaska, which will be is- 
sued this winter, will be a marked improvement 
on any previous publications. 

The well-known steamer Lonsdale, formerly 
engaged in the Mexican trade for the Canadian 
Mexican line, has been purchased by that com- 
pany and will be operated bctwen Victoria and 
.Salina Cruz. By the purchase of this vessel the 
Canadian Mexican line will keep up its regular 
monthly service with the south. The Lonsdale 
will probably be commanded by Captain Bate. 

The following vessels were enrolled at the San 
Francisco Custom-house on October 6: Steamer 
Dauntless, George W. Morris, master; steamer 
J. C. Elliott, L. T. Ward, master; sloop Red Rock, 
Ludwig Larsen, master; schooner Ruby, H. C. 
Guth, master; schooner Fortune, Simon F. Kil- 
dall, master. John Scoby has been appointed 
master of the steamer Tampico, vice J. D. Faria. 

During the last season the .Maska salmon fleet 
of sailing packets has been fortunate in that 
none was lost, in marked contrast to the annals 
of several previous years. In spite of this fact, 
however, underwriters state that insurance risks 
on the cargoes of Alaska salmon squareriggers 
are unprofitable at present rates, and it is ex- 
pected that before the opening of next season 
a further advance in premiums will be put into 
effect. 



Puget Sound is greatly interested in the fact 
that the barkentine Everett G. Griggis and the 
ship Abner Coburn, both arrived at Delagoa Bay 
on September 30. The Coburn cleared Cape 
Flattery four days later than the Griggis, there- 
fore won the race by four days and some hours. 
Both carry lumber. Captain E. B. Sterling hav- 
ing bought a controlling interest in the Griggis 
early this year. Captain Murray commands the 
Coburn. 

The Tacoma Bridge Company has been awarded 
a contract for dredging the channels of the East 
and West basins in the inner harbor of San 
Pedro. The project involves the removal of over 
2,000,000 yards at Qi^ cents per yard. The Gov- 
ernment will itself dredge the channel from the 
turning basin to the entrance to a depth of thirty 
feet. New bids have been asked for dredging the 
entrance from a thirty-foot contour to the rail- 
road wharves north of Dead Man's Island. 

Sudden & Christensen have closed a contract 
with George Jessop of the United Wireless Tele- 
graph Company for the installation of a one kilo- 
watt set of wireless instruments aboard the 
steam-schooner Chehalis. The United Wireless 
Company has also secured a contract to install a 
wireless system on the steamer Carlos of the 
J. Homer Fritch fleet. Contracts were also 
signed with the Union Oil Company for the in- 
stallation of instruments aboard the tankers Whit- 
tier and Roma. 

Alfred Holt & Co., owners of the Blue Funnel 
liners, operating between Liverpool and Puget 
Sound, have issued orders for all of the steamers 
in the fleet to be equipped with wireless ap- 
paratus as speedily as possible. The Marconi 
system is to be installed, and the work will be 
done in the European home port of the vessels. 
One of the first steamers of the fleet to be 
equipped will probably be the Protesilaus. She 
is also the newest of the line. Then will follow 
the Bellcrophon, Titan, Antilochus, Teucer and 
Kecmun. 

Plans are under way for the establishment of a 
steamship service from Tacoma and other Sound 
ports to Mexico and Central America, in which 
the well known Jebsen liners Ella and Erna will 
operate. The Ella and Erna, two German steam- 
ers, were brought to the Coast by M. Jebsen 
to operate in the Mexican service, which they did 
for a time under the house flag of Jebsen & Os- 
trander. They were withdrawn several months 
ago and until recently have been lying idle. They 
are now being overhauled and are expected to he 
running again by November 1. 

The Princess Adelaide of the Canadian Pacific 
Company, recently completed by the Fairfield 
Engineering Shipping Com])any on the Clyde left 
there on October 4 for Victoria by way of St. 
Vincent, Montevideo and Coronel. She is ex- 
pected to arrive on the Coast about Christmas to 
take the place of the Charmer on the Victoria- 
Vancouver run. Chief Engineer MofTat of the 
Charmer is on the new vessel making the trip, 
while the master is one of the Atlantic Ocean 
masters in the Canadian Pacific service. The 
vessel made 18.28 knots an hour on her speed 
trial. 

Ferdinand Westdahl, in charge of the San Fran- 
cisco office of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, 
has directed a letter to the Merc+iants' Exchange 
inquiring of captains and pilots regarding the 
value of the tide indicator located at the south end 
of Alcatraz Island. The structure upon which 
the indicator rests is in need of repair, and be- 
fore starting this work it was thought advisable 
to get the opinion of shipmasters as to whether 
or not the indicator might be of greater assist- 
ance if it were removed to the East Brother 
light station, where mariners could see the state 
of the tide in the shoal channel across San Pablo 
Bay. It is understood that the tides in the en- 
trance and in the channels across the bar are so 
ample as to render the information obtained from 
the tide indicator of little jiractical value. 

The last five or six years has added many 
heavy losses to the long list of salmon vessels 
which have met disaster since 1885. A sailing 
ship with a full cargo of salmon represents a 
value close to $250,0(l0, so it can be seen what 
the underwriters have had to pay when the fol- 
lowing wrecks are recounted: Ship John Currier, 
with full cargo of salmon, lost in Nelson Lagoon, 
August 9, 1907; ship Lucile, with full cargo of 
canned salmon, from Nushagak. wrecked ofif Cape 
Menchikof, August, 1908; bark Star of Bengal. 
with a full cargo of salmon from Wrangell, 
wrecked off Coronation Island, September 20, 
1909; ship Columbia, with cargo of cannery suj)- 
plies from this port for Nushagak, wrecked in 
Unimak Pass, April 30, 1909; bark Servia, lost 
in North Pacific, July, 1905, with a full salmon 
cargo for Karluk. 

F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims of 
all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, California St., near 
Montgomery. Telephones, Kearny 394; Home, 
C 3832. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRA2IER, Secretary -Treasurer, 
1% Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass.. 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md.. 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 221 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 South SL 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumaine St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 674 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main SL 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 
OGI^ENSBURG, N; Y., 70 Isabella St 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies: 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., EasL 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 
ERIE, Pa., 328 German St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 113 92nd SL 
S.\NDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main SL 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 11S5 W. Eleventh St., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 316 W. Kinzie SL 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge SL 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, O., 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, O., 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, O., Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second SL 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Eraser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO. N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 .lefferson St 
TOLEDO. O.. 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH I'ONA WANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDRNSBIIRG. N. Y.. 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY. Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR. O., 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, C, 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, III., 242 South Water St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 317 Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency: 
CONNEAUT. O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



WAI-TKR MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 
One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



noo 



Changes In advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure r. prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers -will be 
published In the .TOITRNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, .nnd accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOTTRNAT. Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 12, 1910. 



THE ATTITUDE OF LABOR. 



The eleventh annual convention of the Cali- 
fornia State Federation of Labor met in Los 
Angeles, Cal., on October 3. The Times ex- 
plosion occurred on the morning of the 1st. 
The obvious misfortune of this coincidence is 
more than offset by the advantage arising 
from it due to the attitude assumed by the 
labor representatives in a situation full of 
difficulty. 

Of course, the delegates to the convention 
were subjected to a great deal of unpleasant- 
ness. They were openly snubbed by the offi- 
cials, press and public of Los Angeles. They 
were treated as suspects, spied upon anrl in- 
sulted by the police. In short, the city did 
just what might have been expected of a com- 
munity that has been systematically poisoned 
by a body of malicious, virulent and utterly 
unprincipled labor haters. All the circum- 
stances surrounding the convention t(rere cal- 
culated to provoke the delegates to resentment. 

To the credit of the labor movement noth- 
ing indicating either fear or anger took place. 
The convention met and proceeded with its 
business in an earnest and dignified fashion. 
To this fact is due the steadying of opinion 
that has been manifested among the public in 
Los Angeles and elsewhere. The delegates to 
the convention kept their heads, and in so 
doing did more to vindicate the good name 
of the labor movement than any amount of 
exhortation by the friends of that movement 
could have accomplished. As things have 
turned out, it is a blessing rather than a mis- 
fortune that the convention of the State Fed- 
eration of Labor met at the moment of great- 
est danger to the labor movement. 

The convention acted on the Times matter 
by appointing a committee to act in conjunc- 
tion with the city authorities. This offer was 
rejected by the Mayor, but the committee was 
given permission by the Chief of Police to in- 
spect the scene of the cHsaster. Following is 
the report of the committee : 

Los Angeles, Cal., Oct. 7, 1910. 
To the Officers and Delegates, California State 
Federation of Labor, Greeting; 

Your committee appointed October 4 to inves- 
tigate the circumstances of the deplorable Times 
disaster, beg to report in part, as follows: 

October 4, 11:45 a. m. — Committee called to 



order by Secretary Tveitmoe. Officers elected: 
H. Hartley, chairman; A. Elken, secretary. Sec- 
retary instructed to proceed at once and get cre- 
dentials from Secretary Scharrenberg to present 
to Mayor Alexander and Chief of Police Gallo- 
way. Adjourned 12:30 p. m. 

October 4, 1 p. m. — Committee called to order 
by Chairman Bartley. Communication to Mayor 
Alexander and Chief of Police Galloway read, 
and being satisfactory to the committee, your 
committee then proceeded to call on Mayor Alex- 
ander and Chief of Police Galloway. Mayor 
Alexander informed this committee that he was 
powerless to appoint this committee to act in 
conjunction with the committee he had previously 
appointed to investigate the Times disaster, as 
that committee's labor was about completed, and 
that the Times officials had ordered said commit- 
tee oft the premises, and that the city employes 
digging at the ruins had quit work at 12 noon, 
this day. Mr. Humphries, who was in charge of 
said work, who just dropped into the Mayor's 
office, upon being asked the pointed question, 
stated that the city employes were still working, 
but catching himself, said, "They were probably 
off the premises at this time," which was 1:45 
p. m. The Mayor then referred us to Chief of 
Police Galloway, who handed this committee 
written permission to pass within the police lines 
at the Times building. The committee then pro- 
ceeded to the scene of the Times disaster. There 
the premises were gone over by this committee 
for about two and one-half hours. The com- 
mittee then proceeded to the Labor Temple and 
discussed their findings at length in executive 
session. Adjourned at 6:10 p. m. 

October 5, 8 p. m. — Meeting called to order by 
Chairman Bartley Secretary noted all members 
present. Conference of committee and attorneys 
and officers of organizations interested. Wit- 
nesses examined and statements taken. Com.mit- 
tee in executive session deliberated on evidence 
at hand. Adjourned at 10 p. m. 

October 6, 9 a. m. — Meeting called to order by 
Chairman Bartley. Secretary noted all members 
present. Witnesses appeared and were ques- 
tioned, making statements to committee which 
were taken by stenographers. Matters referred 
to outside men for investigation and report, also 
summoning of more witnesses. Committee went 
into executive session and deliberated on matters 
before them. Adjourned at 12:30 p. m. 

October 6, 1:30 p. m. — Committee called to 
order by Chairman Bartley. Secretary noted all 
members present. Witnesses examined and state- 
ments taken by stenographer. Investigations 
were then made by committee in executive ses- 
sion. Adjourned 5:30 p. m. 

October 6, 7:30 p. m. — Committee called to 
order by Chairman Bartley. Secretary noted all 
members present. Committee in executive ses- 
sion took up matters and statements that had 
been before the committee this day. Instructions 
were issued to the outside men to investigate and 
report and summon witnesses before this com- 
mittee. Adjourned at 9:30 p. m. 

October 7, 9 a. m. — Committee called to order 
by Chairman Bartley. Secretary noted all mem- 
bers present. Committee in executive session 
summing up evidence before them beg to report 
to' this convention as follows: 

That we find the most efficient way to carry 
on this investigation is to have a sub-committee 
of Brothers Crough, Wellin and Fanning, as- 
sisted by the men in the employ of this commit- 
tee, to act on the scene here in Los Angeles; 
Brothers Elken and Warwick to investigate mat- 
ters of great importance in San Francisco; 
Brother Bartley to take up and investigate im- 
portant niattcrs in Vallejo, and Brother Mason 
to take up and investigate important matters in 
San Jose. We earnestly hope that the sugges- 
tion will be concurred in by this convention as- 
sembled, and we will make a full and detailed re- 
port to your executive board at the earliest pos- 
sible moment, as we have a great many written 
statements and evidence which must be investi- 
gated and deliberated on before this committee. 
We are now in session and will be all day and 
this evening. 

Respectfully submitted, 
H. B.^RTLEY, 

Chairman; 
A. ELKEN. 

Sec. Investigating Committee; 
EDW. CROUGH, 
HARRY WET,LIN, 
E. F. FANNING. 
E. F. M.^SON, 
T. D. WARWICK, 

The attitude of the officials and press of 
Los Angeles toward the convention has 
aroused great indignation among the fair- 
minded public in other localities. A good ex- 
ample of the comment made upon this phase 
of the matter is contained in the following, 
from the Daily News, of San Francisco: 

Well may the delegates to the State Labor 
Federation now meeting in Los .'\ngeles express 
indignation at the contemptible manner in which 
their organization has been treated by highbrow 
officialdom. 

There is welcome for the bankers who are 
gathered in convention in the same city; there is 
only insult for the workers. Not a single city 



official was present to extend the city's freedom 
to the Labor Federation. The bankers were 
shown every consideration. The Labor Federa- 
tion, according to press dispatches, was even 
subjected to police espionage, as if the delegates 
were suspicious characters who needed watching. 

These men assembled to consider labor's prob- 
lems are represeiUative of the best citizenship of 
the land. They stand for the thousands who per- 
form the real work of production, the vast ma- 
jority over those who gain their living by ex- 
ploiting the worker. They represent the great 
trade-union movement which is striving for bet- 
terment of the worker, that he may toil under im- 
proved conditions, have a better chance to edu- 
cate his children and make of them a higher and 
finer type of citizenship; the trade-union move- 
ment which is the worker's only hope against op- 
pression and industrial slavery. 

And these men are not worthy of even a kindly 
greeting from Los .'\ngeles officialdom! 

Wliy? 

Simply and solely because Los .\ngeles official- 
dom is under the direct domination of the Mer- 
chants' and Manufacturers' Association, the body 
which would crush the worker, the body which 
would fasten upon union labor the responsibility 
for the fearful outrage of the Times dynamiting 
if there is any possible way of doing it. 

Call off the strike in Los .Angeles? 

Why should they? 

The Times disaster has no more to do with the 
eternal battle of the worker for right and decent 
conditions of employment than to-day's conflict 
in Portugal. The labor conflict in Los .'\ngeles 
is for the right, and right will and must prevail. 

On the whole, the developments of the week 
have been decidedly favorable to the "pre- 
sumption of innocence" on the part of the 
labor movement. There never was much 
danger that this presumption would be ques- 
tioned among scnsii)le men. It is none the 
less a satisfaction to kmnv that the public 
mind is becoming more and more inclined to 
seek the cause of the Times explosion in quar- 
ters entirely removed from interest in or sym- 
pathy with the cause of organized labor. 
The whole case will be thoroughly investi- 
gated and the guilty parties punished accord- 
ing to their deserts, should it lie in the power 
of the labor movement and the public to ac- 
complish this result. In the end — and we hope 
the end is not far off — the labor movement 
will come through the ordeal stronger than 
before in its own confidence and in the re- 
spect of the public. One result is morally as- 
sured, namely, that the labor movement of Los 
Angeles will gain rather than lose by the fail- 
ure of the attempt to fasten upon it any meas- 
ure of responsibility for an atrocious crime. 
On the other hand, it is equally certain that 
those who have sought to secure an advantage 
for thcinselvcs by casting suspicion upon the 
labor movement will find themselves the ob- 
ject of suspicion which it will be difficult, if 
not impossible to remove. 



FOR ASIATIC EXCLUSION. 



The recent convention of the California 
State Federation of Labor condemned the 
report of State I^bor Commissioner Macken- 
zie on the subject of .Asiatic labor and adopted 
resolutions calling upon Congress to extend 
the provisions of the Chinese Exclusion Act 
so as to exclude all classes of Asiatics. The 
resolutions are as follows : 

Whereas, The menace of Chinese labor, now 
greatly allayed by the passage and enforcement of 
the Chinese Exclusion .'Vet, has been succeeded 
by an evil similar in its general character, but 
much more threatening in its possibilities, to-wit: 
The emigration to the United States and its in- 
sular territory of large and increasing numbers 
of Japanese. Koreans, Hindus and other races 
native of .Asia; and 

Whereas, The American public sentiment 
against the immigration of Chinese labor, as ex- 
pressed and crystallized in the enactment of the 
Chinese Exclusion .\ct, finds still stronger justi- 
fication in the demanding of prompt and ade- 
quate measures of protection against the immi- 
gration of Japanese, Koreans and Hindus and 
other races native of .Asia on the grounds (1) that 
the wage and living standards of such labor arc 
dangerous to. and must, if granted recognition in 
the United Slates, prove destructive of the .Amer- 
ican standards in these essential respects, (2> that 
the racial incompatibility as between the peoples 



COAST SEAJVIEN'S JOURNAL. 



of the Orient and the United States presents a 
problem of race preservation which it is our im- 
perative duty to solve in our own favor, and 
which can only be thus solved by a policy of ex- 
clusion; and 

Whereas, The systematic colonization by tlie 
Orientals of our insular territory in the Pacific, 
and the threatened and partly accomplished ex- 
tension of that system to the Pacific Coast and 
other western localities of the United States, con- 
stitutes a standing danger, not only to the do- 
mestic peace, but to the continuance of friendly 
relations between the nations concerned; there- 
fore be it 

Resolved, By the California State Federation of 
Labor, in Eleventh Annual Convention assem- 
bled, this 6th day of October, 1910, that the terms 
of the Chinese Exclusion Act should be enlarged 
and extended so as to permanently exclude from 
the United States and its insular territory all 
races native of Asia other than those exempted by 
the present terms of that Act; therefore, be it 
further 

Resolved, That these resolutions be submitted 
tiirough the proper channels to the Congress of 
the United States, with a request for favorable 
consideration and action by that body. 



THE SEAMEN'S BILL. 



The Seamen's bill to repeal tliat .section of 
the State law which prohibits "enticing de- 
serters" (i. e., which makes it an offense for 
any one to assist a seaman who may desire to 
leave his vessel, as he has a right to do under 
the Eederal law) was re-indorsed by the re- 
cent convention of the California State Fed- 
eration of Labor, in the following terms : 

Whereas, A bill to amend Section 644 of the 
Penal Code of the State of California, "relating 
to enticing seamen to desert," was vetoed twice 
by Governor Gillett; and 

Whereas, Said bill was indorsed by previous 
conventions of the California State Federation of 
Labor and its passage aided by the legislative 
representatives of this body; and 

Whereas, The enactment of said bill into law 
is necessary to secure to American seamen in the 
ports of this State the right of personal freedom 
equal with that enjoyed by all other classes of 
citzens, a right already recognized and granted 
by the Federal Maritime Law; therefore, be it 

Resolved, By the Eleventh Annual Convention 
of the California State Federation of Labor, this 
6th day of October, that we again instruct our 
legislative agent to endeavor to have said bill 
enacted into law at the next session of the Legis- 
lature. 

This bill has been pas.sed by two sessions 
of the California Legislature, and each time 
has been vetoed or pocketed by Governor Gil- 
lett. The measure is an obviously just one, 
its main purpo.se being to bring the State law 
into conformity with Federal law on the sub- 
ject. It is reasonably certain that the bill will 
be passed by the coming session of the Legis- 
lature, and equally certain that it will be ap- 
proved by the next incumbent of the Gover- 
nor's office. 



Governor Gillett of California has denied 
having said that "labor would be considered 
guilty of the dynamiting of the Times building 
until it had proved itself innocent." The 
Governor asserts that wliat he did say is that 
"labor unions will be blamed for it unless 
they make every effort possible to cause the 
arrest of the parties guilty." There is little 
distinction and less difference between these 
two statements. The most that can be said for 
Governor Gillett in this connection is that he 
combines an utter lack of understanding of 
the labor movement with a weakness for talk- 
ing thoughtlessly on the spur of the moment. 



The first duty of the trade-unionist is that 
of assisting the members of other crafts. 
Demand the tmion label upon all purchases. 



THE "OPEN SHOP" CITY. 

(Continued from Page L) 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journ.xl's ad columns. 



to bother him again right away, and decided to 
seek again a job at some other foundry gate. But, 
like the first molder, he found it useless to apply 
at gates. He was always directed to the employ- 
ment bureau of the "open shop philanthropists," 
and was finally compelled to call on the oily, 
suave employment agent again. He found him 
no longer oily or suave. The purring had also 
ceased, and he was tersely told that he had made 
a miserable start as a "free and independent 
workman"; that the employer who had so kindly 
found employment for him, and demanded the 
services of a skilled workman for a laborer's 
wages, was shocked at his outrageous behavior. 
If the agent happened to be feeling good, the 
workman was informed that intercession might 
be made for him and that his ingratitude might 
be pardoned by the kind employer and his return 
to work at a laborer's wages made possible. At 
times the outraged employer proved magnani- 
mous and the refractory workman was again ad- 
mitted into the city of refuge, to become a lotus 
eater and a chattel slave. 

The union molder who had been barred from 
the city of refuge, secured assistance from a lit- 
tle band of strong union men, who by craft were 
able to maintain positions in the city of refuge, 
hoping and praying for the arrival of the day 
when they miglU be able to break the bonds of 
the enslaving "philanthropists." Through their 
good offices he and Molly and the baby had been 
transported to another coast city, where the city 
of refuge had not yet been established. There 
he had found employment and hope. For on the 
Pacific Coast to-day strong union men are bat- 
tling for human liberty. With courage undaunted 
they are presenting an undivided front to the ene- 
mies of human liberty and the advocates of chat- 
tel slavery, the "philanthropists of the open shop." 
And they will triumph. 

Different was the fate of the other molder. He 
had always considered himself a "free and inde- 
pendent workman." Strong in his own conceit, 
he had always scof?ed at the necessity for an or- 
ganized labor movement and considered himself 
so strong that he did not need a union to help 
him. In the land where the "open shop" had 
not gained control and from which he came, by 
reason of the labors of the unions, he had been 
paid a rate of wages that made it possible for 
him to save some money. He, too, had a wife 
and a baby, and it had taken a lot of money to 
pay for transportation ncross the country to the 
"City of the Angels." His search for work proved 
fruitless in the city and he tried to secure em- 
ployment among the orange blossoms and golden 
fruit. He met with bitter disappointment again. 
No white man need apply for employment in 
such places. The Jap monopolizes that kind of 
work and the Hindus are comin.g by the thou- 
sands. Truly he was in a miserable plight. He 
Tnd the wife and the baby had to be clothed and 
housed and fed. Tt was bitter indeed to be com- 
pelled to suborn the spirit of freedom and inde- 
pendence, but suborned it had to be. He had to 
make complete surrender to the "philanthropists" 
who had established the "open shop." He became 
a chattel slave in order that he and the wife and 
the baby might be permitted to live. Too late 
had he realized what the real "open shop" was. 
The part from which he came was far distant. 
The small wages he received made it impossible 
to save enough money to transport himself and 
tlie wife and the baby back. He was indeed in 
the city of refuge, the real "open shop" city, but 
he had found it a slave mart, and" he had become 
a slave. 

And little better are the conditions under which 
many of the employers, who helped the "philan- 
thropists" to found the city of refuge, are labor- 
ing. They had been told by the "philanthropists" 
that the "iniquitous unions" were stealing away 
their inalienable rights, that they were attempting 
to dictate who they should and who they should 
not employ. Thev listened, believed, and fell into 
the trap. Now they can not hire anyone. The 
"philanthropists of the open shop" insist on do- 
ing all the hiring. The workmen sent them by 
the employment bureau may he incompetent, and 
they may know of other workmen who would 
be invaluable to them, but they are out of reach. 
They are the chattel slaves of some other em- 
ployer, for in their wisdom the "open shop 
philanthropists" have seen to it that a vvorkman 
can not leave one employer and enter into the 
service of another without the consent of the 
first. 

Some of the employers have rebelled against 
such conditions and others equally undesirable, 
and severed connections with the "open shop 
philanthropists," Upon such the unholy wrath 
of the "philanthropists" has descended with stun- 
ning force. Some of them have been forced out 
of business and ruined. Some strong ones are 
still fighting against almost overwhelming odds. 
One of the rebels wanted a load of foundry sand 
:ind ordered it from a firm that had been supply- 
ing it for years. It was refused. He went to 
another firm and was rebuffed and finally had to 
get his sand from a distant city at a greatly in- 
creased cost. And as it is with sand so it is with 
material of every description in the city of refuge. 
If a manufacturer dares to rebel against the au- 
thority of the "philanthropists," he is shown no 
mercy, and often driven out of business and 
ruined. 

Still the gentle, cooling zephyrs are bemg 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 10, 1910. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:.30 p. m., Chas. F. Hammarin presiding. Secre- 
tary reported shipping dull. The delegates to the 
recent convention of the California State Federa- 
tion of Labor submitted their report. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 
44-46 East St. Pacific Phone Kearny 2228. 
Home Phone J 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 4, 1910. 
Situation unchanged. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
122 Alexander St. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 3, 1910. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

11. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 3, 1910. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 3, 1910. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping and pro.s- 
pects poor. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
2291^ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 141 J. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 3, 1910. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

HARRY COOK, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. 225. 



Portland, Ore., Agency, Oct. 3, 1910. 
Shii^ping dull. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 3, 1910, 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67, Tel. Main 662, 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 6, 1910. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p, m,, Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary re- 
ported shipping slow, A quarterly finance com- 
mittee was elected. Officers were nominated for 
the ensuing term, 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955, 



Seattle Agency, Sept, 29, 1910. 
Shipping slow, 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent, 
P, O, Box 1335, 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, Oct, 3, 1910, 
Situation unchanged. 

ALEX, McKECHNIE, Sec'y pro tern, 
674 West Madison St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



lleadciu.-irters, Boston, Mass,, Oct, 3, 1910. 
.Shi|)ping and prospects good. 

PERCY J. PRYOR, Secretary pro tem, 
l;/.\ Lewis Street, 

wafted from the Pacific, Still the palms wave, 
;ind the :<\r is filled with the fragrance of the 
roses. .Still the orange blossoms and the golden 
fruit interminsrie. but the "Cty of the Angels," 
where the dream of the "philanthropists of the 
open shop" has been realized, is a city of slave 
owners, .cl-'ve drivers, and chattel slaves. — .Stuart 
Reid in .\merican Federationist. 



That the Tatoosh Island light and fog signal 
is inrdecpiate to furnish amjile protection to 
navigators entering and departing from Puget 
Sound is the oninion forwarded by Captain Allen 
of the steamship Henry to the Branch Hvdro- 
graphic Office at Port Townsend from Manzn- 
nillo, Mexico, Captain .Mien says he has passed 
Tatoosh Island a ntimber of times in ihick 
wealher within a distance of two miles and that 
he has been unable to hear the signal or see the 
light. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




ON THE GREAT LAKES. 



(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unlont.) 



#^>S^ 



CITY HELD LIABLE. 



Because of an unprotected eight or ten- 
inch stone projection from the abutment of 
the State-street bridge, the city of Milwau- 
kee is held liable for $1600. due the Ken- 
sington Steamship Company for damages 
sustained. 

That was the decision handed down by 
United States Judge J. V. Quarles in the 
case of the Kensington Steamship Com- 
pany, libelant, vs. Sophie Meyer and others, 
claimants of the tugs Starke and Welcome; 
the city of Milwaukee impleaded. 

Touching on that projection, held to be 
protruding eight or ten inches out in the 
river and below the surface of the water. 
Judge Quarles said : 

"It is difficult to conceive a more dan- 
gerous obstruction to navigation. 

"There is no doubt of the responsibility 
of the nnmicii^-i! corporation for negligence 
in this regard. It does not appear that the 
government ever sanctioned the plans by 
which the bridge was built or rebuilt." 

The sole cause of the accident, Judge 
Quarles finds, was the neglect of the city 
to replace the cluster of piles protecting the 
projection or to replace the timbers cover- 
ing it. 

The accident referred to occurred when 
the tugs Starke and Welcome were towing 
the Kensington through the draw in the 
State-street bridge. That draw, it was 
brought out, measures sixty-three feet. 
The Kensington is 350 feet long and has a 
fifty-foot beam. 

Judge Quarles, in handing down his de- 
ci.sion, pointed out that the original plans 
of the bridge, built under the laws of 1874, 
provided for a cluster of piles to protect the 
projecting rock abutment. The bridge was 
rebuilt in 1892, and the piling was not put 
in place again because it was held that a 
w'ood facing of the projection would prove 
sufficient. These wood facings were worn 
or rotted away, and negligence arose, so 
the court held, in not replacing them. 

No negligence, said Judge Quarles, had 
been shown on the part of the tugs, and 
inasmuch as they were not insurers, negli- 
gence must be shown in order to hold them 
responsible for the damage wrought. 



BIDS FOR BIG JOB. 



ANOTHER COAL DOCK. 



Work will soon be started on another big 
coal dock at the head of Lake Superior. 
Regarding the new plant a dispatch from 
Duluth says: The Carnegie Dock & Fuel 
Company has purchased eighty acres of 
land and will erect on the property, which 
adjoins that of the Zenith Furnace Com- 
pany, a coal-handling plant costing between 
$1..S00.000 and $1,750,000. 

J. H. Sanford of Pittsburg, vice-president 
and general manager of the company, has 
been in the city for the past few days ma- 
king arrangements. While the plans of the 
company are not yet definitely formed, it 
is quite possible that work on a $100,000 
hard coal shed will be commenced this fall, 
which will be equipped with temporary un- 
loading apparatus. Work on the rest of the 
plant will be commenced as early in the 
spring as is practicable. 



Four bids for constructing the upper sec- 
tion of the canal to be used in connection 
with the new Davis lock at Sault Ste. Marie 
were opened this afternoon in the office of 
Colone'l C. McD. Townsend, federal engi- 
neer. Each bidder is a Chicago firm. Their 
estimates of cost range from $675,288 to 
$1,072,867.50, the former being figures of 
McArthur Brothers Company and the lat- 
ter submitted by John Marsch, contractor, 
building the Davis lock. The Great Lakes 
Dredge & Dock Company and the W. J. 
Newman Company placed the cost at $688,- 
105 and $904,850 respectively. 

The work to be done, as described in the 
specifications, includes excavation of a por- 
tion of the new navigation channel, building 
canal walls and piers, preparing a new head 
race and forebay with controlling works, ice 
passages and weir, removal of existing and 
building of new dikes and the furnishing of 
all the labor, plant and supplies. 

The section of the canal included in that 
portion of it west of the international bridge, 
to deep water, about 1,200 feet in length, 
of which several hundred feet adjacent to 
the bridge is dry work, necessitating con- 
struction of a cofferdam and removal of 
water before the rock is taken out. 

The canal will be approximately 300 feet 
wide and will have a least depth of a little 
more than twenty-four feet. The engineers' 
estimates on quantities of material to be re- 
moved are: Class A, dredging navigation 
canal, 47,700 cubic yards ; class B, dry work, 
navigation canal, 275,000 cubic yards; class 
C, dry work, head race and forebay, 15,000 
cubic yards; class D, dredging head race 
and forebay, 15,000 cubic yards. 

The estimate calls for 22,000 cubic yards 
of concrete, 27,500 barrels of cement, 15,000 
bricks and 154,000 cubic feet of timber in 
crib framing. 



LAKE SURVEY CHARTS. 



SOME MORE DREDGING. 



The Lake survey steamer Lambton, of the 
Canadian" Marine and Fisheries, made a test 
to ascertain whether boats can now with 
safety pass the place of wreck of the barge 
Grace Whitney at Amherstburg, Ont. 

Several shoal spots were found and the 
steel dredge, Handy Andy, of the Dunbar 
fleet, was sent to begin work to lower the 
depth of the water to twenty-five feet at all 
points. The tug Francis B. Hackett had 
the contract to remove the wreck, and the 
work is in charge of Captain Gordon Hack- 
ett of Detroit. 

Shoal spots will be removed also from 
Ballards Reef in lower Detroit River, where 
several big steamers struck bottom recently. 
The tug G. H. Breymann, accompanied by 
its dredge No. 3, is now at work there. 



CREW RESCUED BY TUG. 



The stone barge Kellogg of Sturgeon 
Bay, laden with 150 cars of stone, turned 
turtle in the heavy sea near Ludington. The 
crew jumped overboard and were rescued 
by the tug Smith. It is thought the barge 
can be picked up after the storm abates. 



For the information of shipmasters and 
others interested in navigation charts of the 
Great Lakes, attention is invited to the fol- 
lowing extract from an agreement approved 
last December, by the Acting Secretary of 
War and the Acting Secretary of the Navy, 
delimiting the respective spheres of activity 
of the U. S. lake survey, engineers' depart- 
ment, U. S. army, and the hydrographic of- 
fice, bureau of equipment (now under bu- 
reau of navigation), department of the navy, 
on the Great Lakes: 

"To enable the preference of Lake navi- 
gators concerning the projection and the 
general make up of charts to be ascertained, 
the hydrographic office will transfer, by 
loan, to the U. S. Lake Survey the copper- 
plates of the general charts on the Mer- 
cator projection, i. e., of those navigators' 
charts which cover an entire Lake or more 
than one Lake. Before the transfer these 
copperplates will be corrected to date by 
the hydrographic office, and it may, if de- 
sired, print a small edition from each plate. 
Thereafter the Lake Survey will keep these 
plates corrected to date and print therefrom, 
under the seal of the bureau of equipment, 
department of the navy, editions of these 
charts as required for sale or issue. The 
charts will be entered in the Lake Survey 
catalogue and given the same opportunity 
for sale as is given the polyconic Lake Sur- 
vey charts. So far as practicable these 
charts will be printed after the manner and 
style of current Lake Survey charts and 
sold at corresponding prices. The object 
of this arrangement is to ascertain the pref- 
erence of navigators and thereafter to avoid 
duplication." 



BREAKING OF PORT-HOLE. 



The breaking of the heavy glass covering 
of a port-hole below the water line by the 
force of the waves is the reason given for 
the sinking of Pere Marquette carferry No. 
18, by the survivors of the ill-fated vessel 
and the officers of ferry No. 17, who reached 
Milwaukee on September 10. In spite of 
the constant working of the pumps, it was 
found impossible to keep the rush of water 
out. 

An investigation was made into the cause 
of the disaster by United States Boat In- 
spectors Frank Van Pattern and William 
Collins. Simon Burke, third-mate of the ill- 
fated ship, and the officers of Carferry No. 
17 were in consultation with the inspector. 

"I am not sure as yet as to the cause of 
the accident," said Inspector Van Pattern 
before the consultation. "The vessel, I be- 
lieve, was recently inspected in Ludington. 
One thing is sure, it was not the fault of 
the men in charge. Their work was of the 
heroic order." 

Burke, who had been in one ocean wreck 
and three on the Great Lakes previous to 
this, did not wait twenty-four hours after 
being rescued before taking a job on the 
No. 17, sister to the lost No. 18. He came 
to Milwaukee as wheelsman on No. 17, but 
remained there to confer with the Federal 
authorities. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



DEEPER LAKE CHANNEL. 



The work of building a new lock in the 
Soo, now being carried on by the Govern- 
ment, is progressing at a satisfactory rate 
and indications are that it will be completed 
about 1913, the Steam Shovel & Dredge 
Company of Chicago says. The lock will 
have a depth of twenty-six feet, while the 
channels on either side of it have a depth of 
twenty feet. Unless the channels are deep- 
ened the lock will be about as useful as a 
fifth wheel on a wagon. 

The necessity of having a deep channel 
which will permit of vessels of twenty-four- 
foot draft going through from Bufifalo to 
Duluth has long been recognized by the 
shipping interests at the head of the Lakes, 
but there is not enough agitation being car- 
ried on to insure its speedy consummation. 

This project should appeal to the busi- 
ness and shipping interests at every port 
along the Lakes. The custom of the Gov- 
ernment in the past has been to complete a 
lock and then dredge the channels to corre- 
spond with the depth of the completed lock. 
There is no reason why the lock building 
and the channel dredging should not be car- 
ried on simultaneously, so that deep draft 
vessels can navigate the channels as soon as 
the locks are completed. 

It has been estimated that the work of 
deepening the channels in St. Marys River 
will require about three years. If the new 
lock is completed in 1913 and the channels 
are not deepened until after the lock has 
been completed, it will be seen that it will 
be about 1917 before Duluth and the region 
at the Head of the Lakes will get the full 
benefit of the improvement. Why not begin 
deepening the channels now? 



WILL BUILD A BIG FLEET. 



The opening "of navigation next year on 
the new barge canal is occupying the center 
of the stage in local marine circles at Buf- 
falo, and from present indications a large 
fleet of steel boats will be operating between 
that port and New York. 

The fleet will cost a small fortune. The 
understanding is that $1,000,000 is to be put 
into the fleet, but no figures were announced 
officially. 

Hugh Ker:?edy, general manager of the 
Rogers Brown Iron Company, announces 
that his company is planning the construc- 
tion of the fleet and that it will operate on 
the canal under present conditions and when 
it is enlarged. 

The fleet, it is announced, will be adequate 
to the requirements of the company's busi- 
ness. The boats will be equipped for use on 
both salt and fresh water. They will be 
fitted with movable hatches, similar to those 
used on the large lake ore boats. The tugs 
will have dynamos and electric cranes for 
handling pig iron to and from the docks, and 
the latest design of coal-saving machinery 
will be used. "Are the boats to be used in- 
stead of shipping iron by rail?" Mr. Ken- 
nedy was asked. 

"No, we are not seeking to cut down our 
rail tonnage," he replied. 

"We will give the railroads all the ton- 
nage we can, but a large part of the ship- 
ments now go by the canal and we want to 
have boats that are fitted to the business." 



Demand the union label on all products! 



STRIKE 

ON THE GREAT LAKES 

COMRADES: 

The strike of Sailors, Firemen and Cooks 
on the Great Lakes is still on. We appeal 
to all seafaring men to assist us in persuad- 
ing seamen to stay away from the Lakes 
during this strike. 

Any reports that the strike has been set- 
tled are false. 

The Seamen of the Great Lakes are sticking to- 
gether solidly, and will keep up the battle for 
freedom and decent conditions until the fight is 
won. "God Almighty hates a quitter." (So do 
we.) 

Lend a hand, comrades, by inducing seamen to 
stay away from the Lakes while the strike is on. 
Yours fraternally, 

LAKE DISTRICT, 

International Seamen's Union of America. 

STRIKE ON THE GREAT LAKES 
KEEP AWAY! 



"CALL THE WATCH!" 
An Acrostic. 



Plod on, ye toilers of the sea — 

Each day uphold your cavise, 
.\nd jointly stand resolved to be 

Released from cruel laws. 
I. anient no more, hut cease to fear 

Rebuffs of sordid caste! 
Injustice then will disappear; 

Glad tidings come at last. 
Glide on in union and in peace, 
So shall you find from wrong surcease. 

Star Key. 
Marshficld, Oregon. 



LITTLE VESSEL LOST. 



Failing to make port through the fog at 
Port Washington, and caught in pound nets 
in her attempt to return to Sheboygan har- 
bor, the schooner Challenge, Captain 
O'Brien, of Chicago, lies on the beach twelve 
miles south of Sheboygan, a total wreck. 
On being caught in the pound nets the 
schooner began leaking, and the crew, which 
included Captain O'Brien's son, Edward, and 
Charles and William Wolf of Milwaukee, 
began pumping, but, becoming exhausted, 
it was necessary to save the lives of those 
on board by beaching the vessel. The run- 
ning gear, sails, etc., were stripped from 
the Challenge and placed on the beach, and 
the party, which included O'Brien's wife, 
walked several miles to a summer resort. 
Captain O'Brien and his wife were saved 
from the schooner Commerce when it turned 
turtle and sank ofif Sheboygan about a year 
ago. 



DREDGING CONTRACTS AWARDED. 



Lieutenant Colonel James C. Warren, 
federal engineer of Bufifalo district, has re- 
ceived approval of the War Department on 
recommendations on bids opened at Buf- 
falo August 16. Contract for dredging at 
Erie, Pa., is awarded the Great Lakes 
Dredge & Dock Company, Chicago ; for ex- 
cavating in channel of Niagara River below 
Black Rock canal locks, Arthur PI. Vogel, 
Milwatikee; for supplying steel lock gates, 
pumping plant, etc., D'Oiler Engineering 
Company, Philadelphia. In each case the 
contract is given lowest bidder. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Charles Bourroughs, No. 2745, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by his father. 

Findlay J. McDonald, No. 5499, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by John D. Mc- 
Donald, Highland Park, Mich. 

Comrade Henry Blaschke. Any one 
knowing the above-named comrade please 
communicate with Jno. Rook, Jr., 2564 E. 
55th St., Cleveland. 

Roy Person, No. 12522, L. S. U., is in- 
quired for by his sister. Miss Hazel Person, 
225 Chisholm street, Alpena, Mich. 

William Young, a marine fireman, aged 
50 years, last heard of twelve years ago, is 
inquired for by his sister. Address, Mrs. 
Anna M. Mills, 644 W. 61st street, Chicago, 
III. 



OLD WRECK ABANDONED. 



Dispatches from Port Dover, Ont., an- 
nounce that after working two weeks the 
salvaging expendition sent out by Enos B. 
Petrie of Brooklyn has abandoned the 
Avreck of the old sidewheel steamer Atlantic. 
The Atlantic was sunk in collision with the 
steamer Ogsdenburg, ofif Long Point in 
1852, and stories were told of her havinff 
taken down about $400,000 in currency. 

Petrie had a wrecking outfit and two deep 
water divers from New York aiding in the 
search. Captain McGroder of Cleveland, 
who is said to have located the wreck in 
1873, assisted the Petrie expedition to find 
it. Captain McGroder organized a com- 
pany many years ago to recover the treas- 
ure, but before its object was attained the 
company became bankrupt. 



For fair products of all kinds patronize 
the Journal's advertisers. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

674 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Teleplione, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

MILVi^AUKEE. Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 21 High Street 

Telephone Bell 175 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 1890. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 Third Street 

Telephone, New Phone, Broad 155 L. 

BAY CITY, Mich 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSnURG. N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96) King Street 

ERIE, Pa 328 German Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR, 922 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 113 92nd Street 

Telephone 2853 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 



HOSPITAL AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



RELIEF 
Ashl;md. Wis. 
Ashtnbula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escnnahn, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Mich. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mtch. 



STATIONS. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Mar(|uette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan. Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo. O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



RUSSIAN EMIGRATION. 



Russian emigration durinp^ 1909 reached 
the highest figures in the history of tlie 
country, the great majority leaving for Si- 
beria, where, it is believed, 300,000 settle 
annually. 

The emigration of peasants from central 
and northern Russia to Asiatic Russia has 
assumed enormous proportions since the 
Russo-Japanese war and the opening up of 
that immense territory by the Trans-Siberi- 
an Railway. Thousands of the poor from 
the Ural Mountains section travel by foot 
with their few belongings. Up to 1906 it 
is estimated that only 60,000 persons settled 
in the new country, but since then there 
has been a marked exodus from all parts of 
European Russia, and during the favorable 
seasons the railroads are unable to trans- 
port all applicants for tickets to Siberia. 
Special cheap rates are granted by the state 
railways to selected emigrants and their 
families, while a considerable number of 
peasants, in an endeavor to better their lot, 
travel at the ordinary rates. 

In the prescribed districts, the state allots 
41'J^ acres to each adult immigrant. Whole 
districts in luiropean Russia have been de- 
nuded of their male population, and a travel- 
er on the lines leading out of Moscow to 
the west, north, and east will notice on his 
journey thousands at the stations along the 
way, with their few possessions packed up 
in sacks and handkerchiefs, waiting for the 
emigrant train to carry them to their new 
homes, where they expect living conditions 
to be more favorable to themselves and 
families. 

On the other hand, a visit to the port 
cities on the days that the steamers leave 
for America will reveal another phase of 
the Russian emigrant who has been pro- 
vided with sufficient money to land him 
safely in New York. No figures are obtain- 
able in Russia as to the number of Russians 
leaving for the United States, but statistics 
furnished by the United States Bureau of 
Immigration show that 120,460 people 
w-hose last permanent residence was Russia, 
divided as follows, landed in America dur- 
ing the fiscal year ending June 30, 1909: 
Finns, 11,202; Hebrews, 39,150; Othuani- 
ans, 14,595; Poles, 37,770; Russians, 9,099; 
Germans, 7,781 ; others 863. The majority 
of these emigrants were carried on German 
boats from German ports, but the Russian- 
American line from Libau to New York, 
which has recently made a strong bid for the 
emigrant trade, carried 14,478 steerage pas- 
sengers for the calendar year 1909. 

On account of the Government's firm at- 
titude toward the Hebrews and the restric- 
tions that limit their residence to certain 
"pales," there is a united sentiment among 
the latter to seek other places of habita- 
tion, the United States offering the most fa- 
vorable conditions for settlement. It is ex- 
pected therefore that the exodus of the Jews 
will increase from year to year. 



BRITISH MERCHANT MARINE. 



A parcel-post convention between the 
United States and Hungary went into effect 
on July 1, 1910. Parcel-post packages ex- 
changed between the countries must not ex- 
ceed $80 in value, weigh more than 11 
pounds, nor measure more than 3 feet 6 
inches in length and 6 feet in length and 
girth combined. The rate of postage on 
such parcels is 12 cents for each pound or 
fraction of a pound. 



The British Government has issued a Blue 
Book showing the progress of merchant 
shipping in the United Kingdom and the 
principal maritime countries, the latest com- 
plete figures being for 1908. In that year 
the total British and foreign steam tonnage 
in cargo and in ballast which was entered 
and cleared in the foreign trade at ports in 
the United Kingdom was 126,975,747. 
against 128,470,870 in 1907. The propor- 
tion of British steam tonnage was 60.5 per 
cent., compared with 62.5 per cent, in 1907. 
The percentage of Briti-sh tonnage has 
shown a steady decline since 1870. 

An interesting table .shows the continued 
predominance of British ships in trade with 
the United States. Up to the year 1860 the 
United States merchant marine enjoyed by 
far the larger pari of this trade, but in 1908 
out of a total tonnage entered and cleared 
in the United Kingdom of 16.131,750 the 
tonnage of British vessels was 12,399.479, 
and of the United States vesels only 925,275. 

Excluding vessels registered at Shanghai 
the total amount of tonnage on register in 
the British Empire has shown a steady prog- 
ress since 1850, the first year given ; the 
total rose from 4.232,962 in that year to 8,- 
447.171 in 1880. 10.751.392 in 1900, 12.332,- 
404 in 1905. and 13.263,354 in 1908. It is 
stated that owing to the different scales of 
registration adopted by different nations, no 
trustworthy comparison is possible with the 
growth of the merchant navies of other na- 
tions. 



LABOR'S KONOMIC PLATrORM. 



COOPERATIVE INSURANCE. 



An important life insurance amalgama- 
tion has been announced, namely, that of 
the ^Mutual Life and Citizens Company and 
the Australian Widows' Fund. The direc- 
tors of the Australian Widows' Fund pro- 
pose to go into voluntary liquidation to en- 
able them to sell their business and under- 
taking to the Mutual Life and Citizens. The 
liquidator has power to transfer the busi- 
ness on the following terms : The Mutual 
Life and Citizens undertakes to manage 
the business at 10 per cent, of the premium 
income and to allow the Widows' Fund to 
share in all profits from new business. Any 
profit must be restricted to the difference 
between the actual cost to it and the 10 per 
cent, allowed by the agreement, and that 
profit, and more along with it, will no doubt 
be put into the purchase of extra new busi- 
ness. The agreement also provides for the 
election by the Widows' Fund policy hold- 
ers of a body of trustees to safeguard their 
interests. Provision is also made for audi- 
tors and actuaries. The new company will 
l)e run on cooperative lines, as distinguished 
from mutual or proprietary. 



LACE-MAKING IN VENICE. 



Wiiilc the price of labor in the Venetian lace 
industry rose during 1909. Consul John Q. 
Wood says many girls, upon graduating from 
the Italian lace schools, have been tmable to 
find employment. Compelled by actual need 
to work at lace-making, these girls have sold 
laces to the merchants at one-half the price of 
production. The total export of this article 
for the year has been about $750,000. The 
lace industry employs about 6,000 girls in and 
around Venice, 2.000 of whom are employed 
bv one firm. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. Tlie abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. friability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interest for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Cov- 
er nmentPostalSa\nngsBank^ 

INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Continneil from I'ncre 5.) 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cat. 44-10 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOU\'ER, B. C. 122 Alexander St.. P. O. Box 
UGH. 

TACOMA. Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE, Wash., 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash.. 114 Quincy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

AFiERMEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND. Ore., .51 Union Ave. 

ET'REKA. C.nl., 227 First St., P. O. Box 327. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

MONOLULf. H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts.. 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. fll Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408V4 Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. .11 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 209-210 Powell Building, P. O. 
Box 1335. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORI.A., Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABRROErC.N'. Wash.. P. f). Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN. Wasli. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
I'ETEUSBURG, Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION, 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SE\TTLE Wash.. 1312 Western Ave.. P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA.' Ore., P. C). Box 138. 

BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATMEN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FR.\NCISCO. Cal.. M Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO. Cal., 200 M St. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procuroil by seamen at 
any of ihe above-niPntlnnod places: 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OP AUSTRALASU 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



HOW THE CHINESE CAME. 



The success of the sugar industry in Ha- 
waii was founded on the old vicious system 
of contract labor, most of the plantation 
hands prior to annexation being Chinese, 
who were brought to the Islands under con- 
tract to work for a certain number of years. 
They worked then for wages which would 
now, even in the Territory where the price 
of a man's toil is all too little, be consid- 
ered infinitesimal. 

But the annexation of Hawaii to the Uni- 
ted States in 1898 extended to the Islands 
the Chinese Exclusion Act, as well as the 
contract-labor laws, and the planters' chief 
supply of labor was shut off. The sugar 
planters profited by annexation in that their 
sugar was admitted to the States duty free, 
but they immediately faced a serious labor 
problem, a problem which they are still try- 
ing to solve. 

The first Chinese came to Hawaii as far 
back as 1789, as a member of the crew of the 
Eleanor, which vessel touched at the Islands 
of Maui and Hawaii. At the time of Van- 
couver's third and last voyage, Tn 1794, the 
entire non-native population of the Sand- 
wich Islands consisted of John Young, Isaac 
Davis, a Mr. Boid, seven renegade whites 
and one Chinese. 

From that time on the number of Chinese 
in the Islands rapidly increased. They ac- 
quired a foothold and some of them were 
admitted to citizenship as early as 1842. By 
18.S2 forty-five Chinese had become citizens 
of the Kingdom of Hawaii. 

The first assistance of immigration to Ha- 
waii occurred in 1865 when 199 male Chi- 
nese, forty-three women and eight children, 
recruited by William Hillebrand, Royal 
Commissioner of Immigration, arrived in 
the Islands. By the terms of the contract 
into which they had entered, they were to 
have free passage to the Islands, lodgings, 
food, clothing, medical service — and the 
enormous wage of four dollars a month. As 
a special favor their masters allowed them 
Sundays off and three Chinese holidays a 
year. They were contracted to serve five 
years, at the end of which time they were 
to be allowed to return home if they wished. 

But, as a matter of fact, few of them were 
able to go home at the end of their five 
years' contract. Though nominally free 
men working for a wage, they were virtually 
slaves. If they wearied of their work in 
the fields and ran away from the plantations, 
they were pursued like criminals by the po- 
lice and when caught, as they usually were, 
they were punished by being made to serve 
their masters for a longer term of years. 
They were not infrequently encouraged to 
get into debt at the plantation stores and 
were then compelled to work out the debt 
by longer service — at four dollars a month. 
So that in many cases there was no more 
chance for them to return to China than if 
they had actually been bought at a slave 
auction, as were the blacks of the South in 
ante-bellum days. It was peonage, pure and 
simple. 

But this beautiful system came to an end 
in 1898 when Hawaii became a part of the 
United States. The days of easy and cheap 
labor were ended, and the planters had to 
look elsewhere than to China for their field 
hands. 

At the time of annexation there were in 
the Islands about 29,000 Chinese — to be ex- 
act, 25,742 males and 3,465 females. Though 
there had been many children born of Chi- 



nese in Hawaii, the number has for a decade 
been gradually decreasing through the re- 
turn of the Celestials to their own country. 
Yet the Chinese still play an important 
part in the life of the Islands. Usually hon- 
est, industrious and thrifty, many of them 
are wealthy while none are poverty-stricken. 
They have displaced the native Hawaiians 
as tillers of the soil, and though many are 
still working for the plantations, a large pro- 
portion are independent market gardeners 
or merchants and mechanics. Those who 
were citizens of the Kingdom became, by 
virtue of the Organic Act, citizens of the 
Territory, and they and the younger gener- 
ation of Chinese born in the Islands very 
eagerly exercise the right of franchise. — 
Edward P. Irwin, in the October Pacific 
Monthly. 



BIRDS' NESTS INDUSTRY. 



P>irds' nests form a unique item in the ex- 
port trade of Siam, the shipments during 
the fiscal year 1909 amounting to 17,781 
pounds, valued at $109,848, most of which 
were taken by China, Hongkong, and Singa- 
pore. 

These edible nests are found in the islands 
off the coast of Siam and are the products of 
a species of birds belonging to the family of 
swifts. The nests consist almost entirely 
of salivary secretion of these birds, whose 
salivary glands arc much more developed 
than those of the ordinary swift. The sea- 
son for the gathering of the nests begins 
in April and ends in September. 

The female bird, occasionally assisted by 
the male, makes the nest. About three 
months arc spent by the birds in completing 
tlieir first nest, which is taken by the nest 
gatherer before eggs are laid in it; then the 
birds immediately begin to make another 
nest, which is finished in about thirty days 
and which is also taken. Finally, a third 
nest is made in about three months, in which 
the bird is allowed to rear its offspring, after 
which this nest is also gathered. Each fam- 
ily of birds thus furnishes three nests in one 
season. The nests taken at the beginning 
of the season are considered the best in 
quality. 

Mostof the edible nests are consumed by 
the Chinese, who regard them not only as a 
great table delicacy, but also as a valuable 
tonic medicine in neurasthenia and pul- 
monary disorders. It is said that the de- 
mand in Hongkong for the nests exceeds the 
supply, and that the prices range from $15 
to $25 per pound, according to quality. 



IMPORTING A POPULATION. 



TURKISH PUBLIC UTILITIES. 



Ambassador Oscar Strauss sends from 
Constantinople a translated copy of a new 
"Law of Concessions," recently passed by 
the Turkish Parliament. It is intended to 
apply to public utilities as distinguished 
from concessions governing mines and 
quarries, commercial, agricultural, industrial 
and financial enterprises. The copy of the 
law is filed for public reference in the Bu- 
reau of Manufactures. 



The Venezuelan Congress is studying a law 
requiring the teaching of temperance and hy- 
gienic and other effects of alcoholism on the 
human system in the public schools. 



The semaphore service at Flores Island 
is to be extended to include all commercial 
information. 



It was long ago demonstrated conclu- 
sively by experiment that no good can re- 
sult from an attempt to fuse the blood of 
the white man with that of the yellow and 
the brown. Yet the sugar planters of Ha- 
waii, while talking enthusiastically about 
the Americanization of the Territory, have 
filled it up with Chinese and Japanese, Porto 
Ricans, Portuguese, Spaniards, Filipinos 
and Russians, and would have the rest of 
the conmiunity believe that from this mix- 
ture of incompatibles they can concoct an 
American citizenship worthy to rank with 
the citizenship of other communities. 

It may even be true that the majority of 
the immigrants brought to Hawaii turn out 
to be peaceable, law-abiding home-builders 
who really desire to work for the prosperity 
of the country. But they are not American 
in color, ideas, ideals or customs. For the 
most part they remain Portuguese, Span- 
iards, Filipinos, Porto Ricans, Japanese — 
whatever they were when their passages to 
Hawaii were paid by a beneficent govern- 
ment or charitable sugar-planters' associa- 
tion. And the fact that there is compara- 
tively little intermarriage among the vari- 
ous races, though a disproof of the beautiful 
theory of those idealists who believe that 
all men are brothers and should marry with 
their brothers' sisters of whatever race, 
color or previous condition of servitude, is 
probably the chief redeeming feature of 
Hawaii's assisted immigration work as now 
carried on. Miscegenation is not looked 
upon with favor in other American com- 
munities and there appears no good reason 
why it should be considered good for Ha- 
waii. 

Yet if the various races do not coalesce, 
how is it possible to make one people of 
them? The Territory of Hawaii, therefore, 
is impaled on the horns of a dilemma — a 
most uncomfortable situation, to put it 
mildly. 

For decades the planters have been pay- 
ing a labor wage upon which a white man 
would starve, and it goes sadly against the 
grain with capital to raise wages. The 
planters say they cannot afford to pay 
higher wages than they now pay — yet Ewa 
plantation in 1909 netted approximately 
$1,000,000. The plantation could have paid 
every one of its field and mill hands double 
the wages that were paid and still would 
have cleared many hundreds of thousands 
of dollars. The Hawaiian Commercial and 
Sugar Company cleared during the year 1909 
a million and a half dollars — yet could not 
afford to pay its laborers a fair wage. The 
plantations on the Island of Kauai netted 
over a million and three-quarters dollars-— 
but when the question of increasing wages 
was brought up the planters held up their 
hands in horror and had terrible visions of 
imminent bankruptcy. — Edward P. Irwin, in 
the October Pacific Monthly. 



The spring mackerel fisliery along the 
Nova Scotia and Newfoundland coasts up 
to the middle of July has been practically a 
failure, and unless the summer and fall rains 
are better than usual it will be a very un- 
satisfactory season all through. Those 
prominently identified with the fishing in- 
dustry say that they have never known the 
spring rain to fail so completely. The catch 
did not amount to more than one-fourth of 
that of last year. 



I2 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



News from Abroad. 



Telegrams have been received from 
all the Portuguese colonies expressing 
adherence to the republic. 

M. Wynmalen, a Dutch aviator, re- 
cently ascended to a height of 9121 
feet, breaking the altitude record, at 
Mourmelon, France. 

Count Ehrensvard, Swedish Minis- 
ter to Belgium, has been appointed 
Minister to Washington in succession 
to M. Lagercrantz, resigned. 

Advices from Lisbon say the new 
Republican Government of Portugal 
has declared its intention not to seize 
the private property of King Manuel. 
King George's coronation risks are 
already being weighed by big business 
firms and others to whom its possible 
postponement might involve financial 
loss. 

One hundred and fifty miners arc 
reported entombed and possibly dead 
in a mine at Palau, near Musquez, 
Coahuila, Mexico, as a result of two 
explosions. 

Sir T. Vezy Strong, the newly 
elected Lord Mayor of London for 
the year beginning November 9, is de- 
clared to be the first teetotaler ever 
elected to that office. 

Admiral Boue de Lapeyre, French 
Minister of Marine, has ordered the 
rearrangements of the superstructure 
of the torpedo depot ship La Foudre, 
for the accommodation of aeroplanes. 
Charles Bright, a London financier, 
is on his way to New York to let con- 
tracts for the projected $18,000,000 
Pan-American railroad, which will 
connect four capitals of South .Amer- 
ica. 

The Novoc Vremya of St. Peters- 
burg reports that Evno Azcf, decribed 
both as the head of the fighting Rus- 
sian Socialists and as a political police 
spy, has been assassinated at Wies- 
baden. 

The Rome correspondent of La 
Liberte says that a consistory has 
been definitely fixed for November 21, 
when Pope Pius will name twelve 
Cardinals, of whom ten will be Ital- 
ians and two Frenchmen. 

King Frederick of Denmark, on 
October 3 received Booker T. Wash- 
ington and conversed at length with 
him on the subject of the negro race. 
His majesty asked the .'\merican for 
a copy of one of his publications. 

A revolution took place in Portugal 
on October 4, resulting in the capture 
of Lisbon and the declaration of a re- 
public. King Manuel fled to Gibral- 
tar. Theophile Braga has been an- 
nounced as President of the republic. 
Diplomatic relations between Vene- 
zuela and Colombia, which were re- 
cently severed because of a boundary 
dispute, have been restored. Presi- 
dent Gomez on October 3 ofificially 
received Dr. Torres as Colombian 
Minister to Venezuela. 

An interesting Scandinavian peace 
celebration is being prepared for, four 
years in advance. By 1914 a century 
of peace among the Scandinavian na- 
tions will have been completed, and 
half a century of immunity from oper- 
ations of war outside their borders. 

The German Imperial Chancellor, 
Dr. von Bethmann-Hollweg, has sent 
a letter to the Foreign Correspon- 
dents' Association expressing regrets 
at the Moabit incident, in which sev- 
eral correspondents were assaulted by 
the police while watching riots, and 
informing the association that the 
matter is under investigation by the 
l\Iinister of the Interior. 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 




Established 1888. 

Consular Building, Corner Waihlngton and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

Oldest School on Pacific Coast. Largest 
and best equipped private Nautical School In 
the United States. Graduates prepared for the 
American and British Merchant Marine exam- 
inations. Warrant officers of the United States 
Navy prepared for examination for commis- 
sion officers. Special course for cadets enter-i 
ing the United States Naval Academy. 

Personal instruction by Captain Henry Tay- 
lor, M. A., Compass Adjuster. Certified In- 
structor, Passed Master, Proctor in Admiralty, 
Counselor at Law and competent to give legal 
advice on all matters, including Naturalization. 

WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHOLESALE Sole Agents for RETAIL 

The McCormack System of Fine Tailoring 

McCORMACK BROS. 

Importers, Jobbers and Retailers 

MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, CAPS, BOOTS AND SHOES 
TRUNKS, VALISES AND NOTIONS 



812-814 FIRST AVENUE, Opp. Colman Block 



BEATTLE, Wash. 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



NEVER HAD A FAILURE 



11 COLMAN DOCK 



SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opp. Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 






Headquarters For 



Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 

At 

WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 
220 and 222 First Avenue, South 
Branch Store - - 1335 Third Avenue 

sp:.\ttle, \v.\sh. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St., 

Seattle, Wash. 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 
Undertakers 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No, 13. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Jose Alonzo and Cha,s. Domingo, 
marine firemen, and Antoine Silvia 
and Jose Rcqueiva, oilers, are re- 
quested to leave addresses with E. A. 
Erickson, 1st Patrolman, care of 
Sailors' Union. 

Any one knowing whereabouts of 
Harry Fields, sometimes called Mar- 
tin Smith, kindly report to F. Ascher, 
1817 Chapin street, Alameda, Cal. 

P. J. Bertlcsen, winchman; J. Berg, 
V. Erickson, Olaf Kjellman, L. Linde- 
bcck, Theadore Yunther and M. C. 
Rasmussen, seamen; F. H. Sullivan, 
steward; W. Kidd, cook; J. Cote and 
Ed. McNellis. firemen, and G. Lina- 
nans, galleyman, on the steam- 
schooner Washington at the time she 
picked up the Minnie E. Kelton. 
Please call on F. R. Wall, 1209 Mer- 
chants' Exchange. 






Candidates for Mas- 
ters' and Mates' Ocean 
or Coast Licenses of 
all Grades are In- 
structed In the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
Navigation In all Its 
Branches, and in the 
Arithmetic of Navi- 
gation in a Clear and Intelligent Manner. 
By CAPT. W, J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical (College; 
Ocean Steamship Master. Unlimited; 
Piieet Round and Alaska Pilot; Author of 
"Self Instructor In Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practice, etc. 

MARITIME BLDG. (Fifth Floor), 
911 Western Avenue. 
Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



K. R. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



My work Is my best advertisement. 

W. H. MIDDLETON 
TAILOR 

A. H. ANDERSON, CUTTER 

Custom Tailors' Union Label In every 

Garment. 

519 THIRD AVENUE 

Three Doors South of James, SEATTLE. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outside of Union Office 

Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle, Wa»h., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mail forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mail until arrival. 

Albrlgtsen, G. J. Kalnow, A. 

Allen, J. Keenan, Fred 
Anderson. Einor ChrKenny, J. 
Anderson. John -1534Kieso"w, P. 

Anderson, Alf. Kronsbrand, H. O. 

Andersen, Andrew Larsen, Claus 

Apps. P. Latz, Konstanz 

Armstrong, W. H. Lewis. Geo. H. 

Bausman. E. -1511 Lindegard, J. 

Benson, F. -1765 Lundberg, C. 
Berg, Edmund -1312Lunder, Bjorn 

Berge. Johan Lundgren, C. J. 

Berenken, A. Lui, Theo. 

Bianca. F. -1661 Mattson, E. M. 

Botherel, A. Martin, Chr. 

Bryning, Walter McAdam. J. 

Brown, I, Miller. James 

Carlson, Harold Mikkelson, M. -1581 

Carlson, G. -622 Morgan, Ed. 

Christensen, Peter Moore J M 
Christoffersen. Her-Monson, Andrew 

„,'°' Nielsen, N. A. -909 

Christensen, Otto Nielsen, Martin 

,^-lrl2 Nielsen, M. A. 

Davidson, Jacob Nobereit, Gustaf 

Doll, Herman Nord, G. E. C. 

Dxeyer. Herman Olsen, Oscar, -1062 

Llfstrom, A. Olsen. S. 

Erikson, Allan Olsen, Gabriel 

Eskola, Henry Olsen, Valdimar 

Pernandoez, A. Olsen, B. -597 

Fianzell, A. Olsson. John H. 

Friv-ald, John Olsen. Hans 

Fredrickson, B. Omundson, Harry . 

trose. Ellas Paterson, Robert 

German, R. B. Pedersen, Olaf 

Grandal, Harry Pederson, A. -1173 

Gronburg. Theodor Peterson, A. -1223 

Gustav, John Petterson, C. W. 

Hansen. John P. Penningrud, Ludon 

aakonsen, H. Porje, Anton 

J ass, Wilhelm Randle, Dave 

[lan.sen, Hans Chr. Ruzner, Ernest 

Hansen. Andrew Rickardson, Adam 

Ilarjes. H. -1940 Rimmer, J. 

Ha tness, M. .Schmidt, Alfred 

llellisen, H. Selander, John 

Henriksen, Adolf Shane J 

ileinonen, H. Shallow, J. 

Hillig, Alb. Smith, Max 

Holmes, Paddy Speller, Harry 

Holmes, Gus Svensson, A. -1691 

Jensen, Hans Swenson, L. G. 
Johansen, C. M.-1593Tallopon, A. -721 

Johansen, Olaf K. Williamson A 

Johnson, Bernard Zagan J 

Johnson, Chali Zeisler A 

Johnsen, C. J. Zima, W. 
Jorgenson, J. 



ItUiiilKA. CAjL 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO., 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers In Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE. 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F. 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H, WENGORD. Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



.Anders Peter Andersen, a native of 
Denmark (Bogo), aged about 42, is 
inquired for by his sister. Address 
Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart 
street. 

Wilhelm Mahsing, last heard of as 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is inquired 
for by his brother, John Mahsing, 
now sailing out of New Orleans. Ad- 
dress, Marine Firemen's Union, 514 
Dumaine St., New Orleans, La. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal 

A. R. .\BRAHAMSEN. Prop. 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 



532 Second Street, 



Eureka, Cal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT 


BROS. 


JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 


WATCHES AND 

Cor. of HERON 
ABERDEEN, 


JEWELRY 

& G STS. 

WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, 
Groceries and Notions. 

We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 
320 S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service. 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Ow/ner of "The Red Front." 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO 

(U. 8. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Closes at 6 p. m.; Saturday* at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE TACOMA, WASH. 




McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 
Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively In Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 

around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(fncorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealert In 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Pres. 

PORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wa«h. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf, 

Port Tow/nsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer in 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
:n5 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



C. J. SWANSON 

Clothier and Furnisher for 
Gentlemen 

Up-to-date Suits Made to Order 

Hats, Caps, Shoes, Oilskins and 

Rubberboots 

Bedding, Blankets and Pillows 

Uniform gold braids and gold wreaths 
of all descriptions 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Washington 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phone Douglas 1082 

Home Phone C-3486 



OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

H. I. MALLEK 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Men's Outfitters, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, Flannel Shirts, 
Quilts, Blankets, and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road" and "Can't Bust 'Em" Overalls, 7Bc; Hickory Shirts, BOc. 
Everything Union made. 

I will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 

Remember the place, one block north of Union Hall, 2320 N. 80th St., Old Town. 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, etc. 
ROSENSTEIN BROS. 
23 N. Third Street, near Burnslde 

Portland, Oregon. 



WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For yuick Service Call East 4441 
Residence Phone Tabor 3 
1 give you a Claim Check for your bag- 
gage at home. Give me your work 
or we both lose money. 
Office: 
23 UNION AVENUE - - Portland, Ore. 



CJBflBUST'EJl 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 




FOR A MAN 

The Way to be Weil- 
Dressed is to Wear 
Thoroughly Good 
Clothes — Like Wood's 

A new batch of Pure Wool, 
Well-Lined, Hand-Tailored 
Suits for FALL and EARLY 
WINTER wear are here for 
your benefit. 

Union Made ^][5 ^^^^^^^^^^ 
S. N. Wood & Co. 

Market and 4th Sts., San Francisco 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Fritz Schmalkuche, who in March 
last was employed on board the Amer- 
ican schooner Endeavor, bound for 
.San Pedro, is inquired for by the 
German Consul, 201 Sansome street, 
San Francisco. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE SCANDINAVIAN STORE 



717 



Hall 



Pacific Ave. Near City 

B. OLSON, Proprietor. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes, Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



30S!3«AD 







OVERALLS 

DEMAND THE BRAND 



Neustadter Bros. 

5AN FRANCISCO NEW YORK PORTLAND 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

John Ferdinand Petterson Franken, 
a native of Finland, is inquired for. 
Address Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Robert Fordyce Bowers, last heard 
of at San Francisco, in March, 1907, 
is requested to communicate with his 
mother Mrs. M. E. Watson, of 12 
Lampton street, Bishopswearmouth, 
Sunderland, England. 

Joseph Flinn, last seen in Los An- 
geles and San Francisco, Cal., is in- 
(|uired for by his sister, Marie, and 
brother-in-law, John O. Breien, of 
Liverpool, England. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify John 
O. Breien, 4 Conti St., Mobile. Ala. 

Carl Leopold Anderson, native of 
Nordtelje, Sweden, last heard from in 
New Orleans, La., November, 1904, is 
inquired for by his brother John An- 
derson. Address: Sailors' Union, San 
P'rancisco, Cal. 

John Johnson, a native of Norway, 
born September IS, 1858. at Blegc- 
leidet Bamle; last heard from in 1904 
living at 230 Third street, San Fran- 
cisco. Any one able to give any in- 
formation kindly communicate with 
his nephew, M. Olsen, Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Wilhelm Pemoeller, a ship's car- 
penter, who was discharged from the 
German sailing vessel Nordsee on Feb- 
ruary 14, 1908, and Johs. Herm. Ditz, 
a machinist, who left the German 
steamship Arabia in September of last 
year, are inquired for by the German 
Consulate at Portland, Qreson. 



The population of Cohoes, N. Y., is 
24,709, compared with 23,910 in 1900. 

President Taft celebrated his fifty- 
third birthday at Beverly, Mass., on 
September IS. 

The population of Joliet, 111., is 
34,670, an increase of 5317 or 18.1 per 
cent, as compared with 29,353 in 1900. 

The population of Racine, Wis., is 
38,002, an increase of 8900, or 30.6 per 
cent, as compared with 29,102 in 1900. 

Mayor Gaynor of New York re- 
sumed tlie duties of his office on 
October 3 for the first time since the 
attempt to assassinate him, on August 
9. 

Jail sentences are to be imposed 
hereafter on travelers who seek to 
evade the Customs law. Offenders 
caught smuggling recently have been 
heavily fined and let ofT. 

W. T. Vernon, the negro Register 
of the Treasury, soon will hand his 
resignation to President Taft. The 
appointment will go to J. C. Napier 
of Nashville, Tenn., also a negro. 

Thirty-seven persons were killed 
and from sixteen to twenty-five were 
injured in a collision on the Illinois 
Traction System two miles north of 
Staunton, 111., on October 4. 

Dr. Frederick A. Cook has been 
found in London. He is reported as 
saying that he will yet prove that he 
discovered the North Pole, and hopes 
to return to New York shortly. 

New Mexico's constitutional con- 
vention convened in the Hall of Rep- 
resentatives at Santa Fe on October 3. 
I'^ormer Delegate to Congress Thoinas 
n. Catron called the convention to 
order. 

Aviator Walter Brookins on Sep- 
tember 29, alighted in the fair grounds 
at Springfield, 111., seven hours and 
twelve minutes out of Chicago, after 
having sailed his Wright biplane the 
187 miles with two stops. 

By an order issued by the Post- 
office Department on October 5 land 
grant railroads hereafter will receive 
only $15.39 for each 200O pounds of 
mail carried in excess of 48,000 
pounds. The old rate was $17.10. 

President Taft has accepted the 
resignation of Associate Justice Wil- 
liam H. Moody of the United States 
Supreme Court, to take effect on 
November 20. In retirement, Justice 
Moody will receive full pay of $12,000 
a year. 

In the United States Court at Au- 
burn, N. Y., J. Howard Lowery, the 
defaulting assistant cashier of the 
Utica City National Bank, pleaded 
guilty and was sentenced to twenty 
years in the Federal penitentiary at 
Atlanta, Ga. 

The first appearance of a Japanese 
in a New York divorce court has just 
licen recorded. The decree orders 
John Sa Su, a Japanese tailor, to pay 
Iiis wife $700 a year for the support of 
herself and their four children. The 
wife is an English woman. 

Cornell University at Ithaca, N. Y,, 
is to erect a memorial tablet in Gold- 
win Smith Hall in honor of the late 
Professor Goldwin Smith, upon which 
will be inscribed a copy of the clause 
in his will bequeathing more than 
$600,000 unconditionally to Cornell. 

Associate Justice John M. Harlan 
presided over the United States Su- 
preme Court when it met on October 
10. He is senior Associate Justice and 
as such will act as the Chief Justice 
until the successor to the late Chief 
Justice Fuller is nominated and con- 
firmed. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Besides Great Britain, the countries 
which have old-age pensions are Den- 
mark, France, Belgium, Germany, 
New Zealand and Australia. 

Reports filed with the Pennsylvania 
State Railroad Commission show that 
97 people were killed on the steam 
railroads of the State in .\ugust and 
843 injured. 

Much indignation has been e.x- 
pressed at the police espionage of the 
delegates to the California State Fed- 
eration of Labor, which met in Los 
Angeles last week. 

Rewards amounting to over $100,000 
have been offered for the arrest and 
conviction of the Los Angeles Times 
dynamiters. This is said to be the 
largest sum ever offered in a similar 
case. 

The Panama Canal Commission re- 
ports that on August 31 there were 
35,867 employes actually at work on 
the Canal and the Panama Railroad, 
and of this number 29,950 were Canal 
employes. 

According to press reports, the 
Spanish miners' strike, which has 
been on for months past, has been 
ended through the mediation of the 
Captain-General. Work in the mines 
was resumed on September 22. 

Nine officials and one employe of 
the Delaware and Hudson Canal Com- 
pany, at Carbondale, Pa., were re- 
cently indicted for murder in connec- 
tion with the killing of James Cicone 
during the trackmen's strike riots last 
June. 

The number of Americans employed 
on the Panama Canal on .\ugust 31 
shows an increase of twenty-five over 
the report of July, and the total force 
employed is divided as follows: Rail- 
road, 3298; railroad relocation force, 
1603; railroad commissary force, 1016; 
Panama Canal force, 29,950. 

Both the lockout of ten unions of 
bricklayers and strikes of bricklayers 
at New York and throughout the 
country were called off on October 6, 
an amicable arrangement having been 
reached between the international of- 
ficers of the bricklayers and a com- 
mittee of the association. 

The eleventh annual convention of 
the California State Federation of La- 
bor concluded its work at Los Angeles 
on October 8. President D. D. Sulli- 
van and Secretary-Treasurer Paul 
Scharrenberg were re-elected. Bakers- 
field was chosen as the place of the 
next convention. 

President Gompers, of the .Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor, announces 
that arrangements have been made by 
the American Federationist for club 
rates with the labor papers on a basis 
of 60 cents per year for the Federa- 
tionist. Editors of labor papers are 
requested to take up this proposal. 

Mayor .Mexander, of Los Angeles, 
has refused to accept the services of 
a committee appointed by the con- 
vention of the California State Feder- 
ation of Labor for the purpose of aid- 
ing in the investigation of the Times 
explosion. The labor committee is 
conducting an independent investiga- 
tion. 

The British Board of Trade inter- 
vened on September 30 in an attempt 
to avert a lockout in the cotton in- 
dustry threatened for October 3. An 
official of the Board went to Man- 
chester to interview members of the 
Federation of Master Cotton Spin- 
ners and representatives of the em- 
ployes, and hoped to be able to ar- 
range a roundtable conference. 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for tliree 
montlis only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration o( four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Abrahamsen, -1263 
Adamsson, John 
Adamson. O. 
Airo, Oskar 
Altselsen. Altsel 
All)ertsen, Hans Chr. 
Albreclit, Emil 
Andersen, -1310 
Andersen, Albin 
Andersen. Carl 
Andersen. Carl Kmil 
Andersen, Hans K. 
Andersen, J. O. 
Andersen, -1620 
Andersen, A., -1653 
Bach, K. E. 
Bal<er, C. VV. 
Barney, Clias. 
Bartel, L. 
Barwa, David 
l?;izer, Gorta 
Beclt, Jolin A. 
Behrens, Otto 
Bende, Adolf 
Bendixen. Nic 
Berg, Edmund 
Berg, Mickel 
Bergstrom. Axel 
Bernard, S. 
Berntsen. Eilert 
Birdie, W. G. 
Bjorklund. Erik 
Bla<k, Vktor 
Carlsen, Jakob 
Carlson, Harry 
Carlson, Harvey 
Carlson, Julius 
Carlson, Richard 
t,':nlstrom, A. 
Cassen, Harry 
Ceclan, John 
Ceolay. Tom A. 
Chaier, B. 
Chandler, P. L. 
Chevalier, Vincent 
Dahlnian, Axel 
Dalilstrom, -749 
Uaumgold. Ernest 
Day, Harry E. 
De Haan, G. A. 
Dinunerninks, F. 
Doense, J. 
I-'genas, Nels 
Kggelhotf. Fred 
Eklund, David 
Eliasen, J. A. 
I'^lling.sen, Edward 
EUingsen, J. W. 
Elonen, M. H. 
Fagerholm, Carl 
Faulkner. John B. 
Feeley, Tom 
Felix, Hans 
Fischer, Peter 
Foley. J. J. 
Forvik, Olaf 
Foss, Laurits 
Gasman, Geo. A. 
German. K. B. 
Gibbs, Harry 
Gilholm. Allen 
Godorog, Vasale 
Gonzalez, J. 
Graugaard. L. 
Gravier, Eugene 
Green, William 
Gronman, -456 
Grunbel, Gustav 
Grunwald, Alfons 

Haering, Waiter 
Hagen, Carl L. 
Hageli, Torvald 
Halvorsen, Anton 
Halvorsen, Severin 
llamniinargren 
Hannus, A. 
Hansen. H. O. 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, C. O. 
Hansen. -2085 
Hansen, Adolph 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, Ragnvald 
Hansen, -2060 
Hansen, Einar A. 
Hansen. Emanuel 
Hansen. Henry E. 
Hansen, H. P. 
Hansen, H. M. 
Hansen, H. J. 
Hannus, A. 
lacksson, Karl 
Idog, Chas. 
Ingerbertsen, O. E. 
Jacobsen, Ole 
Jakobsen, J. E. 
Jamieson. ,1. E. 
.Tansclioritz. John 
Jensen. -2014 
Jensen, I. M. 
Jensen, Oscar 
Jensen, M. C. 
Jensen. N. O. 
Jensen, A. 
Jensen, Olof NiU 
Jensen, -1987 
Johansen, .^xel 
Johansen, Clias. 
Johannsen, Peter 
Johansen, Alex 
Job.ansen, A. F. 
Johansen, Matlilas 

Kallas, Aug. 
Karlsen, John A. 
Kailsson, Josef 
Karlsson, R. 
Knrlsson. Gus. Robt. 
Karlsson, Gust. 
Kaspersen, O, Chr. 
Kaus, L. 
Kavanagh. Jas. 
Kelly. John 
Kerlean, Alex 
Kibi, John 
Kiel, P. 
Kiesel, A. C. 
Kinerman, Chas. 



Andersen, Ned. 
Andersen, Ole 
Anderson, -S22 
Anderson, Karl 
Anderson, Sven 
Andersson, Karl 
Andersson, Aug. 
Andreasen, Mogens 
Antonsen, Karl 
Anzine, Giuseppe 
Arenius, Geo. 
Arnesen, Isak 
Arnstrom. Julius 
Asp, Gustaf 
Aylward, James 
Blair, Francis 
Blank, Geo. 
Blecha, Alf. 
Bliesath, Max 
BlonKjuist, Chas. 
Boers, M. 
Boman, W. 
BoQuist, Chas. 
Brams, C. S. 
Bray, J. K. 
Bregler, Fred. 
Broden, Julius 
Bro.x, Henrik 
Bruce, Otto 
Brunwald, H. 
Bryde, C. M. 
Burke, James 
Burr, E. C. 
Christensen. E. H. 
Christensen, J. J. 
Christensen, M. H. 
Christoftersen, B. 
Chiistofferson, Alt. 
Clark, James 
Clausen. Elias 
('leissnian, Frank 
Conrad, Fritz 
Cooley, Howard 
Croschet, D. 
Cutler, Wm. 
Dolierty, Bob 
Dracar, Edgardo 
Drausman, Hans 
Dreger, Jack 
Dryger, Max 
Duff, Wm. 

Engebretsen, -125 
Eriksen, Edw. 
Eriksen, Ole 
Eriksson. Conrad 
Ericksson, Chas. 
Evans, B. 
Evanger, Nils 
Foyn. Sam 
Frank, Bernard 
Franknvic, A. 
Frandsen, Niels 
Fransson. Frank G. 
Frivald, John 
Furesson, Theo. 

Guerrero, Mrs. 
Guldberg, Randolf 
GiiUaksen, Hans 
Gunn, W. D. 
Gundersen, -899 
Gundersen, -785 
Gusjaas, Oskar 
Gustave, Garnier 
Gustafson, Frank 
Gustman, C. 
Gustafson, G. 
Gustafson, Oscar 

Harlow, H. A. 
Haug, Hans H. 
Hedinskoy, J. 
Hedvall, A. 
Heine, Mr. 
Helmros, G. 
Hengst, Otto 
Henning. August 
Henrv. Harrv 
Herdon, E. H. 
Heyne, Herman 
Heyne, H. 
HiUelam. A. 
Hinke. E. 
Hoffs, Henry 
Hogstedt, Charlie 
Hogstrom, .Vxel 
Holmberg. Olaf 
Holm, Johan 
Holstein, R. 
Hoye, Haakon 
Hunt, Gus 
Isaksen, Gunnar 



Joliansson, Carl 
Johansson, John 
Johansson, B. R. 
Johannesen, Artliur 
Johannsson, -2071 
Johnsen, Oscar 
Johnsson, Roy W. 
Johnsson, J. R. 
.Johnston, .1. A. 
Johnson, C. R. 
Johnson, Jas. K. 
Johnson, Emile 
.lohnson, Alf. 
Joiinson. -1597 
Johndahl, H. 
Jordfald. Theo. 
Jorgensen, Wm. 

Kissor 

Kjellgren, L. A. 
Knieling. John 
Knopf, Loviis 
Knudscn, Lars 
Kohlmeister, Otto 
Kolter, L. 
Kotserubie, Anton 
Krapp, E. 
Kristoffersen, Alf. 
Kristophersen. Jacob 
Krogstad, H. E. 
Kukuhskin. M. 
Kuhne, Karl 



I-ackey, C. H. 
Lahr, Otto 
Lankvist, John 
Larsen, Laurils P. 
Larson, Martin 
Larsen, Lars -1290 
Larsen, Oscar 
Larson, Soren 
Larson, l>ars M. 
Laws, J. B. 
Le Bloa, Sylvain 
Lehto, Emll 
Le Mai re 
Leroen, Lars 
Madsen, Th. 
Malmberg. Elis 
Maniers, Clias. 
Mansfield, Jack 
Martens, Hans 
Martin, H. 
Masterman, E. 
Matliisen, Herman 
Matre. Nels J. 
Matson, -1471 
Matthews, F. 
Matteson. J. A. 
Mattson. John M. 
McAvay, J. A. 
McLouglin, M. 
Nanjack, G. 
Nelson, Chas. M. 
Nelson, F. 
Nelson, Martin 
Nelson, John 
Nerbrugge, D. 
Newman, J. 
Nick, Peter 
Nielsen, N. C. 
Odland, B. B. 
Ohls. Johan 
Oistad, Hans 
Olafson, M. 
Olatuler, Karl 
L'linann, P. 
I'isen, -1112 
Olson. Ole, Chr. 
Olsen, Jens 
Olsen, Chas. 
Olsen, -995 
Olsen. Hans J. 
Olsen, -533 
Falmroth, J, 
Paulson, A. 
Pearson, W. H. 
Pearson, Bernard 
Pearsson, John L. 
Pedersen, Karl 
Pedersen, Johan 
Pedersen, Julius 
Pedersen, Henning 
Pemberton, Dave 
Petersen, H. C. 
Petersen, Carl 
Ramberg, Barney 
Kanak, Louis 
Rasmussen, Emil 
Ravall, J. E. 
Keay, Steve 
Reiner, Karl 
Reinhold, Ernst 
Kintzo, John 
Snarin, John 
Salvesen, Fred 
Samsig, Carl 
Sander, -1068 
Sanne, Rudolf 
Sandstrom, Ivar 
Sandstrom, O. H. 
Saul. 'ih. A. 
Schager, E. L. 
Schenberg, C. 
Schmehl, Jas. P. 
Sfhlai/hte, Alfred 
Sclievig, A. B. 
Schmalkuche, Fritz 
Schmidt, Hans 
Scholtens. Ben 
Schott, H. 
Schultnian, J. H. 
Schultman, Johan 
Schulz. Ernst 
Schelenz, Hant 
Schnell, Henry 
Schultz. Albert 
Sclander. Gus. 
Scott, E. G. 
Seagreen, John 
Seberg, C. 
S( hellenberg, H. 
Seiger, Joe 
Selander, Gus. 
Sharp, Fred 
Siem, C. 
Slnyard, W. 
Taylor, Wm. H. 
Telgland, Carl 
Tergesen, Tom 
Terwedow. Richard 
Thilo, Peder 
Thompson, Ch. 
Thomassen, Paul 
Thorsen. Otto E. 
Thureson, Arthur 
Vana. Olaf O. 
Vejvado, Frank 
Verbruzze, L. 
Vesta, Tom 
Vick, J. M. 

Wahlberg, Rudolph 
Wakroom, J. 
Wannkvist, E. 
Ward. H. 
Welsen, J. 
Welure, -1064 
Wenneck, A. 
Werner, Paul 
Westman, A. 
Wever, Carl 
Zagen, Geo. 
Zoisig, Johannes 



Lersten, J. O. 
Lind, Gus. 
Lindgren, Gustaf 
Lindberg, Ole 
Lindebach, L. 
Lindskog. Thor. O. 
Lotland, -2121 
Louis. Martin 
Luckman, E. 
Lude. Thorwald 
I^undgren, Hugo 
Lundqvist, Oscar 
Lundsberry. R. 
Lynch, -1586 
McBratney, Hugh 
Menz, Paul E. 
Merken, Christ 
Meyer, Raymond 
Mikkelsen, Axel 
Milas, Peter 
Miller, J. B. 
Mitcl)el, Alex 
Moe, John M. 
Moren, E. H. 
Morken, J. L. 
Morrison, Donald 
Morse, E. G. 
Mullen, Joseph 
Murphy, -1916 
Nielsen, -909 
Nielsen, H. J. 
Nielsen, -1037 
Nlit, P. 

Nilson, Edward 
Nord. G. E. 
Nordling, Sven 
Nylund, Hans J. 

Olsen, Nils 
Olsen, Olaf D. 
Olsen, Otto 
(Usen, Paulus 
Olsen, Olaf S. 
Olsen, W. 
Olsson. Ernest 
Osse, H. 

Oterbeck, Hans H. 
Ottenhausen, Carl 
Ouchterlony, Fred 
Owen, Fred 

Peterson, Frank V. 
Pet row. F. 
I'otterFon, Clias. 
Petterson, -1062 
Petterson. John B. 
Pierson. Andrew 
Plaskette, Mike 
Plottner. Alfred 
Post, Albert 
Prendel, L. 
Prenfs, F. 
Prescott, Richard 
Robeck, E. 
Robinet, Geo. 
Rosenwald. Isak 
Ross. Rudolf 
Ross. Wm. 
Rudberg, Chas. 
Runak, Hans 
Russell, Wm. 
Sjoberg, Johan 
Skjellerup, A. 
Skotheim. Sigurd 
Smith, Henry 
Smith, Jos. P. 
Soderlund. Anton 
Soetveit, G. 
Soderling, Axel 
Sonne, A. J. -2213 
Sorensen, -1664 
Sorensen, -1492 
Soto, Santos 
Stange, Anton 
Stangeland, P. B. 
Sterro, J. E. 
Stein, John 
Stewart, J. L. 
Stolzer. Aug. 
Stolt. A. J. 
Strand, Charley 
Strand, Olaf 
Stenfoes, G. 
Strom, C. 
Sunde Albert 
Sund. Alex 
Suominen, O. 
Svendsen, C. J. 
Svenson. Algot 
Sweeney, John 
Swenson, Edwin 
Swanson, Ims. 
Swanson, Martin 
Swanson. -21,S4 
Tonning. Christ 
Toroik, Olaf 
Torhjornsen. O. 
Torkildsen, Marins 
Tornquist. S. 
Tranim. Hans 
Trentani, Louis 
Tscheekar, F. 
Tuft, Edw. 
Vister, Julius 
Von Vlies, P. 
Von Fyren, G. P. 
Vucic, V. 

Weyer, Paul 
Whalstedt, Alb. 
Wiad, H. I. 
Wiborg, John 
Wikstrom, Wm. 
\\'illponen. Edw. 
W'inkel, August 
Wisto, Julius 
Witol, H. 
Wolens, J. 
Zlmmerling, F. 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 



Andersen, -1609 
Anderson, Victor 
Andreasen, Hans 
Arrhenins, Geo. 
Rehrentz, C. 
Brandsten. Ernest 
Ciiristensen, Chris- 
ten 



Christansen, N. 
Damiano, Alex. 
1 )yeness, L. E. 
Eckort. W. F. 
Gustafson, K. O. 
Hansen, -1229 
Hardmere, C. 
Hengst, Otto 



Jensen, -1342 (llsen, G. 

Jensen, -2014 Pedersen, Chas. 

Johansen, Niel -207lPedersen. Karl 
Johanson, -1677 Petersen, N. -7S2 

Johannessen, -1863 Peterson. Henning 
Kaald, John Purdy, W. G. 

Klrst, Hans Rlgnell, Eric 

Larsen, Anton Russell, W. 

I^ackey, C. Sansing, Carl 

Larsen, Lars, -1290 Schager. E. L. 



Larson, G. A. 
Lewis, H. 
Plhpick, K. 
Lundman, Carl 
Martin, H. 
Martens, Hans 
Alatisen, Nils 
Mattler, Franz 



Slegurd, J. I. 
Stensland, Paul 
Strand, -1786 
Swanson, Martin, 

-2184 
Thompson, A. 
Torgersen, Kaspar 
Winclad, M. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Andreasen, O. L. 
Aken, Emil 
Asker, John 
Andersen, Oluf 
Andersen, J. -934 
Andersen. Sam 
Adman, O. 
Buth, Siegfried 
Brander, Wm. 
Boy, George 
Brandt, Nils 
Bensen, John 
Collins, F. 
Cooley, Howard 
Castel, J. 
Calson, Carl 
Comstock, Howard 
Cuttler. Wm. 
Davis, John 
Dirks, George 
De Cantes, M. 
Fisko, Oluf 
Faccet, Sam 
Gras, Charles 
Graves, Sam 
Granberg, Gus S. 
Hubner, H. 
Hall, Leonard 
Holmstrom, C. A. 
Holm, Carl 
Ilartman, Geo. 
Hansen, Ole 
Hanson, Henry 
llouser, Charlie 
Johnson, Andrew 
Jacobsen, G. -1092 
Isacson. Ch., -140 
Johanson, HJalmar 
Jarf, Kristian 
Jorgensen, Charles 
Johnson, C. -1315 
Jensen, Ingvalt, M. 
Johannessen, Josef 
Johanson, Fr. -2019 
Johanson, Teodor 
Johnson, R. W. 
Johnson, Carl, -1585 
Johnson, Julius 
Johansen, Herluf C. 
Jonasson Carl Axel 
Johnson, Frank 
Kose. Armin 
Karlson. Edvard 
Krumliiegei, Arthur 
Kuhme, Wm. 
Kimeral, Herman 
Kielman, Joe 
Koffer, Mark 
Klolen, Karl 
Lundberg, C. 
Lindblom, Ernst 
Larsen, George 



Lindholm, Chas. 
Llngberg, Oscar 
Larson, M. A. 
Lohtonen, John 
Lengwems, U. L. 
Lorentzen, Ernest 
Linquist, Gust 
Lorin, Martin 
Lind, Gust 
Miller, Otto 
Mattson, Karl 
Mattson, J, 
Neilson, A. O. 
Nurmi, Victor 
Nilson, Alfred 
Olsen, Ernest 
Olsen, E. A. 
Olsen, Carl 
Olsson, Carl G. -1101 
Olsen, Oswald, -1059 
Oscar, Carl 
Orten, Sigurd 
Olson, Wilhelm 
Olsen, John 
Olsen, Valler 
Olsen, Olaf O. 
Pedersen, Kristian 
Petersen, Oscar 
Poison, C. -641 
Pearson, Julius F. 
Pettersen, Wilhelm 
Pedersen, Hans Chr. 
Petersen, Oscar Fr. 
Petersen, A. G. -2404 
Prondberg, G. -1306 
Peratis, John 
Roswell. Gus. 
Rost, K. G. 
Rasmussen, N. G., 

-485 
Swanson, Martin 
Skoman, Chas. 
Sverstrup, B. F. 
Sparre, Don 
Schulter, Paul 
Schelenz, Karl 
Steversen, Charles 
Stevens, Scott R. 
Sorensen, Karl 
Svenson, Bernard 
Slegurd, Jushus T. 
Smith, J. V. 
Speckman, Max 
Thompson, Chas. 
Thorsen, Jens 
Uolby, Harold 
W'ishaar, E. B. 
Westnas, Ivar 
Wuorio, J. 
Veaal, G. 
Winters, C. 



Eureka, CaL, Letter List. 



Andersen, John 
Anderson, Olof 
Anderson, S. 
Armmi, Walter 
Blunt, H. 
Bostrom, C. 
Brown. C. L. 
Bryan, G. F. 
Christensen, Harvy 
Conaughton, H. 
Ekwall. G. A. 
Fors. Alfred 
Fraberg, Enock 
Goevyette, Joseph 
Grant, John 
Gunther, Theo. 
Gustafson. Edvard 
Horlin. Ernest 
Hollins, Frank 
Isaacson, Gustav 
Ivars, Carl 
Johanesen, Arthur 
Johnsen, J., -25 
Johnston, R. 
Karlson. Anders E. 
Klauson, Axel. 
Lombar, Ermino 
Lorensen, Org. C. 
Mlchaelsen, Johanes 



Micheli Agojtlno 
Niccolal, Sant 
Nilsen, R. 
Nilsen, O. 
Nordbiom, Ben. 
Nylund, Sven 
Olsen, Peder A. 
Olson, Bror, 
Olson, C. 
Oman, Victor 
Palomo, G. 
Pedersen, Martin 
Pedersen, Paul 
Pedersen, Peter 
Petterson, Aaskar 
Penney, Math. 
Salminen, K. W. 
Selander, Gustaf 
Shuils, Christ. 
Sjellman, Jonas 
Stienen, J. C. 
Svendsen, Olof 
Teigland. G. 
Thoresen, Petter 
Kalkman, Otto 
Walbreth, C&rl 
Wilsonn, John 
Yannie, C. 
Yulmky, Wm. 



Pt. Townsend Letter List. 



Bianea, F. 
Carsson, -1044 
Carlsen, H. G. 
Harmening, Fritz 
Jolinsen, Emil 



Liesmann, Fred 
Rosbeck, Gustav 
Schmidt, A., -938 
Simensen, Simon 
Tramm, Hans 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Alfred J. 
Bowers, Gust. 
Collins, E. F. 
Davey, Chas. 
Eishel, Erich, -740 
Fors. Alfred 
Hansen, Chas. 
Haug, Hans H. 
Kimeral. Herman 
Lewis, J. W^. 
Lowe, John A. 
Moorten, Louis 
Nelson, Fred 



Nelson, Nels B. 
Ness, John 
Olsen. Chas. 
Petterson, Knut L. 
Pettersen, Johan 
Reay, L. A. 
Renter. Ernest 
Robsham, Jens W. 
Lolberg, B. P. 
Thore, B. E. 
Ullman, Gustaf 
Vongehr, Edward 
Zellg, Gustav 



THE HARBOR HOTEL 

Formerly "The Mohawk" 

132 EAST STREET 

Opposite Ferry 

STEAM HEAT, HOT AND COLD 

WATER IN EVERY ROOM 



Elevator Service Free Baths 

and a Large Reading Room 

Rates: 

$2.00 PER WEEK AND UP 

35c PER DAY AND UP 

T. L. SELCHAU P. N. NANSEN 
Proprietors 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY -AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings (THE GERMAN BANK) CoRimercial 

(Member of the Assocuttcl Savings Baaks 
of Sao Franiisco.) 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital .... $ 1,200,000.00 
Capital actually paid up in cash S 1,000,000.00 
Keserve and Contingent Funds . .$ 1,555,093.05 

Deposits June 30th, 1910 40,384,727.21 

Total Assets 43,108,907.82 

Reiiitt-inoe may be made by draft, post office, or Wdla 
Far?) k 'o's moniy orde.-5, or coin by ex!>res.s. 

Ofiic^ Hours: 10 o'cloci A. 11. to 3 o'clock P. M., except 
Siturliva to 12 o'clock M. anl S.aturday Evenings from 
5.3) o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of deposits 
oqIv. 

OFFICERS— President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-Fres- 
Idjnt, Daniel Mcver; Second Vcc-Presidcnt and M inascr, 
G.wgeToumv; 'fhird Vice-President, J. W. Van H?rK;n; 
Casliier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier. Wil.iaMi 
Herrmann; Secretary, A. H. Mulhr; Assistant Sjcrclarics, 
G. J. O. Folte and Wm. D. Newhouse; Good.ellow & 
E.UsGneral Attornnys. 

liOAliD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, Daniel Mrycr, 
GeorRe Tcnjrnv, J. W. Van B.Tjen. Irjn. Stcinhart, I. N. 
Walter, F. Tiilmann, Jr., E. T. Krusu and \'\'. S. G' r 1- 
fellow. 

MISSION BR \NCH, 2572 Mission Street, between ?lst 
and 22nd Sts. For receipt and payment of Deposits only. 
C. W. H.V.T. Mana-jcr. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH. 432 Clement Street, 
b-'.we^n 5'h and 6-h Av^nu-s. For receipt and payment 
of deposits ooly. W. C. Heyer, Manager. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 Folsom street, near Third street 

Over 100, all sunny rooms to let; fur- 
nished up-to-date; electric lights; run- 
ning hot and cold water; batlis free. 
Rates, $1.75 to $3.00 per week; 25c to 
75c per day. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL, LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, oppo- 
site Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. 
Baths, Reading Room. Office open all 
night. Best place near waterfront. 
Investigate. 



Blue Diamond Havana Cigars are 
satisfactory because they are hand- 
made from imported Havana by com- 
petent union cigar makers — 2 for 25c 
—10c, 3 for 25c. 

THRANE BROS., Makers. 
46 East St., Under Union Headquar- 
ters and 1800 Market St. 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
109STEUARTST., SanFrancisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



THE EAGLE CIGAR STORE 

and Laundry Office 

HENRY BORNEMAN, Proprietor 

Give me a call for old time's sake 

229 EAST STREET 

Between Washington and Jackson Sts. 

San Francisco, Cal. 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 

We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Below 5th, near U. S. Mint and Emporium 

Phones: Kearny 1966; Home J-1966 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Nils Edmund Johnnsen, a native of 
Tansberg, Norway, aged about SO, last 
heard of at Melbourne, Australia, is 
inquired for by his brother. Address 
Martin Johansen, 839 Centennial ave- 
nue, Alameda. C.tI. 

Information is wanted from the 
crews of the barkciitinc S. N. Castle 
and the schooner John D. Spreckels 
in regard to the seizure of these ves- 
sels in the Okhotsk .Sea in 1907 by 
the Russian gunboat Madjur. Kindly 
call on Samuel Pond, First National 
Bank Building, San Francisco. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 



OF CALIFORNIA 



MARKET AND SANSOME STREETS 
Branches: C24 Van Ness Avenu* and 3039 Sixteenth Street 

Authorized Capital, $3,000,000. Capital Paid In, $1,500,000. 

Accounts of Individuals, firms, corporations and societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts at the rate of 4% per annum. 
Drafts and Letter* of Credit Issued, payable in all parts of the world. 
Chat. F. Leege, Pre«. W. A. Frederick, Vlce-Pres. B. G. TognazzI, Manager. 

Chas. C. Moore, Vice-Pres. 

Gavin McNab, Vlce-Pres. 



Domestic and Naval. 



SOMETHING NE^W 

The Antidote Pipe 

A POSITIVE 

NICOTINE 
DESTROYER. 

"ANTIDOTE," 
the Catalytic Pipe, 
has Four Impor- 
tant Advantages 
which can be found 
in No Other Pipe. 

1. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" needs No 
Breaking in. Ev- 
ery smoker knows 
the terrors of the 
first few smokes in 
an ordinary Pipe. 
The First Smoke in 
an "ANTIDOTPJ" 
is as sweet as 
an ordinary Pipe 
sweetened by Long 
Usage. 

2. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" can not 
burn out. The 
Catalytic lining 
protects the briar. 

3. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" Is always 
Dry even with con- 
stant smoking. 

4. The "ANTIDOTE " scientifically destroys the Nicotine, making it 
evaporate. A porous lining filled with Coal Tar Particles (Platinum, etc.) is 
placed in the bowl of a briar pipe, this is called the Catalyser; the smoke 
passing over the Catalyser produces Formol. This Formol turns all the 
moisture and Nicotine into steam, causing it to pass off into the air and 
evaporate. 

All "ANTIDOTE" Pipes are hand made, of the Best French Briar. 

KASSE:R BROS. 

Distributors 

19 MARKET STREET, S. E. Cor. Steuart, San Francisco, Cal. 

Pipe Repairing Our Specialty. 




SMOKERS 



See that this label (in light 
blue) appears on the box in 
which you are served. 



SS[PtJ8803i 

Issued by Autliofilyof tne Cigar MaKers' Intefnational Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

<JhiS (f fl1ifif:S. TW the Ctqtn comamcd inlhlj box hava bewi male bya fiEt-OlSS IMfSSSl 
i MF WSCROf THE CIGW MAKERS 'INIUIIlTIOIIAL UNION ol Aflciu. in miliOMi devoted hi the ad- 
vjncfmEiil of the MOH«>Wl[HIAlind INimiCIIWI WlKAtt Of TXC CRATf. Jltvelmwuamttai 
tf£se Ci^tz to all smohers Uirouqhout tha world 

All InlTinqeniflnt} upon this Label fnli be punished accordng totaw. 



F«C 
*»« SIMILE 



V CMlUal 



>f Americ a 



Label Shirts 
label Collars 

Bell Brand Union-Made 
COLLARS in popular 
shapes at two for 25c. 
S H I R TS made right 
here in San Francisco 
by Union Labor. You 
can patronize home 
industry and Union La- 
bor. Good assortment of 
shirts at $1.00 and $1.50. 

Johnston's 

Men's Furnishing Goods 

916 MARKET STREET 

Directly Opposite 5th 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

BED SEAL CIOAB CO., MANUPAaUBCBS 
183 HARTFORD tX., •• F- 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 4 Stores: 

72 MARKET STREET 

1158 MARKET STREET 

605 KEARNY STREET 

2640 MISSION STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Carl Johans Nielsen, native of Nor- 
way, aged 24 years, last heard of in 
1909 at San Francisco, is inquired for 
by S. Thomscn, 7Q9 Cole street, San 
Francisco. 



The schooner Bertha F. Walker, 
Curacoa for Jacksonville, arrived at 
Pensacola recently in distress. 

Fire destroyed Pier C of the South- 
ern Pacific Terminal Company, in the 
western portion of Galveston on Oc- 
tober 7. Loss estimated at $120,000, 
covered by insurance. 

So great was the rush of home- 
ward-bound Americans that four spe- 
cial trains were required to take the 
Mauretania's passengers from Euston 
Station, London, to I^iverpool re- 
cently. 

The steam yacht Venetia, recently 
purchased by John D. Spreckels of 
San Francisco, passed out to sea from 
New York on October 3 on the pass- 
age around the florn. Spreckels and 
some friends made the trip to New 
f^rleans. 

The British steamship Glenshiel, 
llrst of this season's Java sugar fleet, 
arrived at Delaware Breakwater re- 
cently from Sourabaya. Seven other 
vessels with large cargoes of Java 
sii^ar are now on the way to Dela- 
ware Capes for orders. 

The Hamburg-American liner Prinz 
Oskar paid her first visit to Phila- 
delphia on September 29 from Ham- 
burg by way of New York. The ves- 
sel landed several hundred passengers 
at New York and arrived at Phila- 
delphia to discharge a large miscel- 
laneous cargo. 

After forty years service in New 
York Harbor the steam barge Reno- 
vator, formerly the Artisan, arrived at 
Philadelphia recently from New York 
in tow of the tug Atkins Hughes to 
l)e broken up. The barge was built 
at New York in 1865, and registered 
310 tons gross. 

The Bureau of Navigation reports 
that 376 sail and steam vessels, of 95,- 
137 gross tons built in the United 
States during the quarter ended Sep- 
tember 30, 1910. During the corre- 
sponding quarter ended September 30, 
1909, 347 sail and steam vessels of 48,- 
Q14 gross tons were built. 

The Bureau of Navigation reports 
that 125 sail and steam vessels of 42,- 
745 gross tons were built in the Uni- 
ted States during September. The 
largest steam vessel included in these 
figures is the Cyclops (Navy collier), 
of 10,644 gross tons, built at Phila- 
delphia, Pa., by Wm. Cramp & Sons. 

Till' schooner iNlillville was sold at 
i'hiladelphia recently at public auc- 
tion to R. D. Wood & Co., iron 
founders, for $4200. It was believed 
tlie vessel would have brought con- 
siderably more than this, but after the 
bidding reached $4000 an additional 
bid of $200 was ail that the auctioneer 
could secure. 

The North River on October 6 gave 
up the liodies of seven more victims of 
the overturning of the whaleboat of 
the battleship New Hampshire on the 
1st. Twelve bodies were picked up 
on the previous day. The dead sailors 
found on the 6th were George Brown, 
Joseph Y. Pespieski, Morris Sharp, 
August Manlcy, George A. Davis, Ed- 
ward Bloningren and Edward Odette. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



He Always Is. — "I once saw a cou- 
ple married in a den of lions." 
"Did the groom seem scared?" 
"Not any more than is usually the 
case." — Kansas City Journal. 



Good Show. — Purchaser — These 
seats are in the back row. Is there 
any chance Cii exchanging them after 
I get inside? 

Theater Ticket-Seller— Sure! .\fter 
the show begins you'll be able to get 
any seat in the house! — Puck. 



Didn't Like to Say. — "Now, pro- 
fessor, you have heard my daughter 
sing; tell me what I ought to do with 
her?" 

"Sir, if I told you what you ought 
to do with her the law would hold me 
as an accessory." — Houston Post. 



Favorable Sign. — The Friend — Do 
you think your suit for $10,000 dam- 
ages against the railroad will be de- 
cided in your favor? 

The Plaintiflf — It looks like it now. 
My lawyer has just placed an order 
for a $5000 automobile. — Chicago 
News. 



Then He Loved Her Most.— "I love 
you," he cried, passionately. 

"Do you love me alone?" she asked, 
after the manner of cautious maidens. 

"Gee! That's when I love you 
most," he answered, somewhat am- 
biguously. — New York Times. 



What He Got. — Some children were 
telling their father what they got at 
school. The eldest got reading, spell- 
ing and definitions. "And what do 
you get, my little man?" said the 
father to a rosy-cheeked little fellow. 

"O I dets readin', spellin' and 
spankin'." 



As Indicated. — Professor — To what 
class of maladies does insomnia be- 
long ? 

Bright Student — Why — er — insom- 
nia is a contagious disease. 

Professor — Where did you learn 
that? 

Bright Student — From experience. 
When my neighbor's dog can't sleep 
at night I can't either. — Chicago 
News. 



Children's Accounts 

Your children should be taught to 
save. Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them by example 
that you believe In a savings account. 

They can not start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 



783 MARKET STREET, near Fourth 
San Francltco 



Bagley's Navy 



Plug 



A FINE UtIEW 
Give It a Trial 



I ot thg < 



•sg 



THE MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK 

Chronicle Building. 
Successor to 

THE SCANDINAVIAN SAVINGS BANK 

Oflfers to depositors the advantage of an INCOME from money de- 
posited and the PROTECTION afforded by a NATIONAL BANK. 
Interest Paid on Term Deposits. 
Depositary for the United States. 

State of California 
City and County of San Francisco 




Established 1886 



United States 
Watch Gub 

E. r. COLLINS. MaxkKtfer 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Rooms 9 & 10 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

W. L. Douglas Shoes 

AGENTS FOR 

STOCKTON VICUNA FLANNELS, BEST MADE. 

UP-TO-DATE STYLES IN SUITS AT REASONABLE PRICES 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

FAIR PRICES. RELIABLE GOODS. 

50 EAST ST., and 4 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING. 




UENT U. S. eOVERNMENT CHtDTS tNO NAUTICAL PUBIICATIONS 
HyOOGIUPHIC AND CEODETIC 



H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MAR.KET STREET 

Gori at Sicriaiito nil Mirket Sts., SAN FBANCISCO. CAl. 



DEALER IN 



Watches, Chronometers, Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods, Diamonds 



MARINE CS, FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined bjf Transit Observation 
Cnnonomcters and Sextants rented 



J. COHEN 8. CO. 
Baltimore Clothing Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 

HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS. 

California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters. Boss of the Road 

Overalls, 75 cents. Union Label Lace Back, 85 cents. 

Union Label Hickory Shirts, 50 cents. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 

AGENTS FOR CLOVERLEAF RED SOLE BOOTS— GUARANTEED. 



^INTDiNAnONAl. I IJIVIOIV 



9b -<~> Issaad ty 

ITDlACDOWBRniU^ 

^ ^" UNIQK, 




Eyes Examined Free 



Repairing Our Specialty 




James Jt. Sorensen 



JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 
715 MARKET STREET - - - Near Call Bldg. 
2593 MISSION STREET - - - Near 22nd St. 

S.\N FRANCISCO 

The Largest Jewelry Store, with the Largest Stock at 
the Lowest Prices 

ALL WATCH REPAIRING WARRANTED FOR TWO 
YEARS 



UNITED STATES NAUTICAL COLLEGE 

CAPT. J. G. HITCHFIELD, F. R. G. S., Principal 

This Modern Navigation School has no superior In the world to-day. 
A3 a practical navigator the Principal can claim without ostentation to rank 
second to none, and has the right experience and ability to teach you up-to-date 
methods In a systematic and easy manner. You ran find one or more of our pupllB 
on most any vessel sailing out of this port. ASK THEM. 

Advice on Maritime Law, Ship's Business and Naturalization FRBB. 

Evenings By Appointment. 

SPECIAL COURSE IN WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY. 

3M MARKET ST., S. F. Visitors Welcoose. Te^ept tnt Kaarny «U« 




Stove 
Club 



OFFERS DEPENDABLE COOK- 
ING STOVES ON EASY TERMS 

$2.00 Down 

APPLIES ON THE PURCHASE 
PRICE, AND IS ENOUGH TO 
SEND THE STOVE HOME. 

$1.00, $1.50 or $2.00 

A WEEK — ACCORDING TO 
THE PRICE OF THE STOVE- 
SOON PAYS THE BALANCE. 




Charles Lyons 



London 
Tailor 

719 Market St., Near 3rd 

Branch Store 

1432 Fillmore St. 
C. BREINING 

Representing Marine District 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Bet. King and Berry Sts., San Francisco 

GENTS', BOYS', AND 
YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags. etc.. Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Out- 
fits a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at the 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
nut make a mistake — Look for the Name 
and Number. 



WHITE PALACE GOOD- 
YEAR SHOE RE- 
PAIRING CO. 

JOE WEISS, Prop. 

56 East St., bet. Market and 

Mission, San Francisco 

Always in stock full lines 
of Union-Made and Govern- 
ment shoes, new and second- 
hand. 

Your old shoes made new. We use 
the best leather in the market. 

Half Soles, sewed 75 cts. 

Half Soles, sewed, and Heels.. ..$1.00 

Rubber Heels 50 cts. 

All Work Guaranteed! 





t^^.A^s.i^^j^->.-:..^5^r^v-:5rv ^.^i.a v ■'^^sa^^ssgs:^^ 



FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 





A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 


Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 


VOL. XXIV. No. 5. 


SAN FRANCISCO. WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 19. 1910. 


Whole No. 2091. 



STATE FEDERATION REPORTS. 



FOLLOWING are the chief features of the 
reports made by the officers of the Cali- 
fornia State Federation of Labor to the 
convention of that body, held in Los Angeles, 
Cal., October 2,-7: 

PRESIDENT'S REPORT. 

Sacramento, Cal., Sept. 15, 1910. 
To the Officers and Delegates to the Eleventh 
Annual Convention of the California State Fed- 
eration of Labor. 
Greeting: 

In accordance with well established custom I 
herewith submit my report for the year 1910, to- 
gether with such suggestions and recommenda- 
tions as I consider advisable and pertinent at 
this time. 

Appended hereto will be found the reports of 
the Executive Council, the Secretary-Treasurer, 
the Auditing Committee, and the Vice-Presidents 
of the eight districts of the State. 

In presenting this report for your considera- 
tion I shall leave the details of the work of the 
past year to be covered by the reports of the 
Executive Council, the Vice-Presidents and the 
Secretary-Treasurer, and those representatives to 
whom special duties have been intrusted. 

During the year your Executive Council has 
held four meetings, one of which I was unable 
to attend, owing to illness, and a fifth one will 
be held, subsequent to this writing, but previous 
to the meeting of this convention. 

The Farmers' Union. 

At the meeting held October 8, 1909, Brother 
Tom C. Seaward, Vice-President for the Second 
district, was elected as fraternal delegate to the 
first convention of the California Farmers' Edu- 
cational and Co-Operative Union, held at Fresno, 
on November 8, 1909. 

He will report on the efifort to get in closer 
touch with our brother producers — the tillers of 
the soil, and much good may follow from the pro- 
motion of matters in which we have a common 
interest. 

Migratory Labor. 

At the meeting of October 17, 1909, a com- 
mittee of four was selected to act in conjunc- 
tion with like committees from the San Fran- 
cisco Labor and Building Trades Councils, in 
devising ways and means, and outlining a plan 
for organizing the migratory laborers of the State. 

At a meeting held April 17, 1910, the Joint Com- 
mittee on Migratory Labor being present, a sub- 
committee of six was appointed to draft a definite 
plan of action in organizing the migratory and 
unskilled laborers, and the sum of two hundred 
dollars per month was appropriated to assist in 
financing the proposition. 

The Joint Committee selected Brothers J. B. 
Dale and Ed. Thompson as organizers and they 
have submitted weekly reports to the Executive 
Council. This convention will receive a report 
on this important subject and will be in position 
to determine whether this much to be desired ob- 
ject is practicable, and whether the results at- 
tained justify the expenditure of money and en- 
ergy in this directions. 

Political Records. 

The records of the California delegation in 



Congress, on Labor bills, forwarded to us by 
the American Federation of Labor, have been 
sent to affiliated bodies for tlieir information. All 
Republican and Democratic candidates for Rep- 
resentative in Congress, other than incumbents, 
have been questioned as to their attitude toward 
the bills in Congress, favored by organized la- 
bor, covering the subjects of the abuse of the 
process of injunction, the Sherman Anti-Trust 
law, the Eight-Hour Day, and Convict Labor. 

Labor Legislation. 

As one of the most important functions of this 
organization consists in securing the enactment 
into law of measures in the interest of labor, in 
correcting abuses in existing statutes, and in de- 
feating propositions inimical to our cause, I take 
occasion, at this time, to offer some suggestions 
on this highly important topic. 

I have been at the seat of our State government 
for over twenty-five years, and have had consid- 
erable experience in legislative matters. 

I cannot too strongly advise this Convention to 
confine its efforts to the passage of a very lim- 
ited number of bills of primary importance to 
our cause. Too often, in the past, has a multi- 
plicity of bills resulted in the passage of measures 
of little value to the labor movement, while laws 
of vital importance have been allowed to die in 
committee or on file. 

I would further advise that such bills as may 
be referred to our legislative agent shall be 
carefully scrutinized, and compared with existing 
statutes, in order that no measure shall be pre- 
sented that is already well covered by law, unless 
a decided improvement is manifest. I need but 
recall your attention to the proposed bill extend- 
ing the provisions of the Eight-Hour Law to con- 
tractors and sub-contractors, doing public work 
for any political sub-division of the State. This 
bill was placed in the hands of our legislative 
agent in the session of 1909 and, after much time 
and effort had been expended, it was discovered 
that a staute enacted at the session of 1905 was 
much more effective than our bill, although the 
very existence of such a statute seemed unknown 
to our various city, county and State officials. 

Such was, to some degree, the case with a 
Child Labor Law placed in the hands of our 
legislative agent at the same time. 

In fact while the proposed laws were rneritor- 
ious the existing laws covered the subject in 
much better manner. I am of the opinion that 
the work of whoever is entrusted with the pro- 
motion of bills endorsed by this Convention 
should be confined to our own bills, and that 
there should be no entangling alliances with other 
labor bodies seeking the advancement of llieir 
own pet measures. 

Too often, in my experience, has it occurred 
that when our agent has secured the support of 
our law makers for an important bill he is ham- 
pered in his efforts by being called on to assist 
in promoting the measures of other organiza- 
tions, until the legislator begins to think that we 
are lineal descendants of the horse leechs' daugh- 
ter, and asks if we intend to tie him up com- 
pletely. 

I would advise that we select a reliable and 
experienced legislative agent, place him in charge 
of a few important measures, and then give him 



an assistant, as two men are necessary, and one 
of the two should be the responsible head. 

One man is required in each house, and bills 
are often in the hands of two committees meeting 
at the same time in different places. 

Almost all bills are introduced in identical form 
in both houses, and it is impossible to predict 
which of the two will be advanced the furthest 
and which should be pressed ahead for final pas- 
sage. 

I consider the suggestions made above the most 
effective and only practicable method of proced- 
ure for the accomplishment of desired results 
and it is the result of many years of practical 
experience in whaf is known as lobbying. 

During the past year there has been no regu- 
lar session of the State Legislature, so there is 
no legislative work to report on, hut the session 
of 1911 will convene in January, and it will be 
necessary for this Convention* to decide on the 
measures that we desire enacted into law, and 
select the ones who will have charge of them in 
Sacramento. I shall, as I have in the past, give 
all possible assistance to our legislative agent. 

New Affiliations. 

During the past year our organization has been 
materially strengthened by the affiliations of a 
number of Unions hitherto not in the fold, but 
there yet remain many unions unaffiliated. I note 
with pleasure that the unions comprising the State 
Building Trades Council have, with few excep- 
tions, joined our body; and we may reasonably 
hope to number all eligible unions in our ranks 
during the coming year, so that organized labor 
may act as a unit in any matter of concern to 
the labor movement. 

With this end in view I believe this Convention 
should take action, through the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, for the enforcement of the pro- 
visions of .'\rticle XI, Sec. 6, of the Constitution 
of that body. National and International Unions 
should insist on their locals joining with us. 
This will make our State Federation more truly 
representative, and will add greatly to our mem- 
bership, revenue, and consc(|uent influence for 
good. 

The Union Label. 

I am gratified to note a marked increase in the 
agitation for the use of the union label, and the 
formation of Union Label Leagues in every lo- 
cality. While I am aware of the great importance 
of this movement and realize the potency of this 
emblem of fair wages, shorter hours and reason- 
able conditions I shall not dwell on the subject, 
as it will be handled by those who have made a 
special study of it. 

Direct Primary Law. 

The Direct I'rimary Law has been given its 
first trial in thi.s State and I believe the result 
has demonstrated the need of some radical 
changes in the present statute; as it is cumber- 
some, expensive and otherwise defective. 

Mackenzie's Pro-Japanese Report. 

I shall not touch on the misrepresentation of 
the attitude of California, on the subject of Chi- 
nese and Japanese Labor, by the Commissioner 
of the State Bureau of Labor St;itistics, further 
than to say that this Convention should go on 
record as condemning the statements made, and 
should present to the people of our State a refu- 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



tation of the statements made by Commissioner 
J. D. Mackenzie. 

Los Angeles Strike. 

The condition of the strikes in the brewing and 
metal trades industries, in the city of Los An- 
geles, will be fully reported on by the General 
Campaign Strike Committee and, while I have 
no doubt of ultimate victory, the payment by all 
unions, of the weekly assessment will hasten this 
much desired conclusion. I believe the strikers 
deserve and will have the sympathy of the great 
majority of the people of our State. One fact 
alone appeals strongly to impartial citizens, and 
that is that a very large percentage of those on 
strike in the metal trades were non-unionists. 
Conditions became so unbearable, under the "open 
shop" system, that these unorganized workmen 
went out witli the union men, and have stayed out. 

They have been cared for by the union men, 
and their necessities are the main reason for the 
assessment now being collected. Assistance is to 
be given by our brothers in other sections of the 
countr)' and the sinews of war will be furnished 
in quantity sufficient to insure victory for our 
striking brothers of Los Angeles. 

The term "open shop" appeals strongly to the 
average citizen who is imaware that it is a mis- 
nomer, and that in reality it means a "shop 
closed" to organized labor men, and also means 
the sacrifice of manhood and abject slavery to 
those employed therein. 

The conditions in Los Angeles, previous to this 
strike, and still existing in some crafts, demon- 
strates conclusively the ultimate result of un- 
checked corporate greed and tyranny, and adds 
additional evidence to the fact that collective bar- 
gaining is a necessity for the preservation of the 
American standard of living. 

It further proves that, while trade unionism 
may not be a panacea for all of labor's ills, it yet 
remains the most effective agency in existence 
for the prevention of industrial slavery. 

Pure Food Laws. 

I am of the opinion that the welfare of our 
people demands a rigid enforcement of the pure 
food laws, and particularly those relating to milk 
being produced, handled and sold under sanitary 
conditions. 

The helpless infants of our working people are 
more at the mercy of careless dairymen and un- 
scrupulous milk dealers, than those of our well- 
to-do citizens for obvious reasons, and the infant 
mortality from impure milk is greatest among the 
poor. 

I would advise that this Convention shall de- 
termine whether the present State law is suffi- 
ciently protective, or if there is laxity of en- 
forcement. I would further advise that our city 
central bodies shall be urged to take steps to- 
wards securing all the protection possible from 
the danger of an unsanitary milk supply. 

Panama Pacific Exposition. 
I consider that the time is opportune for this 
Convention to tender its moral support to the 
movement favoring federal recognition of the City 
of San Francisco, ?lie metropolis and chief sea- 
port of our Golden State, as the location for the 
Panama Pacific Exposition in 1915; and T would 
recommend that our incoming Executive Council 
shall be empowered and instructed to forward, 
at the proper time, a memorial on this subject to 
both houses of Congress and to the President of 
the United States, strongly urging the claim of 
San Francisco for official recognition. 

Conclusion. 

The labor movement in our State is on a firm 
basis and is destined to grow and gain strength 
with the coming years, and the representatives of 
organized labor, in this and preceding conven- 
tions, may congratulate themselves on the fact 
that they have aided materially in helping to 
make our fair State a place wherein industrial 
slavery shall not find an abiding place. 

I most cheerfully bear testimony to the valua- 
ble work done by my fellow members of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee during the term just closing 
and can refer with pleasure to the harmony 
which has at all times prevailed. 

While I am of the opinion that the presidency 
of this body is largely honorary and that, except 
possibly in times of extraordinary emergency, it 
should be held for but one term, I hold to a 
contrary opinion as to the office of Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

This position is the working end of our organ- 
ization, and when a competent, reliable and effi- 
cient officer is tried in this capacity and is found 
well fitted for its duties, I believe it wise to re- 
tain him in office as long as he can qualify and 
may be induced to remain. 

This organization has been fortunate in having, 
in the past, several capable men in this position, 
but none have excelled the incumbent in the pos- 
session of the qualifications which a proper per- 
formance of its duties requires. 

I have been connected with this body since its 
second convention, have been a member of your 
Executive Council for'the past six years, and 
have been honored with the highest office in your 
gift. 

I am deeply appreciative of the honors con- 
ferred upon me and, in surrendering my present 
position, shall remain in the ranks a sincere work- 
er for the noble cause of Labor. My errors have 
been in judgment and not in intent, and I have 
endeavored to do my duty in every position in 
which I have been placed by my fellow wage 
earners. 



In conclusion I wish to tender my sincere 
thanks to tliis body for the many honors con- 
ferred on me, and to express the hope, in retir- 
ing from the presidency, that I may carry with 
me the esteem of those I have endeavored faith- 
fully to serve. 

With a heartfelt wish for the continued success 
of the California State Federation of Labor, I 
hereby submit the foregoing as my report. 
Yours fraternally, 
DANIEL D. SULLIVAN, 
President. 



REPORT OF EXECUTIVE COUNCIL. 

The Executive Council held five meetings dur- 
ing the year, not counting the Special Meeting 
held on June 11th with reference to the Los An- 
geles strike situation. 

The various propositions referred to the Coun- 
cil by the late convention have been disposed of, 
and new problems dealt with from time to time 
in accordance with the laws of the Federation. 

The Farmers' Unions. 

In accordance with the wishes of the San Ra- 
fael convention to send a delegate to the con- 
vention of the California Farmers' Educational 
and Co-Operative Union, Brother Thomas C. Sea- 
ward was chosen by the Executive Council to 
represent the Federation at said Convention, 
which met at Fresno on November 8, 1909. 

^Ve should bear in mind that the farmers' or- 
ganizations were formed for practically identical 
purposes as our trade-unions. Further, the offi- 
cers of the farmers' unions have exhibited a 
friendly and fraternal spirit to our movement 
which bodes well for co-operative work of the 
future. The farmers have placed on the market, 
through their organizations, raisins in packages, 
prunes, dried fruits and canned goods, bearing 
the Farmers' Union Label. We are asked to 
purchase goods bearing their label and in turn 
they are boosting our union label products. Dur- 
ing the year your Secretary was invited to ad- 
dress the Farmers' Union of Napa and a number 
of the members voluntarily exhibited the L'^nion 
Labels on their wearing apparel, although there 
is no trade-union activity of any kind in the town 
of Napa. 

We trust that the harmony and good will now 
existing between the organized farmers and wage- 
workers of California will continue to grow and 
we believe that our efforts in that direction should 
be continued. 

The Los Angeles Situation. 

It is not our purpose to set forth in detail the 
causes which led to the lock-out and strikes now 
in force in Los Angeles. .Xs is generally known, 
the present fight was started by the Merchants 
and Manufacturers' Association when the manag- 
ers of the various breweries were practically 
forced, through threats and other means, to lock 
out their employes, who were members of the 
International Union of United Brewery Work- 
men. 

The strike of the metal trades workers for the 
eight-hour workday began on June 1, after the 
Merchants and Manufacturers' Association, which 
absolutely controls every industry, had repeatedly 
refused to enter into any negotiations, and even 
informed the unionists that their request for a 
conference had been thrown in the waste-basket! 
One of the pleasing features of the beginning of 
this strike was the fact that union and non-union 
men alike, numbering about 1,200, walked out side 
by side when the hour had arrived to make a 
stand against the most unjust, merciless and 
tyrannous aggregation of employers that ever 
affiictcd -any community. 

On June 11, a conference of representatives 
from the State Building Trades Council, Califor- 
nia State Federation of Labor, the Labor Coun- 
cils and Building Trades Councils of San Fran- 
cisco and Alameda counties was held in San 
Francisco, and it was unanimously a,greed to pick 
up the gauntlet thrown down by the Los Angeles 
employers, and to recommend to the unions 
through the State that they assess their mem- 
bers 25 cents per week for the aid of Los An- 
geles. The State Federation of Labor, through 
its Executive Council, immediately issued a cir- 
cular letter explaining the situation and recom- 
mending to all unions to vote upon the levying 
of an assessment of 25 cents per week. 

The General Strike Campaign Committee, com- 
posed of representatives from the above named 
organizations, has held weekly meetings at the 
San Francisco Building Trades Temple since its 
formation. O. A. Tveitmoe and Andrew J. Gal- 
lagher have served the committee as chairman and 
secretary-treasurer, respectively, giving a great 
deal of their time and energy to this cause. 

At this writing the strike is in splendid shape. 
It is needless to recite to this Convention the 
general progress and the many noteworthy inci- 
dents relating to the strike. The shameful sub- 
serviency of the Los Angeles City Council to the 
employers' association was exhibited by the unan- 
imous adoption of the infamous ordinance osten- 
sibly prohibiting picketing, but in reality attempt- 
ing to deprive the strikers of constitutional rights. 
,A most peculiar feature of the Los .'\ngeles em- 
ployers' contemptible methods should be recorded 
in this report. The Merchants and Manufactur- 
ers' Association and all the elements that are 
controlled by it, prate year in and year out about 
"individual liberty," the "rights of non-unionists," 
etc., and refuse positively to have any dealings 
with unionists. At the same time the association 



forces every business and manufacturing concern 
m the "City of Individual Liberty" to join its 
ranks, threatening to boycott and ruin those who 
fail to join "their union." 

The contributions to the Los Angeles strike, 
through the Strike Campaign Committee, have, 
in the main, been prompt and liberal. We rec- 
ommend that this convention take such steps as 
may be necessary to provide for a regular weekly 
supply of funds until the battle is won. The In- 
ternational Local Unions throughout the country 
will do their share, but we must continue to pro- 
vide our part in order to demonstrate once for 
all that organized capital can never crush "united" 
organized labor in the State of California; not 
even in the City of Los Angeles. 

A detailed statement of the receipts and dis- 
bursements by the General Strike Campaign 
Committee, to and including September 24, has 
been prepared by Secretary Gallagher, and will 
be available for the guidance of this convention. 

Migratory Labor. 

The task of organizing the migratory workers 
of the State has had the care and attention of the 
Executive Council during the entire year. 

At the meeting of the Executive Council, held 
on October 17, a committee of four members was 
appointed to meet with like committees from the 
San Francisco Labor Council and the San Fran- 
cisco Building Trades Council for the purpose of 
formulating definite plans for organizing unskilled 
workers. The two Councils promptly complied 
with the request and apopinted four delegates 
each, thus forming a joint committee composed of 
twelve members, as follows: From the San Fran- 
cisco Labor Council, John O. Walsh, David Roo- 
nan, E. H. Lomasney and Theo. Johnson; from 
the San Francisco Building Trades Council, O. 
A. Tveitmoe, E. E. Phillip^s, W .T. Dwyer and 
W. I. Flagler; from the California State Federa- 
tion of Labor, Harry Menke, D. J. Murray, T. K. 
Thompson and Paul Scharrenberg. The joint 
committee elected John O. Walsh, chairman, and 
Paul Scharrenberg. secretary-treasurer. The va- 
rious phases of the problem were discussed from 
every point of view at several meetings. All per- 
sons who had any ideas or opinions on the sub- 
ject were given an opportunity to present the 
same either personally or in writing. 

It was finally agreed to place two organizers 
in the field to start work in Alameda county. San 
Francisco having in existence a good organiza- 
tion of laborers for some years past. 

The general plan agreed upon is to organize la- 
borers' unions, first in the larger cities, where they 
may soon become self-supporting, then in the 
smaller cities and towns, and ultimately the agri- 
cultural laborers in the country districts. 

.All organizations formed are to be chartered 
directly by the American Federation of Labor, 
under the name of "United Laborers," with a 
mutual arrangement to exchange cards and trans- 
fer membership from any one to another of these 
locals. 

In addition, it is proposed to have established 
Municipal Employment Bureaus in the larger 
cities. An ordinance to this effect was introduced 
in San Francisco by Supervisor J. O. Walsh 
and referred to the City Attorney for an opinion. 
Later it was decided, in order to remove all doubt, 
to introduce an amendment to the Charter ex- 
pressly authorizing the establishment of a Mu- 
nicipal Employment Bureau. This amendment 
will be voted upon at the special election to be 
held in November. 

It is also proposed to have enacted a law 
which will provide for regular pay days at least 
twice a month for work and labor performed for 
private and corporation employers. We should 
also endeavor to secure further legislation to 
place more restrictions upon the disgraceful sys- 
tem of plunder practiced by many private employ- 
ment agencies. 

The reports of Organizers J. B. Dale and Ed 
Thompson, who were selected by the joint com- 
mittee to carry on the organization work, will 
be found elsewhere. Their work began June 1 
and they have been kept at it ever since. The 
net results are as follows: A splendid organiza- 
tion has been established in Oakland. Another, 
more recently at Richmond, which is a rapidly 
growing manufacturing community. The well or- 
ganizc(l San Francisco union of laborers, which 
has been a purely local union, without national 
tics, for some time past, was mduccd to become 
affiliated with the American Federation of Labor, 
under the name of "United Laborers of San 
Francisco." Owing to the situation in Los An- 
geles, Organizer Dale spent the past few weeks 
in southern sections of the State looking over 
the field for future work, incidentally giving val- 
uable assistance to the Los .Angeles strikers, and 
organizing several new locals of National and 
International unions. The formation of the Co- 
alinga Labor Council was also brought about 
manly through the effort of Brother Dale. 

It should be borne in mind that the greater 
part of the past year was taken up in prepara- 
tory work. During the early part of the year 
there was some uncertainty about our ability to 
finance the project, but we have now an assured 
income to carry on this great work for the com- 
ing year without interruption, and your Execu- 
tive Council presents this portion of its report 
to your earnest consideration. While many dele- 
gates may fear that this work is of a herculean 
nature, all must agree that the presence of a large 
body of workers in an unorganized state consti- 

(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



RADIUM IN AUSTRALIA. 



A company is now engaged in developing 
a prospect in South Australia, close to the 
New South Wales border. Latest reports 
from this property state that the shaft is 
down 130 feet and a large, strongly defined 
reef is showing. The ore coming up is 
black, loose-looking material, carrying big 
patches of bright yellow carnotite. This is 
believed to be highly radio-active, and tests 
are being made to prove this. An eminent 
radium authority is now engaged on this 
task, and professes himself highly satisfied 
with his investigations. 

Local medical authorities are casting 
about for a means whereby radium can be 
brought within the realm of possibility for 
persons of small meahs. An appeal has been 
made through the press of this city for 
£2000 ($9733) to be used for the purchase 
by the hospital of radium for general thera- 
peutic uses. Public response has so far not 
been very vigorous, although something 
over $1000 has been subscribed. 

Another proof of the interest being mani- 
fested here is furnished by the announce- 
ment that the Government of New South 
Wales is considering the question of form- 
ing a state radium bank. The matter has 
been before the ministers concerned. It has 
been referred by them to the medical au- 
thorities, and it is understood the medical 
authorities are favorable. The scheme is one 
for making the treatment of cancers, naevi, 
and other troubles by means of radium avail- 
able, not only to every hospital, but to every 
private practitioner in the State, both in 
Sydney and throughout the country. Such 
a bank, is it said, is already established in 
Paris and London. There it is a private 
paying concern. Here the proposal which 
the Government is considering is for a state 
bank with a capital of £5000 ($24,332), it 
being explained that the arrangement to be 
made is that the Government should hire 
radium out to private practitioners, as is 
done in London and Paris, and out of the 
returns should provide sinking fund and in- 
terest, while ample radium would be left 
constantly in the bank to be supplied to any 
recognized public hospital for the free treat- 
ment of patients who are genuinely unable 
to pay for it. 



A WHITE MAN'S COUNTRY, 



The opposition to Asiatic labor is stronger 
in Australia than in Canada. Canada has a 
climate suited to Europeans. The northern 
part of Australia has a climate almost tropi- 
cal. It is difficult for Europeans to endure 
the life of a plantation laborer in that part 
of the Commonwealth. As a matter of fact, 
the land is almost unoccupied, and settle- 
ment makes little progress. A Sydney pa- 
per is now publishing a series of papers on 
"The Empty North," describing the vast 
natural resources — agricultural and mineral 
— of the northern part of the continent, 
showing that mines have been closed down 
and rich lands neglected all for want of 
labor. 

Nevertheless the Commonwealth as a 
whole and each of the states are resolved to 
keep Australia a white man's country. They 
hold that slow progress is better than the 
importation of Asiatic labor. If free Asiatic 
labor is once recognized it must soon be the 
only labor employed. Europeans cannot 
and will not compete with Orientals in the 



labor market, and the country which intro- 
duces Asiatic labor banishes the white la- 
boring class. 

Australia does not consider it desirable 
to retire the British population from work 
and have all the labor performed by immi- 
grants from Asia. Better that the world 
should go elsewhere for sugar and the land 
lie barren than that servile races should be 
introduced, preventing further immigration 
from Britain, and dividing the European 
population into two classes, one composed 
of gentlemen of leisure, the other of "poor 
whites." — Vancouver (B. C.) News Adver- 
tiser. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



A WORLD LANGUAGE. 



The necessity of providing some standard 
medium for education in the sciences and 
the arts had long been pressing in China. 
A memorial of the Ministry of Education, 
on which the Prince Regent bases his de- 
cree , expressly recognizes the inadequacy 
of Chinese to render technical and scientific 
terms, notes the incongruities that have 
arisen through the rivalries of foreign 
trained instructors and says the time has 
come for uniformity. 

English, it continues, was the first of for- 
eign languages introduced in China ; it is 
most widely used there and in the world. 
Most imported text-books are in English. 
"It is, therefore, proposed that in ihe dif- 
ferent schools teaching technical and scien- 
tific subjects the English language be adopt- 
ed. In the case of schools which do not now 
include foreign languages in the curriculum 
they must in the future be taught. The 
study of foreign languages is to be made 
compulsory in those schools where they 
are now optional. 

"In all provincial high schools (scientific 
and technical) already existing or estab- 
lished in the future the studies (with the 
exception of ethics, Chinese literature, his- 
tory and geography) pertaining to science 
shall be taught in English. When the stu- 
dents are sent to Peking for final examina- 
tion after graduation they shall be examined 
through the medium of the English lan- 
guage." 

Even now it is not uncommon to hear 
two Chinese from dififerent provinces using 
English as a medium in conversation, for 
although the written language is alike 
throughout China the speech differs widely. 
The common knowledge of English may 
thus come in the future to play an important 
part in building up a national consciousness. 
It is generally recognized that the share of 
American missionary schools in preparing 
the way for this momentous decree has 
been very great. — The Churchman. 



From time to time articles appear in 
newspapers in the Far East that oil has 
been discovered on Russian Sakhalin Is- 
land. Oil has been known to exist there for 
many years, and two expeditions have been 
working on the island during the past win- 
ter. Direct reports from there show that 
wells have been drilled, and although the 
prospects are encouraging, nothing definite 
has been accomplished, and reports to the 
contrary may be treated as exaggerations. 



Novelties in the electric line arc cigar 
and cork branders, which supply just 
enough heat to mark the articles on which 
they are used without burning them. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 1J4 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Subdivisions. 

Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, Ij^ Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Maritime Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 143 West Madison St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buflfalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle, 
Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Australasia. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

25 Arcade, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf, Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 
Great Britain. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E., 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull. 

Belgium. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Diepestr 
152, Antwerpen, Belgium. 

Germany. 

Zentralverband Seemannischer Arbeiter, Ham- 
burg 1, Bensenbinderhof 57, IV., Zimmer 54 
(Gewerkschaftshaus), Germany. 

France. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place de la 
Joliette. 

Norway. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund, Stavanger, Norway. 

Sweden. 
Svenska-Sjomens-og Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 
Denmark. 
Somandcnes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Holdbod- 
gade 11, Kid., Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Told- 
boldgade 8, Denmark. 

Holland. 
Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, 2 e 
Atjehstr. 6, Amsterdam. 

Italy. 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Mare, 
Genova Vico Casosini, No. 8, Italy. 
Austria. 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beitcr und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

Spain. 

Fedcracion Nacional de Obreros de Mar (]^ 
Buques v Puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 (Bar- 
celoncta), Spain. 

Uruguay. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Marineros, Monte- 
video, Rampla 103, Uruguay. 

Argentina. 

Lega Obrera (Sailors and Firemen) Sinforiano 
Corvetto. Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos) 
und Suarez 44. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



The total number of persons idle in 
England as a result of labor disputes 
is 200,000. 

The number of fata! accidents to 
British seamen reported during Au- 
gust was 67, a decrease of 4 on a 
month ago and of 15 on a year ago. 

The number of British paupers re- 
lieved on one day in August in the 
thirty-five urban districts corre- 
sponded to a rate of 215 per 10,000 of 
the estimated population. 

The trouble between the Federation 
of Master Cotton Spinners, which re- 
sulted in the lockout of 1.30.000 opera- 
tives, was settled at Manchester, Eng., 
on October 6 and the mills were re- 
opened on the 10th. 

A street car company at Warsaw, 
Poland, on October 3 promised to 
consider the wage demands of its em- 
ployes, and a normal service through- 
out the city was restored. One thou- 
sand strikers who were arrested iiavc 
been released. 

Returns received from certain se- 
lected British ports show that during 
August 46.018 seamen, of whom 
3,755 (or 8.2 per cent.) were foreign- 
ers, were shipped on foreign-going 
vessels. Compared with August, 1909. 
there was an increase of 3,253. 

During the eight months ended 
August, 1910, the total number of 
British workers reported killed in the 
course of their employment (exclusive 
of seamen) was 1964, as compared 
with 1874 in 1909. The total number 
of seamen killed in the same period 
was 693 in 1910 and 633 in 1909. 

The Federation of Master Cotton 
Spinners at Manchester, Eng., on 
October 1, declared a lockout of 130,- 
000 operatives and at noon closed the 
doors of the 700 mills owned by its 
members. The trouble arises out of 
the discharge of a single employe in 
the Fern mill at Oldham. 

The net result of all the changes in 
British wages in August was an in- 
crease of £648 per week, as compared 
with one of £1630 per week in July, 
and a decrease of £421 per week in 
August, 1909. The number of work- 
people affected was 23,062, of whom 
19,562 received advances and 3500 sus- 
tained decreases. 

Exclusive of seamen, the nmuber of 
British workers killed in the course of 
their employment during .■\ugust was 
239, an increase of 24 on a month ago, 
and of 30 on a year ago. The mean 
number for August in the years 1905- 
1909 was 236. the maximum year being 
1908, with 274 deaths, and the mini- 
mum year 1909, with 209 deaths. 

The total number of cases of poi- 
soning and of anthrax reported to the 
British Home Office during August 
was 48, consisting of 42 cases of lead 
poisoning, 1 case of mercurial poison- 
ing, 1 of arsenic poisoning, and 4 
cases of anthrax. One death due to 
lead poisoning was also rci)orted. In 
addition, 26 cases of lead poisoning 
(four of which were fatal) were re- 
ported among house-painters antl 
plumbers. 

The total number of fatal acci- 
dents at British mines and quarries 
in August was 107, as compared with 
106 in July, and 94 in August, 1909. 
The total number of accidents re- 
ported under the Factory and Work- 
shops Act during August was 96, as 
compared with 11 a month ago and a 
year ago. The corresponding figures 
for workpeople employed in the rail- 
way service were 35, 32, and 36 re- 
spectively. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Union Made Clothing for Sea Faring Men 



MEN'S SUITS MADE TO ORDER 
First Class Goods Low Prices 



F. M. &. C. B. CANNON 439 Front, 440 B«acon St., San Pedro 



BEN. B. LIPPMAN 

S3 2 BEACON & S31 FRONT, next to Fritz & Emett 
SAN PEDRO CAU 

COMPLETE SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

Union Goods for Union Men 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Francisco prices. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafaring men invited to inspect aur 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth, SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. BRO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Francisco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 18S6, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to know the class of goods you want The San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at iO cents. 




him. Loose labels in 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and ofiers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
retail stores are counterfeits. 



JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
VIARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room If, New York, N. Y. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Etnbalmer 

Fourth Street, 

Between Front and Beacon Sta., 

SAN PEDRO. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUQOiSTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FRONT ST., GPP. 8. P. DEPOT. 

■AN PBDRO, CAl.. 



WALK-OVER SHOES 

SOLD EXCLUSIVELY BY 

LEVY'S DEPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

SIS Front St. S14 Beacon St. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealers In 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 

Agents Harbor Steam Laundry. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories. 
NO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

William McGrail, of Baltimore, 
.VId., who sailed on the Atlantic and 
Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 
years, is inquired for by his brother, 
George McGrail, 603 Decatur street. 
New Orleans, La. 

James Murphy, marine fireman, 
last heard of from Sydney, and sup- 
posed to be sailing out of San Fran- 
cisco, is inquired for by Ellen Mur- 
phy, Lawrence St., Liverpool. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Soren P. Nielsen, a native of 
.'\arhus, Denmark, born 1887, is in- 
quired for by his sister. Address, 
Danish Consulate, New Orleans, La. 

Arthur Taplctt, age 18, last heard 
from at Wilmington, N. C, in April, 
1908, is inquired for by relatives. 
Please forward any information con- 
cerning him to Mrs. Eleanor M. Her- 
man, R. F. D. No. 4, Box 310, Ta- 
coma, Wash. 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Aire, Oscar Le Bloa. Sylvian 

Anderson, T. -557 Larsen, J. -1542 

Anderson, J. G. Mlchelson, J. 

Abell, B. Moss. A. 

Andersson, G. -41 Menz, Paul 

Andersen, A. M. Meyer, H. 

-1055 Moore, J. M. 

Andersen, A. 1447 Mesak, Eduard 

Anderson, J. -1514 McDonough, W. 

Adams. Jacob Maroth, Hichard 

Ambearnsen, Algoy Mueller, Hugo 

Apps P Nielsen, Slvert 

Anderson. Martin Nielsen, A. -1064 

Anderson, Charlie Newman, David 

Anderson, Gust Nevander, Alex. 

Anderssen, Frank S«^'^°"- •'°'j" C- 

Anderson, Carl S°'"?^''®'J;r,9'^^^- 

Arrhenlus, Chas. Sfi^^"""' J^ "1°" 

Behrend, F. C. S"^l"'r-''- i"^**' 

Birry, James ^ord, Emil 

Backman, Ernest S^ril^?"'^'^-,!. 

T>_„_j„_ ■ar Nelson, Eddie 

Hotrrom w Nicholas, Thomas 

Bentsen ■ Hans Nystrom. R. 
Bwlln C J (pkE) Ohlsen. Valdemar 

Bhfmaulst' C O'^^"- ^- "6" 

Bordje"m,'AVex. ^Isson, A. P -1109 

Bowman, K. Hj. 9^^"- ?• -^^^ 

Beyerly. Rupert 9'!^"- ■^'^u 

Bell. Frank M. Ottesen, Chas. 

Carlson, Carl SP.P^'"'^*"' ^• 

Chrlstensen, M. X,^''^'' V?^ v, . 

Christiansen. Elgil Ols^n, Hagbart 

Christenson. H. X, ^^"•i, . ' 

Dibble, P. W. O sen, Pete 

Eugene, John O sen, George A. 
Emanuelsen, A. -66lX, ^°"'Jr' » 

Erickson, John O^^"- "^]^,^-„,,. 

Erickssen, J. E. SLlT"' •^r'.'?""*^ 

Fletcher, Billy Sff^H'i;,.?'^"^'^^, 

FaslE^ Don Peachman. Geo. 

Fritfheir^," R. lZVr".nI'r'^» 1149 

Frantsen, N. -562 E!^"°"x^- Jlh? 

Gustavsen, Gustav S!r!°r^„ i^Ji 

Graham, L. M. E^!"?°"' i°''" 

Gunwalds, G. ?!'!^?f"-M^- 

Gustafson, John Efrf^Jil'^ n„H^if 

Gronvold. Peter S! "||^' ^^^"^ 

Gustafson, Johan g!'t?„l"- ^''^J 



Gutman, B. 



Pederson, H. S. 



Henriks'en, Albert „ -1907 

Hogstrom, A. Peterson, A. K 

Heckman, Fred Persson, Hj -1230 

Hedlund, Arvid E^"<'"°"v^''?ni.> 

Haltnes, Magnus Petersen C -1092 

Hansen, H. -2060 £*f'l"*"''°Ji'^VT>^- ;, 

Helde, Tom Petersen. M. (Pack- 

Hjelt, Nick r,,*^®^!, , 

Hillig, Albert 5'°"'k^^"* r -«. 

Helmar. O. (Pack- g°^?i'^i"- i ^• 

„„gi Raymond, J. 

Hanspn Carl Rodgers, Charles 

Harris John F Rokow, Stefan 

gfrke,''ci°rl" ^- |»;ri.?'M'' 

Hansen, Peter K. iPJ.?"l^"w?l„ 



Hassall. G. 



Slevers. Herman 



Hanson, L. -794 i?'"fr^^S'Vlr?;r 

Hanspn Hans Styles. Everett 

wansen, Mans ahoion, Hq^o 



Husby, Lars 



Shelenz, Hans 



Isaackken Krlsten Sorensen. C. -1607 

Isaacson Gustav Scott, E. G. -2041 

Inlebretsen O -1>5 Spearing, Gustav 

K'Robert°- |'ir;pr"io}rn '^■ 

Johansen, C .M. -ISasfr? th John 

tr:'ltnr:'\'- 1S74 lorin^s/n^' jtmes ' 

■!nn«nn (^' w Sundc, Albert 

Janson, G. W. Saarinen. H. 

Johansen Herluf stephan, M. 

Johnstadt J. S. Samson, Krlstian 

Johnsen, A. G. Svensen, G. -1579 

Johansson A. -20o0 schlosser, I.. 

Jensen, IJll Sjostrom, Gus 

Johnson, G.B. Schutte, Richard 

tI"."^^.!'.'^- I idr9 Strom. C. -1648 

Jobscn, Ch. Scarabosla 'm 

Janson, Julius bcaraoosia. M. 



Kinsey, W. A. -207 



Smith, M. 



Kolkih, Fred Schluter, Paul 

Kopp, Franz Schwanewede G. 

KuStel, Victor ™"'^"- 4' ^• 

Kpilman, Joe It''""'^-, ?^"' 

Koso, Pete Thor, Walno 

Kusik. M. Tetter, Anton 

Klelshman, F. Tufte, A. Paulsen 

Kallas. Alex. Tuomlnen, Alfred 

Kristensen, Jens Touanne, Walter 

Kallas, M. Utby, Carl 

Larsen, Martin J^?,"€^tl'"' J^''; 

Larson, Jack S f.**®"' ^w ' w 

Lindegard, John S^ 'J?"«">y- ,1^- 

Lewis Georee H Winters. Charles 

Lirsen. icfk'us l'- Wrig Ferdinand 
Leith, Chas. . Wychgel, J. 

Louis, Michael S^^F,"^'"' "«,"'">' 

Larsen, Chris. T. Wallace, Luke 

Larsen, Christian Wilemsen, H. 

Lange, Freidrlch Youngren, E. 

Lyche. Harris Zorning, Arthur 

Lang, Gust. Zornow, Herbert 



When Drinking Beer 
See that this Lahel is 
on the Keg or Bottle 




ALL LOS ANGELES BEER 
IS UNFAIR 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The British steamer Damara grounded in the 
Golden Gate, San Francisco, while proceeding to 
sea during a heavy fog on October 8. 

Frank Campbell, first officer on the British ship 
Glenliolm, was sentenced to four months in the 
County Jail at San Pedro on October 11 for as- 
saulting the ship's carpenter and breaking his 
nose. 

One hundred and ten of the 111 Hindus who 
arrived at San Francisco recently from the Far 
East on the Pacific Mail liner Asia were deported 
on the same vessel, which sailed on October 11 
for the Orient. 

The news that the Union Steamship Company 
of New Zealand will run a four-weekly mail serv- 
ice from Wellington, N. Z., to San Francisco via 
the Cook Islands and Tahiti, has been received 
at Papeete with rejoicing. 

Advices from Washington, D. C.. arc that Con- 
gressman Duncan McKinlay will be appointed to 
succeed the late E. F. Woodward as Surveyor of 
the Port of San Francisco. McKinlay was re- 
cently defeated for renomination to Congress. 

Advices received at Victoria, B. C, on October 
10 from Japan state that the Toyo Kisen Kaisha, 
imder an agreement with the Western Pacific 
Railroad, has agreed to start a direct line from 
Yokohama to San Francisco, omitting the call at 
Honolulu. 

E. Rossquist, a seaman on the steam-schooner 
Fair Oaks, was instantly killed at Everett on 
October 5. The vessel was taking a deck load 
of creosoted piles. One piling swung against 
Rossquist, threw him against the forward house 
and decapitated him. 

The Japanese training squadron, comprising 
the armored cruiser Asama and the protected 
cruiser Kasagi, under command of Captain Ya- 
shiro, sailed from Tokio October 15 for the 
United States. These warships are due at San 
Francisco on November 19. 

With the largest cargo of lumber ever set 
afloat, the British steamship Knight of the Garter 
cleared from Portland on October 14 for Shang- 
hai, via Moji. She has 5,000,000 feet even, which 
is 120,000 feet more than her previous world's 
record cargo, taken from the former port. 

Application will be made at the next session 
of Congress by the Lighthouse Board for the es- 
tablishment by the Government of eight sub- 
marine signals in Southeastern Alaska waters, 
and eight additional stations along the Pacific 
Coast between Tatoosh and Point Loma. 

J. O. Faria has been appointed master of the 
steamship City of Topeka. vice G. M. Johnstone. 
The following vessels were enrolled at the San 
Francisco Custom-house on October 10 for the 
coasting trade: Schooner Fearless, C. M. Lilje- 
quist master; schooner Apena, A. Nielsen master. 

The Vancouver tug Albion, which went ashore 
at Black Point, Scow Bay, on September 30, is a 
total loss. She struck the rocks at night, and 
the heavy sea soon damaged her so seriously that 
the crew were compelled to abandon the tug. The 
Albion was twelve years old and valued at $18,000. 

The following changes of masters and enroll- 
ments were recorded at the San Francisco Cus- 
tom-house on October 15: Changes of masters — 
Schooner Louise, Jens Moller, vice C. S. Chris- 
tensen; schooner Sophie, Adam Donaldson, vice 
John Roberts; enrolled, schooner Alsen, Matthew 
Martin. 

Governor Gillett of California has decided to 
issue a proclamation for the holding in San 
Francisco of a Pacific Coast Congress, to be at- 
tended by delegates from every part of the Pa- 
cific Coast and Hawaii, who will consider mer- 
chant marine legislation and the advisability of 
maintaining a battleship fleet i.i the Pacific 
Ocean. 

The Oceanic liner Mariposa, due at San Fran- 
cisco on October 9 from Tahiti, was 1023 miles 
ofif the lightship at 8 o'clock on the 5th. .Another 
long distance wireless was received at the same 
time from the Pacific Mail liner Manchuria, 
which is steaming from San Francisco to the 
Orient. She reported herself 770 miles west of 
Honolulu. 

A new steamship line from Seattle to San Fran- 
cisco and Los Angeles with the steamships Yale 
and Harvard of the Metropolitan Steamship 
Company of New York as the nucleus, is the pre- 
diction of Albert Schubach. president of the 
Schubach-Hamilton Steamship Company. The 
men behind the new line will be San Francisco 
and New York capitalists. 

Jacob Lichcnstein, a sailor on the Kosmos 
steamship Osiris, was knocked from the deck of 
the vessel to the wharf at Filbert street, San 
Francisco, on October 11 by being struck by a 
sling load of freight. The man was taken to the 
Harbor Emergency Hospital, where it was found 
that his skull had been fractured. He was later 
removed to the German Hospital. 

Thomas Hyde, a seaman on the steam- 
schooner Brooklyn, while working cargo on the 
steam-schooner Brunswick at Howard-street 
wharf No. 2, San Francisco, on October 12, fell 
ten feet into the hold and was severely injured. 
He was treated at the Harbor Emergency Hos- 
pital for contusions of the head and shoulder 
and possible internal injuries. 



The following vessels were enrolled at the San 
Francisco Custom-house on October 3: Schooner 
Adelia Griffin, D. B. Jennings, master; schooner 
Young America, Elias Olsen, master; barkcntine 
Aurora, Henry Samuelson, master; steamer Rio 
Rey, W. O. Watson, master. John S. Smith has 
been appointed master of the steamer George 
Loomis, vice W. F. Samuels. 

George Jessop, San Francisco manager of the 
United Wireless Company, has received word 
from the New York office that the big turbine 
steamers Yale and Harvard, which are to be oper- 
ated between San Francisco and Los Angeles, 
have been equipped with United Wireless instru- 
ments. This apparatus takes the place of the 
Marconi sets, which the steainers formerly used. 

The Bates & Chesebrough independent line of 
steamships has been extended to include Portland 
as a port of call. The Aztec of the line will arrive 
in Portland harbor the last of the month. She 
has already left New York laden with 3000 tons 
of hardware consigned to the new $1,000,000 pl;int 
of the Pacific Hardware and Steel Company. Oth- 
er steamers of the line will follow regularly. 

In spite of the fact that she left the Sound 
four days after the departure of the six-masted 
barkentine Everett G. Griggs, the American ship 
Abner Coburn is the victor in the long race 
across the Pacific to Del.igoa Bay, South /Xfrica. 
Both vessels made smart time to their destina- 
tion. The Abner Coburn completed the passage 
in 122 days, arriving at the South African port 
the same day as the Griggs. 

The whaling bark John and Winthrop, Captain 
Joseph, and the whaling schooner Lettitia, Ma- 
comber, arrived at San Francisco on October 11 
from the Far North, reporting successful cruises. 
The John and Winthrop brought 2000 pounds of 
whale-bone, 200 barrels of whale oil and 800 bar- 
rels of sperm oil to H. J. Knowles. The Letti- 
tia's cargo included 350 barrels of whale oil and 
fifty barrels of sperm oil to the Oakland Whaling 
Company. 

The hearing in the libel filed on the ship Atlas 
of the Standard Oil Company fleet by seventeen 
members of her crew was completed before 
United States Commissioner A. C. Bowman at 
Seattle on October 14. The men demanded their 
wages on reaching Seattle, but Captain McKay, 
the master, declares that under signed articles 
they are not entitled to the money until the ves- 
sel makes San Francisco. They were shipped in 
Philadelphia. 

Application will be made at the next session of 
Congress by the Lighthouse Board for the estab- 
lishment by the Government of eight submarine 
signals in Southeastern Alaska waters and eight 
additional stations along the Pacific Coast be- 
tween Tatoosh and Point Loma. Congress has 
been waiting until enough ships should be 
equipped with receiving apparatus to justify an 
increase of the present number of stations on 
the Pacific. 

Six new steamers, two of which have been or- 
dered in Japan, are to be built to replace the 
steamers now used by the Nippon Yusen Kaisha 
in the trans-Pacific service to Seattle. Orders 
were placed with the Kawasaki Dock Yard Com- 
pany of Kobe and the Mitsubishi Company of 
Nagasaki for two steamers of 6000 tons regis- 
tered tonnage to maintain an average speed of 
from 12 knots, and these vessels will be followed 
by four others. 

Five more whaling steamers are to be built for 
service of the Pacific Whaling Company in British 
Columbia waters by Christiania builders. The 
new whalers will be similar in type to the Wil- 
liam Grant, largest of the fleet of five steam 
whalers now in service from the British Colum- 
bia stations. One, possibly two more whaling 
stations are to be established in North British 
Columbia. At present five steamers are in service 
for the whaling company and three stations are 
in use. 

Waterhouse & Co., managing agents for the 
Weir line, have substituted the new British 
steamer Mineric for the British steamer Croydon 
in the Australian mail line service, and instead 
of loading lumber for Calcutta, the former steam- 
er will make the November sailing from the 
Coast to the Colonies. The Mineric is the newest 
liner in the service, with the exception of the 
Luceric. She was built in 1909 on the Clyde and 
is a modern freighter of 2988 tons net. 405 feet 
long, 52 feet beam and 25 feet depth of hold. She 
is commanded by Capt.iin H. G. Thompson. It 
is understood that the Mineric will be maintained 
in the Australian line. 



FOR SALE. 



Corner saloon on San b'rancisco Water Front, 
building 50x100, six living rooms, long lease, low 
rent Price $3500. Apply at 800 Kentucky. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims of 
all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, California St., near 
Montgomery. Telephones, Kearny 394; Home, 
C 3832. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary-Treasurer, 
1% Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., IVaA Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 221 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumalne St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE, Md.. 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumalne St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, III., 674 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies: 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., Eist. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 
ERIE, Pa., 328 German St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR. O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III., 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St., N. W. 
CHICAGO, 111., 316 W. Kinzle St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, O.. 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, O., 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, O., Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR. Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 208 Eraser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR. O.. 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111.. 242 South Water St. 
MILWAUKEE. Wis.. 317 Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency: 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR Editor 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 
One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six montlis 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



n.oo 



Clianges in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To Insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco PostofBce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 East Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published In the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 19, 1910. 



NEW ZEALAND AGAINST LASCARS. 



The Seamen's Union of New Zealand is 
making a vigorous, intelligent and effective 
fight against the introduction of Lascar- 
manned vessels in the coastwise trade of that 
country. Our fellow craftsmen in the Antipo- 
des are determined that the policy of a "white 
man's country" shall be maintained in the sea- 
faring industry as well as in land callings. 

In the case of New Zealand, as in that of 
the United States, a question of Federal, or 
rather Imperial, authority arises to hinder the 
settlement of the problem in accordance with 
local needs and sentiment. In other words, 
the people of New Zealand must secure the 
approval of the Imperial authorities "at home" 
before they can adopt any measures of self- 
protection. Speaking on this subject in an 
interview in the Dunedin Evening Star, Mr. 
William Belcher, Secretary of the Seamen's 
Union, says : 

In dealing with a subject of this kind it is hard 
to conjecture jitst exactly where the alleged diffi- 
culties lie. But it may be taken for granted that 
the treaties made between Great Britain and 
foreign countries is possibly one of the chief 
things to be considered. After granting that 
point, we then are face to face with the fact that 
Australasia has no voice in the making of those 
treaties, which may seriously militate against the 
general interests of a continent. This is undoubt- 
edly the case with our shipping laws, over which 
the Imperial authorities can exercise a veto 
which may mean ruin and disaster to those who 
have invested large sums of money, and also to 
the detriment of the men who operate the ves- 
sels, along with their wives, families, and de- 
pendents. 

Let us examine for a moment this huge impal- 
pable mass of Imperialism, which seems to over- 
shadow our local statesmen. 

It is an axiom with Australians and New Zea- 
landers that they intend to keep their countries 
"white." This is exemplified in the laws that 
have been passed restricting the admission of 
colored aliens, on whom poll taxes have been 
imposed, and also persons of European nation- 
ality who cannot speak the English language. 
For instance, if a Chinaman desires to come into 
New Zealand a poll tax is imposed. If a colored 
or white alien deserts from a ship in New Zea- 
land the master is liable to a penalty, which has 
been frequently imposed, of £100. This same law 
practically operates in Australia, and there are 
numerous instances on record where the Customs 



authorities have unearthed alien stowaways and 
compelled the ship conveying them to Australia 
to deport them back to their own country. These 
laws have been in existence for some years. At 
the time of their inception it was loudly pro- 
claimed in certain quarters that the Imperial veto 
would be placed upon this restrictive legislation, 
but after the matter had been properly represent- 
ed to the Imperial authorities, and the aspirations 
of Australasia had been made known through 
their respective legislatures, the Imperial authori- 
ties, notwithstanding all the treaties that were in 
existence, eventually conceded the right of its 
dependencies to legislate in this direction. 

Now, if it is necessary and competent for the 
Legislature to keep our shore community free 
from the contamination of the Asiatic and the 
Oriental, why should not exactly the same pro- 
tection be afforded to our ships and seamen? The 
obvious reason of the Legislature in excluding 
these people from our shores is to prevent the 
possibility of competition with races whose stand- 
ard of living is so much below that which per- 
tains in this country. 

So far as the seafaring business is concerned, 
there is even a more important factor. In the 
first place, it is not only a question of lower 
wages, but it practically means the extinction of 
our mercantile marine and the disabling of all 
who are connected with it. Each one of the per- 
sons employed on our vessels is an asset to the 
country. He is a rent, tax, and revenue payer 
to begin with; he and his dependents have a voice 
in electing the members of Parliament who gov- 
ern the country. This is no unimportant matter. 
It should be carefully considered by those who 
now occupy positions in Parliament. 

It may be mentioned in passing that the enact- 
ment of the Aliens Restriction Act in no way 
impaired the efficiency or the stability of the Em- 
pire. The prejudices and the fears in that con- 
nection are already worn out. 

Despite the difficulties in the way of local 
action, it is morally certain that the New Zea- 
land seamen will win their point. The "Gov- 
ernment at home" will concede the demands 
of the Dominion as soon as the latter makes 
it clear that it proposes to protect itself against 
invasion by cheap labor of Lascar or other 
variety. That the people of New Zealand are 
alive to the situation and disposed to aid the 
seamen in this matter is evidenced by the in- 
terest taken in the proposal to bar Lascar- 
manned vessels from the ports of the Domin- 
ion. Replying to the expressions of interest 
and promises of support on the part of the 
labor movement of New Zealand, the follow- 
ing letter has been issued by the Seamen's 
Union : 

Australasian Federated Seamen's Union. 
Dunedin, September 9, 1910 
The Seamen's Union highly appreciates the 
sympathy expressed by the various Trade Coun- 
cils and Industrial Organizations in our efforts 
to allay or minimize the danger of Lascar- 
manned vessels menacing our intercolonial trade. 
Very generous moral support is promised from 
all directions, and the question is invariably 
asked, How can we assist? In answer thereto, 
I would respectfully suggest that if you are in 
hearty accord with the national aspirations actu- 
ating the Seamen's Union that you pass resolu- 
tions to that effect and remit them as soon as pos- 
sible to the Right Hon. the Prime Minister, hand 
same to the press, and request the Parliamentary 
Member from your district to support same. 
Yours faithfully, 

W. BELCHER, Sec. 

We congratulate the seamen of New Zea- 
land upon their splendid fight for the mainte- 
nance of a "white man's country" afloat as well 
as ashore. They will win that fight just as 
they have won so many other fights. Their 
example is an inspiration to seamen every- 
where. The movement of the seamen in other 
countries, including Great Britain and the 
United States, to maintain the supremacy of 
the white man on the seas will go on until 
the ships of all nations shall again be manned 
by the men who mastered the sea and made 
it the chief highway of civilization. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



FEDERATION FOR GLOVE-WORKERS. 



The Union Label Department of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor has amply justified 
its establishment by the good work it has done 
in advancing the cause of the union label. 
This is especially true in the case of those 
label organizations which by virtue of the con- 
ditions of the respective trades are not in a 
position to enforce an appeal to the purchaser. 
Among this class is the Glove-Workers' 
Union. An appeal has been issued by the 
Union Label Department in behalf of this or- 
ganization, which we reprint, as follows : 
To the Officers, Members, and Friends of Organ- 
ized Labor — Greeting. 

The time is fast approaching when our mem- 
bers and friends will of necessity, because of 
weather conditions, be called upon to make pur- 
chases of gloves of every description. 

Affiliated with the American Federation of 
Labor and with this department is the Glove 
Workers' International Union of America, an 
organization that has been struggling for some 
time to better the hours, wages, and working 
conditions of the men and women engaged in 
that industry. In some sections of the country, 
and particularly in Glovcrsville, N. Y., the manu- 
facturers have antagonized the union in its effort 
to organize their fellow workers. 

Notwithstanding the intense opposition this 
organization has met with in this and other 
places, it has maintained its organization, which, 
while small in numbers, has insisted upon its 
right to organize and maintain decent conditions. 
In accomplishing this it has also been able to 
have the label of its organization adopted by sev- 
eral manufacturers throughout the country. The 
time to assist this organization in furthering the 
sale of gloves made under fair conditions bearing 
the label is NOW. 

Your organization is urgently requested to ap- 
point committees to wait upon dealers in your 
locality, bringing this matter to their attention, 
and giving them the information where gloves 
(both dress and working) can be obtained. 

The organization of Glove Workers consists to 
a large degree of women workers, and they 
should be encouraged and helped. One important 
way in which the assistance they desire can be 
obtained is by insisting that when purchasing 
gloves of any character or material that the 
Union Label of the Glove Workers' International 
Union shall be attached thereto. 

Central Labor Unions, Local Departments, 
Women's Union Label Leagues, Local Unions, 
and all other friends are urgently requested to 
give the subject-matter of this communication 
their active support and assist in building up and 
strengthening this organization. 

Yours fraternally, 

THOMAS F. TRACY. 

Secretary-Treasurer, 
Union Label Trades Department, A. F. of L. 
Washington, D. C, September 24, 1910. 

Gloves, although popularly associated with 
the idea of "glad rags" and "fine feathers," 
are nevertheless articles of very common use 
among all classes of workers. In fact, they 
are almost as commonly used as any other 
article of clothing. A general demand for the 
Glove- Workers' label is therefore as much a 
duty of unionism as is a like demand for the 
union label on any other article. We be- 
speak a conscientious response to the fore- 
going appeal on the part of our readers, not 
only as a matter of justice to the Glove- 
Workers but also as a matter of duty to the 
principle of unionism. 



In scrutinizing the labor record of the 
members of Congress, let it not be forgotten 
that the member who is recorded as "not vo- 
ting" should rightly be regarded as voting 
.-NG.MN'ST labor's interests. 



The Journ.al's adverti.sers are its friends. 
All other friends of the Journal will act ac- 
cordingly. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



MEMBERS AGAINST LABOR. 



The American Federation of Labor has is- 
sued a list of members of the House of Rep- 
resentatives who are especially antagonistic to 
labor measures.* 

The following Representatives are members 
of the Judiciary Committee of the House of 
Representatives. They made no eiTort to ad- 
vance the bills advocated by labor or the 
amendment to the Anti-Trust law, and they 
opposed all efforts to report out a bill granting 
relief from the injunction abuse: 

Parker of New Jersey, Sterling of Illinois, 
Moon of Pennsylvania, Diekema of Michigan, 
Malby of New York, Higgins of Connecticut, 
Goebel of Ohio, Denby of Michigan, Howland 
of Ohio, Nye of Minnesota, Sheffield of Rhode 
Island. 

The following are members of the Commit- 
tee on Labor, House of Representatives, who 
have steadily opposed reporting out the Eight- 
Hour bill, which has been before this commit- 
tee for years : 

Gardner of New Jersey, Bartholdt of Mis- 
souri, Vreeland of New York, Madison of 
Kansas, Taylor of Ohio, Smith of California, 
Hawley of Oregon. 

The following are menibers of the Commit- 
tee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries, of the 
House of Representatives, and who have op- 
posed the seamen in their efforts to have 
enacted remedial measures in their behalf: 

Humphrey of Washington, Henry of Con- 
necticut, Fairchild of New York, Foulkrod of 
Pennsylvania, Sturgiss of West Virginia, Sim- 
mons of New York, Barchfcld of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

These names should be carefully noted by 
the voters in the respective districts. On elec- 
tion day they should be treated as have other 
members equally derelict in other respects — 
that is, they should be defeated in favor of 
candidates who stand for the interests of the 
whole people. 



The San Francisco Chronicle, that erst- 
while champion of Exclusion, has discovered 
a solution of the Hindoo immigration. The 
hookworm's the thing. No need to pass Ex- 
clusion laws to bar out the Hindoo ! Just find 
him guilty of hookworm, and kick him out of 
the country! 

"There was reason enough before to exclude 
them," says the Chronicle, "but no law under 
which it could be done on the simple grounds 
that they were not wanted. That statesman- 
ship would be unwise, indeed, which passed 
an Exclusion law against British subjects." 
Evidently, the Chronicle has been going to a 
school of statesmanship. After a few more 
lessons our contemporary will probably be able 
to discover some other form of disease by vir- 
tue of which we shall be able to solve the 
Asiatic labor problem as it aft'ects other 
classes, without the need of passing any "un- 
wise" legislation ! 



The coming Congressional election will af- 
ford every member of the labor movement an 
opportunity to choose between the candidate 
who stands for the protection of that move- 
ment, and the candidate who stands for its 
prosecution as an "illegal conspiracy in re- 
straint of trade." The voter who chooses the 
latter chooses the path to certain destruction. 



Demand the Garment- Workers' label on all 
articles of clothing — ready-made suits, shirts, 
overalls, aprons, etc. Let us help our sisters 
in their heroic fight against the Chinese, the 
sweatshop and the tenement-house | • 



STATE FEDERATION REPORTS. 
(Continued from Page 2.) 



tutes a standing menace to the conditions gained 
by organization in the mechanical trades. 

The joint committee concurs with the Executive 
Council in recommending that the work of bring- 
ing the laborers throughout the State within the 
.protecting fold of unionism be continued. 

A separate financial account has been kept for 
the work of the joint committee. The Executive 
Council set aside from the Federation's Treasury 
the sum of $200 per month for the work and the 
State Building Trades Council, through Brother 
O. A. Tveitmoe agreed to do likewise. Contri- 
butions have also been made by several Central 
Labor Councils and a number of unions affiliated 
with the San Francisco Labor Council. 

The financial statement of the joint committee's 
work is submitted in the report of the Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

Other Organizing Work. 

Complying with the solicitation of the Sugar 
Workers' Union, No. 10,519, Brother Chas. A. 
Oliva, a member of the latter organization, was 
appointed a special organizer for the sugar work- 
ers employed by the Hawaiian Sugar Refining 
Company at Crockett. Brother Oliva spent sev- 
eral days at Crockett and returned fully con- 
vinced that it was a hopeless undertaking to en- 
deavor to organize those workers openly from 
the outside. While the men employed are dis- 
satisfied with existing conditions, etc., certain no- 
torious San Francisco employment agencies have 
been able to supply the required number of men 
to take the place of those who continually quit 
in disgust. After consulting with officials of the 
Warehouse Workers' Union at Crockett regarding 
the organizing of the plant, a different plan of 
action was agreed upon. 

The Box Makers, Locals Nos. 152 and 225, of 
San Francisco and Oakland, respectively, ap- 
pealed for assistance in organizing the box mak- 
ers at Bay Point. Upon investigation by Organ- 
izer Dale it was found that here again open or- 
ganizing work was out of the question. Further, 
it would be unwise to attempt the organizing of 
only one craft of small numbers, while about 400 
men are employed at that place as mill men, 
lumber handlers, etc. With the proper plans, in- 
telligently worked out and applied, successful or- 
ganizing work can undoubtedly be done at Bay 
Point. In order to accomplish results the va- 
rious crafts interested must work jointly and we 
are of the opinion that further steps should be 
taken to this end. 

Woman's Union Label Leagues. 

The agitation for the Union Label has been 
given a new impetus in California by the forma- 
tion of several Woman's Union Label Leagues. 
The union label is especially adapted to the 
women's sphere of activity in the work of the 
labor movement. As the purchaser of household 
goods, the woman is in a position to extend 
the field of the union label almost without limit. 
It is to be hoped that the Leagues will grow in 
numbers and usefulness, so that the women shall 
thus be enabled to exercise their rightful influence 
as the arbiters of the relations between employer 
and employe. When the women make up their 
minds to consider the price at which a given ar- 
ticle is manufactured, as well as the price at 
which it is offered for sale, the sweat-shop and 
the tenement-house will become a thing of the 
past. 

The activity of the Women's Union Label 
Leagues was demonstrated by the receipt of sev- 
eral inquiries for label goods from various sec- 
tions of the State. 

The Label Section of the San Francisco Labor 
Council, organized during the year, is also doing 
excellent work in general union label agitation. 

The good work already done in this direction 
should be continued and we recommend that the 
Vice-Presidents who will serve during the next 
term be again instructed to pay particular^ atten- 
tion to the formation and the upbuilding of 
Women's Union Label Leagues. 

Electrical Workers' Bills. 

The joint Law and Legislative Committee of 
Electrical Workers' Unions, Nos. 537, 283, 151 
and 633, submitted to the Executive Council three 
bills to be introd'uced at the next session of the 
Legislature. One of these bills pertains to over- 
head construction, the second to underground and 
cable construction, and the third bill provides for 
the appointment of a State Electrical Inspector 
and defines his powers and duties. 

These bills are submitted to the convention, 
with the favorable recommendation of the Ex- 
ecutive Council. 

Official Year Book. 

The question of issuing an official Year Book, 
embodying the proceedings of the convention and 
containing fac-simi]es and descriptions of Union 
Labels and other valuable trade-union literature, 
was discussed at the meeting of the Council held 
on July 31. Brother B. B. Rosenthal submitted 
a proposition agreeing to publish a creditable 
Year Book free of cost to the Federation, his 
compensation to be derived from advertisements 
to be secured by him. The proposition was ac- 
cepted, with the understanding tliat all advertise- 
ments must be submitted for approval to the 
Vice-Presidents of the respective districts in 
(Continued on Page 10.) 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Oct. 17, 1910. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Robert Rollo presiding. Secretary 
reported shipping dull. Balloting for delegates 
to the Detroit convention of the International 
Seamen's Union of America was proceeded with 
and will be concluded at the next regular meet- 
ings held at Headquarters and all Branches. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 

44-46 East St. Pacific Phone Kearny 2228. 
Home Phone J 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 10, 1910. 
Shipping fair. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
122 Alexander St. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 10, 1910. 
Shipping rather dull; prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 10, 1910. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 10, 1910. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping and pros- 
pects poor. 

WALTER MOLLER, Agent. 
22914 Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 141 J. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 10, 1910. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

HARRY COOK, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. 225. 



Portland, Ore., Agency, Oct. 10, 1910. 
Shipping dull. 

D. W. PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 10, 1910. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping slack; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

JOHN W. ERICKSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box Z27 . Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 10, 1910. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. Main 662. 



Honolulu Agency, Oct. 3, 1910. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

CHAS. SORENSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 13, 1910. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Harry Hafford in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping slack. The report of the Quar- 
terly Finance Committee, finding books, stubs, 
bonds, money on hand and in banks correct, was 
read and adopted. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 16, 1910. 
Shipping slow. Nominated officers for the en- 
suing term. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
P. O. Box 1335. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 3, 1910. 
Shipping and prospects medium. Nominated 
officers for the ensuing term. 

ED. BARRY, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Chicago, Oct. 10, 1910. 
Situation good. 

ALEX. McKECHNIE, Sec'y pro tern. 
674 West Madison St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Headquarters, Boston, Mass., Oct. 11, 1910. 
Shipping fair. 

WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary. 
l^A Lewis Street. 



DIED. 

Johan Jalonen, No. 1832, a native -of Finland, 
aged 26, died at San Francisco, Cal., on October 
15, 1910. 

Emil Rosquist, No. 840. a native of Finland, 
aq-ed 32, died at .Seattle, Wash., on October 5, 
1910. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



*^^* 




ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

(Contributed by the Lake Seamen's Unioni.) 




«^>S^ 



ACCIDENTS ON THE LAKES. 



The Steel Trust barge John Sineaton did 
all she knew how on her trip down the 
Lakes last week to prove to her owners 
that there is one thing she needs, and that 
is some one to steer. She smashed into the 
steamer Lakeland, doing considerable dam- 
age, then proceeded down the Lakes until 
she met the Corunna, and smashed into 
her. All three vessels will go to drydock. 

Meanwhile the steamers Harvey H. 
Brown and Dan R. Hanna had a collision, 
just to keep up the percentage. Roth ves- 
sels were disabled. The Leonard P. Miller 
limped into the Soo with crippled steering 
gear (w-orn out by constant grinding) ; the 
Louisiana and the A\'m. S. Mack went 
ashore ; the S. N. Parent in collision with 
the Avon, in Lake Ontario, and the Mari- 
tana, in attempting to pick up her barge. 
Main, off Lorain, picked up the anchor 
chain witli her wheel. The Plain Dealer 
says: 

The Pittsburg Stoamsliip Comiiaiiy's .steamer 
Marit;nia. in attemiJting to i)ick up the barge 
Maia off Lorain early yesterday morning, got the 
Maia's anchor chain caught in her wheel shaft and 
i.s seriously damaged. The Maritana intended to 
tow the Maia to Two Harbors and in attempting 
to pick up the barge ran too close. 

The anchor chain wound around the wheel 
shaft and the Maritana was almost instantly dis- 
abled. Supt. \V. VV. Smith of the Pittsburg 
Steamship Company went to Lorain and took 
charge of the work. He brought a diver with 
him and the tug E. M. Pierce went at once to 
the anchorage of the two boats. 

Dynamite was used to break the anchor chain. 
The ^Llritana was brought into Lorain at 5 
o'clock yesterday with a portion of the anchor 
chain still about her shaft. She was placed in the 
Ainerican Ship Ruilding Company's drydock and 
an inspection will be made tomorrow. 

Detroit, September 23. — For the second time 
on her present trip down the Lakes, the barge 
John Smeaton to-day nearly sunk a steamer in 
collision. The Canadian freighter Corunna, bound 
up encountered the Smeaton in tow of the steamer 
Bessemer, just below the cut in Lake St. Clair. 

.\s they were passing, the Smeaton's steering 
gear went wrong. She took a sheer and bumped 
into the Corunna's port side forward, cutting a 
hole about ten feet long and leaving her anchor 
thrust through the Corunna's side. 

Several plates were started and the Corunna 
began leaking. When she arrived at Ecorse plant 
of the Great Lakes Engineering works she had 
settled so far that the hole torn by the Smeaton 
wMS but a few inches above water. 

The Smeaton was dropped near the Great Lakes 
plant. She was in collision with the passenger 
steamer Lakeland just below Sault Ste. Marie. 

Altogether, I think we may call the "Hel- 
fare" sailors (?) a succe.ss so far as their 
work against the Lake Carriers' Associa- 
tion vessel property is concerned. Such 
work as this will surely soon disgust the 
owners and help them to see that they can- 
not man their vessels with farmers. 

The package-freight steamer Bethlehem, 
of the Lehigh Valley line, went ashore on 
South Manitou in a dense fog recently. She 
is reported to be in bad shape. The Reid 
Wrecking Company was awarded the con- 
tract for floating her. The crew are safe. 



NOTICE TO MASTERS. 



Vesselmen have received notice from the 
Lighthouse Department of the installation 
about September 15 at White Shoal light sta- 
tion. Lake Michigan, of a first-class auto- 
matic compressed air siren to sound as fol- 
lows : Blast of two seconds followed by si- 
lent interval eighteen seconds ; then blast 
three seconds followed by silent interval of 
thirty-seven seconds. 



UNION MAN PERSECUTED. 



There is probably no clearer example of 
the vindictive hate of the Steel Trust hire- 
lings for a union inan than that shown by 
the persecution of Comrade Joseph Hagan, 
of the Lake Seamen's Union. Comrade Ha- 
gan is well and favorably known in Con- 
neaut, and hardly a 1)usiness man in the 
city or harbor but is wilUng to vouch for 
him. Yet he has been arrested several times 
on trumped-up charges, and each time the 
case has been dismissed. 

Now he has been arrested in New York 
and brought to Conneaut on a charge of 
"assault with intent to kill," simply because 
he declined to let an imported strikebreaker 
named Hanson come into the picket shack 
and tear out the buzzer. 

Hanson has been driving a team in Du- 
luth. He is not a citizen of this country. 
He is an imported scab, pure and simple. 
Yet for this man a citizen may be thrown in 
jail, unjustly punished, not because he re- 
fu.sed to let the scab beat him up, but be- 
cause he is a union man. and stands for his 
comrades and himself against the union- 
hating Steel Trust. 

W. H. Jenkins. 

Conneaut, O. 



STEAMER TO BE ENLARGED. 



It is announced by T. F. Newman, gen- 
eral manager of the C. & B. line, that when 
the steamer City of Erie is laid up for the 
winter she will have thirty-five staterooms 
added and she will be otherwise improved. 

The .steamers of this line will continue to 
operate to Buffalo until December 1, at 
which time the season will close. 

T. F. Newman, general manager of the 
C. & B. line, said recently that the line had 
done good business throughout the season 
in both passenger and freight. 

"If the business continues through the fall 
months as good as it has been up to this 
time, we will have had an exceptionally 
good season," said Newman. "I am told 
that ill the passenger and freight lines have 
had big seasons." 



NOTICE TO MASTERS. 



Colonel John Millis, United States en- 
gineer, has issued the following warning: 
The dismantled fish tug Knapp sank in the 
channel at Ashtabula Harbor August 3L and 
forms a dangerous obstruction to naviga- 
tion on the east side of the channel, 700 feet 
north of the highway bridge. Vessels should 
keep to the west. 



The steamer W. S. Mack of Cleveland is 
ashore on the north side of Poverty Island, 
Green Bay. Three of her tanks are punc- 
tured but it is not known how far she is 
out. The steamer is reported to be resting 
easy. 

The Mack was bound from Escanaba to 
Lake Erie with a cargo of ore when she 
stranded. The wrecker Favorite of the 
Great Lakes Towing Company has been 
ordered to the Mack. The Mack is owned 
by the Lake Erie Transportation Company 
of Cleveland. 



AUGUST LAKE LEVELS. 



The United States Lake Survey reports 
the stages of the Great Lakes for the month 
of .August, 1910, as follows: 

Feet above tide- 
Lakes, water, New York. 

Superior 601 .96 

Michigan-Huron 580.35 

Erie 572.09 

Ontario 246.05 

Lake Superior is 0.07 foot higher than 
last month, 0.44 foot lower than a year ago, 
0.99 foot below the average stage of Au- 
gust of the last ten years, 1.39 feet below 
the high stage of .August, 1899, and 0.08 foot 
above the low stage of August, 1892. It 
will probably rise 0.1 foot in September. 

Lakes Michigan-Huron are 0.15 foot lower 
than last month, 0.70 foot lower than a year 
ago, 0.85 foot below the average stage of 
.August of the last ten years, 3.16 feet below 
the high stage of August, 1876, and 0.47 
foot below the low stage of August, 1896. 
They will probably fall 0.2 foot during Sep- 
tember. 

Lake Erie is 0.26 foot lower than last 
month, 0.71 foot lower than a year ago, 0.62 
foot below the average stage of August of 
the past ten years, 2.02 feet below the high 
stage of .August, 1876, and 0.71 foot above 
the low stage of August, 1895. It will 
jirobably fall 0.3 foot during September. 

Lake Ontario is 0.24 foot lower than last 
month, 0.77 foot lower than a year ago, 0.54 
foot lower than the average stage of August 
of the past ten years, 1.90 feet below the 
high stage of August, 1908, and 1.70 feet 
above the low stage of August, 1895. It 
will probably fall 0.4 foot during September. 



CAPTAIN PROMOTED. 



Captain John C. .Ackerman, for eight years 
a master in the Pere Marquette carferry 
line, left Ludington on September 1 for 
Toledo to accept the position of marine 
superintendent for the Ann Arbor line. 
Captain Ackerman will succeed Captain 
Fred Robinson, and will have charge of a 
fleet of four carferries with headquarters at 
Frankfort. He is a thoroughly practical 
carferry navigator and a capable executive. 
He formerly served as master in the Ann 
-Arbor line, and later .sailed the Nyack of the 
Crosby line. He is succeeded as captain 
of the carferry 20 by First Officer John 
Crawford. Captain Ackerman was held in 
very high regard by the Pere Marquette 
people. 



OUT ON SURVEY WORK. 



The steamer Search, of the United States 
Lake Survey, formerly the yacht Enquirer, 
has been .sent to replace steamer No. 2, 
which now has a party at work in the lower 
end of Lake Michigan. The expedition on 
the Search is in charge of Thomas Russell, 
who will take magnetic observations en 
route and after transferring to steamer No. 
2 will continue that work in Lakes ^lichi- 
gan and Superior, under direction of Fred 
G. Ray, principal assistant engineer. 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



TOWNSEND MAY INQUIRE. 



It will cost about $5,000 to repair the fuel 
lighter Tyson, which was overturned by the 
swells from a passing steamer at her dock 
at Amherstburg last week. In addition the 
owners will lose two or three months' earn- 
ings while the boat is undergoing repairs. 
The battery of hoppers was smashed and 
scattered along the beach, and the star- 
board bulwarks were entirely torn off. 

Colonel Townsend, United States engi- 
neer at Detroit, says he will conduct an in- 
vestigation into the unusual manner in 
which the lighter was wrecked, if it is de- 
sired. It has been intimated that the 
steamer whose swells capsized the Tyson 
was going altogether too fast, and Colonel 
Townsend says some action must be taken 
against undue speed at the Limekiln Cross- 
ing. 

Many vesselmen, however, are of tlic 
opinion that the Tyson's peculiar construc- 
tion caused the mishap. They claim she 
was top-heavy, and that little disturbance 
was necessary to put her ofif her balance. 
The wrecker J. E. Mills and a lighter are 
now at work trying to recover the cargo, 
and to save what wreckage is floating about. 



A HUSTLER HONORED. 



Named in honor of the President of the 
Ashtabula Chamber of Commerce, in recog- 
nition of the efificient work of the president 
and members of that organization, the tug 
fleet at that port was recently augmented 
by the addition of the tug R. P. Reiden- 
bach. The new tug is constructed of steel. 
She sits lower in the water than the wooden 
tugs and it is expected will be of greater 
power. She is 79 feet over all and IJVz feet 
beam. When she arrived in port she was 
greeted by the blowing of every shop and 
locomotive whistle in port, while both shores 
of the main river were lined with specta- 
tors. The new tug belongs to the fleet of 
the Great Lakes Towing Company. 

The recognition of the Chamber of Com- 
merce shown by naming this new tug for 
President Reidenbach is well deserved. 
Never has a chamber of commerce worked 
harder and more effectively for a city. 
Among its greatest achievements have been 
the bringing of the new million-dollar ship- 
yards to Ashtabula, work on the construc- 
tion of which is already in progress. 



LARGE SUM FOR SHIP PLANT. 



Voting took place at Owen Sound on Au- 
gust 29 on two by-laws for industrial pur- 
poses, and both were carried. One by-law 
was to grant $100,000 toward a shipbuilding 
and drydock plant, which is being floated in 
Great Britain, and which will involve an ex- 
penditure of $1,000,000. The town will 
bonus the proposition for $50,000 and take 
stock for a similar amount. The arranging 
for capital is in the hands of a prominent 
English engineer, who has been closely iden- 
tified with admiralty and other engineering 
projects in Great Britain. The Government 
has given its assurance of the subsidy of 3 
per cent, interest on the investment, the lo- 
cation in Owen Sound harbor being fa- 
vored owing to the short season during 
which navigation is closed there, the aver- 
age of the past ten years not being over ten 
weeks. 



STRIKE 

ON THE GREAT LAKES 

COMRADES: 

The strike of Sailors, Firemen and Cooks 
on the Great Lakes is still on. We appeal 
to all seafaring men to assist us in persuad- 
ing seamen to stay away from the Lakes 
during this strike. 

Any reports that the strike has been set- 
tled are false. 

The Seamen of the Great Lakes are sticking to- 
gether solidly, and will keep up the battle for 
freedom and decent conditions until the fight is 
won. "God Almighty hates a quitter." (So do 
we.) 

Lend a hand, comrades, by inducing seamen to 
stay away from the Lakes while the strike is on. 
Yours fraternally, 

LAKE DISTRICT, 

International Seamen's Union of America. 

STRIKE ON THE GREAT LAKES 
KEEP AWAY! 

CHANGES IN LIGHTS. 



The following changes in the lighthouse 
service on the Great Lakes are announced : 
The intensity and characteristics of tne light 
at White Shoal light station, at the north- 
erly end of Lake Michigan, changed Sep- 
tember 1 from a single white flash every sec- 
ond second, and from an oil light through a 
lens lantern at a height of 115 feet above the 
water, to an incandescent oil vapor light 
shown through a second order lens at a 
height of 125 feet above the water. The 
light will be visible in clear weather about 
twenty miles, the observer's eye being about 
15 feet above the water. The tower is 
white, surmounted by a silver gray alum- 
inum lantern and dome rising from the top 
of a concrete pier. A black narrow ring 
around the tower will show at a height of 
about 38 feet above the water. No other 
changes will be made. 

Another change announced by the hydro- 
graphic office is the establishment of a 
third-class can buoy in about 30 feet of wa- 
ter on the westerly edge of the easterly side 
of Chequamegon Bay, opposite Washburn, 
Wis. 

A permanent light will be established on 
the Rock of Ages light station. Lake Su- 
perior, September 10. The light will be of 
the second order, showing a double white 
flash every 10 seconds. The illuminant will 
be an incandescent oil vapor. During the 
installation of this apparatus a fixed red 
lens lantern light will be exhibited. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



ERIE CANAL TRAFFIC. 



The shipments of lumber and gravel over 
the Erie Canal from the Tonawandas last 
month show a decrease. For August 12,- 
075,000 feet of lumber were forwarded from 
the local port as against 10,752,626 feet for 
the corresponding month of last season. 
The shipments of sand for the month just 
closed amounted to 13,632,000 pounds, an 
increase of 32,000 pounds over August of 
1909. A total of 2,792,440 pounds of pig 
iron was forwarded in August of last year, 
\vhile none was recorded last month. 



Charles Bourroughs, No. 2745, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by his father. 

Findlay J. McDonald, No. 5499, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by John D. Mc- 
Donald, Highland Park, Mich. 

Comrade Henry Blaschke. Any one 
knowing the above-named comrade please 
communicate with Jno. Rook, Jr., 2564 E. 
55th St., Cleveland. 

Roy Person, No. 12522, L. S. U., is in- 
quired for by his sister. Miss Hazel Person, 
225 Chisholm street, Alpena, Mich. 

William Young, a marine fireman, aged 
50 years, last heard of twelve years ago, is 
inquired for by his sister. Address, Mrs. 
Anna M. Mills, 644 W. 61st street, Chicago, 
111. 



DAMAGED BY FIRE. 



Sparks set fire to two of the Whirley 
machines on the B. & O. docks at Lorain 
on August 15. The houses were burned 
from the machines, but the damage to ma- 
chinery was slight. Estimated loss $800. 

The company has now five Whirley ma- 
chines with which to unload ore. Repairs 
will be made and damaged machines will 
be in operation in a few days. The blaze 
was extinguished by the tugs Excelsior and 
Harding of the Great Lakes Towing Com- 
pany. 



Comrade Martin J. Carroll is confined in 
the Marine Hospital at Cleveland, with a 
broken leg. Marty has the sincere sympathy 
of his many friends. 



For fair products of all kinds patronize 
the Journal's advertisers. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

674 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Teleplione, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone 240 South. 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 21 High Street 

Telephone Bell 175 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 1890. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

AGENCIES: 

DETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 Third Street 

Telephone, New Phone, Broad 155 L. 

BAY CITY, Mich 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96) King Street 

ERIE, Pa 328 German Street 

Telephone Bell 699 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR. 922 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, 111 113 92nd Street 

Telephone 2853 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 



HOSPITAL AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 
CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



RELIEF 
Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Mich. 
Houghton, Mich. 
liUdlngton, Mich. 
Man'iiee, Mich. 



STATIONS. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Mich. 
Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo. O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



STATE FEDERATION REPORTS. 

(Continued from Page 7.) 



which the advertiser is located. All copy, other 
than advertisements, to be furnished by the Sec- 
retary-Treasurer. It was also agreed that each 
affiliated union and each delegate should be sup- 
plied with a copy of the convention proceedings 
without any advertising matter attached. 

This arrangement will save the Federation an 
annual expense of about two hundred dollars. 
In addition, several thousand more copies of the 
Proceedings will be printed than have been here- 
tofore, thus acquainting a greater number of 
trade-unionists and the public at large with the 
nature of our work. 

Boycotts. 

At the request of Boot and Shoe Workers, No. 
216, of San Francisco, the Council endorsed the 
boycott previously levied by the San Francisco 
and Oakland Labor Councils against the firm 
of Cahn, Nickelburg & Co. This concern has 
for some time past practiced a policy of dis- 
crimination against the members of the Boot and 
Shoe Workers' Union which finally became un- 
bearable and resulted in a strike and subsequent 
boycott. We recommend the endorsement of this 
boycott to the convention. 

The Musicians' Union, No. 346, of Santa Cruz, 
appealed to the Executive Council for assistance 
in adjusting their differences with the Santa Cruz 
Beach Company, which firm has in its employ a 
non-union band and orchestra. Several attempts 
were made to arrive at an understanding with 
the manager of the company, but in vain. At 
the meeting of the Council, held oh September 
25, it was decided to recommend to the conven- 
tion that the Santa Cruz Beach Company be de- 
clared unfair to organized labor. 

American Federation of Labor Convention. 

The call for the convention of the American 
Federation of Labor has been received and your 
Executive Council unanimously agreed to rec- 
ommend to the convention that we do not send 
a delegate. 

Your Council arrived at this conclusion, having 
in mind that the sum of $400 can be used to 
better advantage in organizing and strengthening 
unions than in the sending of one deleagte, who 
has only one vote in a convention which has a 
voting strength exceeding 15,000. 

Asiatic Exclusion. 

The history of the Asiatic Exclusion movement 
in California was enriched during this year with 
the publication of Labor Commissioner Macken- 
zie's special report. Of course, Mr. Mackenzie's 
opinion that Japanese immigration was desirable 
is merely an echoe of the desires harbored by a 
few large employing and transportation interests 
who never did care about the future of our civil- 
ization as long as they make immediate personal 
gain. 

The Mackenzie pro-Japanese report has been so 
unanimously and vigorously repudiated and con- 
demned by all classes of citizens that it seems al- 
most needless to add to the long chain of de- 
nunciations already heaped upon California's un- 
worthy labor commissioner. 

Fortunately, it is not even conceivable that 
Asiatic Exclusion should become an issue in the 
politics of our State. All political parties have 
again expressed themselves emphatically for Ex- 
clusion and there can be no doubt whatever that 
public sentiment is as unanimous to-day as it has 
always been. Nevertheless, the need of active, 
concerted and statewide effort to secure the ex- 
clusion of Asiatics is as pressing to-day as at 
any period in the history of the State. In some 
respects the danger from Asiatic immigration is 
greater and the need of exclusion legislation more 
imperative than ever before. 

In addition to the dangers arising from the 
continual influx of Chinese and Japanese, we are 
now confronted with a new form of Asiatic im- 
migration in the form of Hindus. It is estimated 
that more than 10,000 members of this race have 
already entered the State, and almost every 
steamer from the Orient and northern Coast 
points brings a large addition to their numbers. 

As labor is the first and chief sufferer by the 
immigration of Asiatics, so labor must be first 
and foremost in the work of excluding them 
from our shores. Only by national legislation 
can this be accomplished. In this task the first 
and absolutely imperative condition is thorough 
orgnniaztion in the form of an Exclusion League, 
with branches in every section of the State. The 
work already accomplished in establishing 
branches of the League will be reported upon by 
the respective Vice-Presidents. A monthly maga- 
zine, named "The White Man," and devoted ex- 
clusively to the work of arousing public sentiment 
against Asiatic immigration, is now published in 
San Francisco. This publication deserves the 
support of all who believe that California should 
remain a white man's country. 

In compliance with the instructions of the last 
convention a circular 'letter was sent to each af- 
filiated organization urging upon them to form 
an .Anti-Japanese League in its particular trade 
in order to combat Japanese competition in a 
manner best suited to each particular trade. 

Political Action. 

In April a communication was received from 
Frank Morrison, Secretary of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, relating to the political program 
of the American Federation of Labor which is, 



to secure the election to the Congress of the 
United States and State Legislatures of as many 
members of the trade-unions as possible on the 
Republican and Democratic tickets, or independ- 
ent of cither dominant oarty, if an opportunity 
presents itself. It was stated further that the 
"Labor Group" of the present Congress is com- 
posed of ten Representatives as follows: 

Hon. Wm. B. Wilson (Democrat), Pennsyl- 
vania, Miner. 

Hon. Thos. D. Nicholls (Democrat), Pennsyl- 
vania, Miner. 

Hon. Carl C. Anderson (Democrat), Ohio, Mu- 
sician. 

Hon. Jas. T. McDermott (Democrat), Illinois, 
Commercial Telegrapher. 

Hon. John A. Martin (Democrat), Colorado, 
Firemen. 

Hon. Isaac R. Sherwood (Democrat), Ohio, 
Typographical. 

Hon. Wm. Hughes (Democrat), New Jersey, 
Honorary Member. 

Hon. Wm. D. Jamieson (Democrat), Iowa, 
Typographical. 

Hon. Wm. J. Cary (Republican), Wisconsin, 
Commercial Telegrapher. 

Hon. Arthur P. Murphy (Republican), Missouri, 
Railroad Trainman. 

The records of the eight California Represen- 
tatives on important labor measures in Congress 
were received later and it was decided to give 
every possible publicity to these records by fur- 
nishing a copy to each trade-union and news- 
paper in the respective districts. This plan was 
carried out in full in the Second and Fifth dis- 
tricts and there can be no doubt that the defeat 
of labor's notorious enemy, Duncan McKinlay, 
was to some extent brought about through the 
free publication of his self-made record. 

In the remaining districts, wherever there was 
any opposition, the Central Labor Councils and 
the labor press were furnished with the records 
of the incumbents. 

In compliance with the recommendations of 
the Labor Representation Committee of the 
American Federation of Labor to center our ef- 
forts upon certain measures in which the rights 
and liberties of the workers are essentially in- 
volved, your Executive Council directed the Sec- 
retary to communicate with Republican and Dem- 
ocratic candidates for Congress, other than in- 
cumbents, with a view of obtaining their views 
on the following bills pending in Congress: 

H. R. 25188 — Relief from injunction abuse and 
amendment to the Sherman Anti-Trust Act. 
H. R. 15441— Eight-Hour Bill. H. R. 1200(X- 
Convict Labor Bill. 

Copies of these bills were enclosed in the let- 
ters sent to candidates. 

In concluding the political report your Execu- 
tive Council earnestly hopes that the trade- 
unionists of California will closely scrutinize the 
records of all candidates and cast their votes for 
"men" irrespective of their party label. 

We recommend that the work undertaken in 
giving liberal publicity to the records of our Rep- 
resentatives in Congress be continued to the end 
that those who have been tried and found wanting 
and those who have failed to state their position 
on pending measures which most vitally affect 
labor, be retained at home. 

Respectfully submitted, 

D. D. SULLIVAN, 

President. 
PAUL SCHARRENBERG, 

Secretary-Treasurer. 
CHRIS. PLOEGER, 
TOM C. SEAWARD, 
M. T. MURRAY, 
R. WIAND, 
THOMAS WRIGHT, 
HARRY MENKE, 
D. T. MURRAY, 
T. K. THOMPSON, 
L. B. LE.WITT, 
JOHN W. ERICKSEN, 

Vice-Presidents. 



LABOR'S KONOMIC PLATPORM. 



REPORT OF SECRETARY-TREASURER. 

Union Labor Temple, Los Angeles. Cal., 
October 3, 1910. 
To the Officers and Delegates to the Eleventh 
Annual Convention of the California State Fed- 
eration of Labor. 
Fellow Unionists: 

In submitting the annual report of the business 
transacted through the office of the Secretary- 
Treasurer it gives me considerable satisfaction 
and pleasure to be able to state that the past year 
has been the most prosperous in the history of 
the State Federation. During the year the 
numerical strength of the Federation has almost 
been doubled, thereby permitting us to take up 
more work in all avenues of endeavor and in- 
creasing the prestige of our movement to the 
material benefit of the workers throughout our 
State. 

Unionism Thrives Despite Opposition. 

The year just past has been an eventful period 
in the forward march of organized labor in Cali- 
fornia. 

The world-wide battle of man against money- 
power has been and is being fought by the toilers 
of our State with the same faith and determina- 
tion as was exhibited by our predecessors in the 
movement, who were at one time looked upon as 
criminals for daring to advocate the now almost 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. .'\ strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions _ as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interest for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 44-46 East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C, lL'2 Alexander St., P. O. Box 
1365. 

T A COMA. Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash.. 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash.. 114 Quincy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND. Ore., 51 Union Ave. 

EUREKA. Cal.. 227 First St., P. O. Box 327. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal.. P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU. H. T.. Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Stf., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 1408% Western Ave.. P. O. Box 
875. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 51 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 209-210 Powell Building, P. O. 
Box 1335. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN. Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN. Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Fin. Wash., P. O. Box fi. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING. Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG. Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE. Wash.. 1312 Western Ave., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATMEN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
S.\CRAMENTO. Cal., 200 M St. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places: 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. $• Vy. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



universally recognized principles of trades- 
unionism. 

No progressive movement has been attacked 
and denounced more than trades-unionism, but 
the more bitter the villification of our enemies, 
the more our movement has grown in strength, 
and sooner or later the reactionary clique of 
would-be labor crushers in Los Angeles will 
learn that although it evidently has at its com- 
mand the services of the Mayor, the City Council, 
the newspapers and last but not least the judges, 
in the end it will be the same old story as was 
related by Potter Palmer, a large employer of 
Chicago, who said: "For ten years I made as 
desperate a fight against organized labor as was 
ever made by mortal man. It cost me consider- 
ably more than a million dollars to learn that 
there is no labor so skilled, so intelligent, so 
faithful as that which is governed by an organ- 
ization whose officials are well-balanced, level- 
headed men. I now employ none but organized 
labor, and never have the least trouble, each be- 
lieving that one has no right to oppress the 
other." 

A more recent example of the futility of waging 
war against organized labor is the case of the 
Buck's Stove and Range Company. Mr. Van 
Cleave, President of the Buck's Company (now 
deceased), wasted the last years of his life in a 
vain endeavor to disrupt the various labor or- 
ganizations whose members were employed by 
his concern. The now famous history of this 
case, and the injunction and contempt proceed- 
ings in connection with same is well known to 
trade-unionists and the publi'c everywhere and 
requires no comment in this report. Let us hope 
that the doting old man who leads the forces of 
union busters in Los Angeles will see the error 
of his ways while he is still among us. 

Government by Injunction. 

Our movement has stood for justice since its 
inception — not the brand of justice that is of late 
dispensed by the "Injunction Judge" who attempts 
to take from us the sacred rights of free speech 
and free press, who has in fact enjoined us from 
exercising practically every privilege guaranteed 
us under the Constitution, except, perhaps, to 
breathe — no, we respectfully but firmly protest 
against that brand of justice. Moreover, we will 
continue to voice our protests against govern- 
ment by injunction and endavor to establish 
equality before the law, using every honorable 
and legitimate effort in obtaining results. 

Organizing Migratory Labor. 

During the year we have begun to organize the 
men who are sometimes called unskilled, common 
or migratory laborers. No more important, neces- 
sarj' and far-reaching work has ever been under- 
taken by the Federation. There are thousands of 
these workers in the State and their lot and 
station in life has reached a truly deplorable 
stage, solely due to the lack of any kind of self- 
help or organization. However, this phase of 
the Federation's work as well as the other 
branches of activity are dealt with in the Execu- 
tive Council's report and I will therefore not 
dwell upon it further, except to refer to the sep- 
arate financial statement relating to this work, 
which will be found elsewhere in this report. 
My firm conviction is that labor will never be 
thoroughly organized until the man at the bottom 
of the industrial heap — the man upon whose back 
rests the whole industrial structure — is brought 
within the protecting folds of the organized labor 
movement. 

Publicity for Trade-Unionism. 

It has been stated that the principles of trade- 
unionism are now almost universally recognized. 
This is in a large measure due to the intelligent 
dissemination of genuine labor literature through 
our labor press. Unfortunately, trade-unionism is 
still quite often judged by some non-essential 
matter which is really only incidental to the 
movement. For this reason and many others, we 
should strive to secure the widest publicity for 
our principles, past attainments and aspirations 
for the future. The labor press of California has 
been furnished with all literature issued by the 
Federation during the year. Occasionally, special 
matter was prepared for these journals, and while 
dealing with this subject I would be ungrateful 
indeed if I failed to acknowledge the many cour- 
tesies and friendly assistance rendered by the 
labor papers of our State. 

That it pays to advertise is well understood 
in America, and there are many sources from 
which are distributed the misrepresentations of 
our opponents. Let us therefore give every pub- 
licity to our movement and spread the propaganda 
of trade-unionism consistently and persistently 
whenever and wherever the opportunity presents 
itself. 

While dealing with publicity for trade-unionism 
I will not fail to note the publication during the 
year of "A History of California Labor Legisla- 
tion, with a Sketch of the San Francisco Labor 
Movement," by Professor Lucilc Eaves, a woman 
who has for many years made a practical and 
sympathetic study of the labor movement of Cali- 
fornia. This book contains a careful record of 
all legislation in California bearing upon the 
problems of the wage-earners and traces the cir- 
cumstances that gave rise to the demands for 
labor laws, thus making the book of peculiar 
value to our organizations. 

Another valuable book published during the 
year is the report of Special Labor Commissioner 
Harris Weinstock, who traveled for a period of 



fifteen months and investigated the labor laws 
and conditions of many foreign countries. While 
I can not concur with Mr. Weinstock's recom- 
mendations for proposed legislation which will 
in his opinion lessen strikes and lockouts, the 
book contains so much valuable information on 
the subject of arbitration and conciliation in labor 
disputes that I earnestly recommend a careful 
reading of same. 

Convention Proceedings. 

A complete file of convention proceedings is a 
valued and necessary part of the records of the 
Federation. All the proceedings in tlie office of 
Federation at the time of the San Francisco 
conflagration in 1906 were destroyed. During 
the year it has been my good fortune to secure a 
complete set of the Federation's convention pro- 
ceedings. The ten booklets have been bound in 
two volumes and are now available at all times 
to any one desiring to refer to the work of the 
Federation during past years. 

The Federation is indebted to the following 
trade-unionists, who either furnished copies of 
the proceedings or assisted in securing same: 
Frank Cooke of Sacramento, F. J. Bonnington, 
W. J. French and Walter Macarthur of San Fran- 
cisco. 

Securing New Affiliations. 

The last Convention adopted the following 
resolution: 

"Resolved, That the incoming Executive Coun- 
cil be instructed to make every effort to urge 
upon locals throughout the State, not at present 
affiliated with the State Federation of Labor, to 
join the Federation, and thus contribute their 
share to the necessary expense of organizing the 
migratory laborers of the State." 

In compliance with the foregoing, every effort 
was made to obtain results. A letter with other 
literature enclosed was sent to each unaffiliated 
union inviting them to join the Federation. 
Personal solicitations were made and numerous 
union meetings visited and addressed. In this 
connection I desire to thank the Vice-Presidents 
and other trade-unionists for valuable assistance 
rendered in this work. Brother John O. Walsh, 
Chairman of the Organizing Committee of the 
San Francisco Labor Council, deserves particular 
commendation for untiring services rendered 
whenever called upon. 

There is still much work to be done in this 
respect and I feel certain that nearly every one 
of the unions not yet within the fold can be in- 
duced to affiliate, providing the organizers and 
officers of our local unions and central councils 
that are affiliated will continue to co-operate with 
the officers of the Federation in this work. 

Once in a great while the statement is made 
that not sufficient benefit is received from affilia- 
tion with the Federation. This is precisely the 
same argument as that made by the non-union 
man who contends that because of his superior 
skill or for some other reason he does not need 
to join hands with his fellow workers in securing 
a living wage and fair working conditions. 

Surely, there can be no doubt that a Federation 
of Labor is as necessary to the success of the 
labor movement as is the union to each trade. 

Employers' Liability and Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Laws. 

We are all aware of the fact that this republic is 
the greatest, richest and most powerful on earth. 
But the average citizen of our land is just be- 
ginning to learn that we are away behind other 
civilized countries in the matter of employers' 
liability and workmen's compensation laws. A 
casual study of foreign laws on this subject is 
sufficient to prove that any one of these laws 
would be better for the American workingman 
than the present laws of the United States. 

With a view of securing specific relief from our 
antiquated principles of law relating to compensa- 
tion for those injured while earniTig their liveli- 
hood, the United States Congress and several 
States have recently created commissions whose 
duty it is to make a thorough investigation of 
the subject and to recommend such changes in 
the existing law as will make it less difficult to 
secure adequate recovery for injury sustained in 
industrial accidents. This is one step in the right 
direction which will help to bring about certain 
very much needed changes in this deplorable 
situation. 

Statistics recently compiled by William Hard 
and published in Everybody's Magazine, set forth 
that in eleven years the employers of labor in 
the United States paid nearly $100,000,000 as pre- 
mium for employers' liability insurance to pro- 
tect themselves against lawsuits. Of this amount 
less than one-third, or about thirty million dol- 
lars, was paid in claims to injured workmen. 
Statistics compiled by the New York Bureau of 
Labor show that for one year the premiums paid 
by employers aggregated ' $4,300,000, of which 
sum but $1,400,000 was actually paid in aid of 
injured workmen. 

The foregoing figures clearly demonstrate that 
the present system is wasteful, in addition to 
being inhuman and antiquated. 

The American Federation of Labor, at its last 
convention, recommended to all State Federa- 
tions to secure copies of bills drafted by 
experienced men at the instance of the 
.\merican Federation of Labor, in order that 
there may be uniformity throughout the country 
in endeavoring to secure this species of legisla- 
tion. The American Federation of Labor bill, in- 
tended for State legislation, is published here- 



with, with the necessary explanations for general 
information. 

Direct Legislation. 

The Initiative and Referendum and Right of 
Recall have been incorporated in the platform 
of both the Republican and Democratic parties 
of California for the first time. Thus we may 
reasonably hope that the voters will soon be 
given an opportunity to vote for an amendment 
incorporating direct legislation into the Constitu- 
tion of the State of California. 

With the Initiative and Referendum embodied 
in the Constitution we could have laws enacted 
which are now greatly needed. Legislators 
would certainly pay more attention to the just 
demands of Labor, when their refusal would be 
met with the Initiative and Referendum. 



REPORT OF MEMBERSHIP. 

Labor Councils in good standing Oct. 1, 

1909 12 

Local Unions in good standing Oct. 1, 1909 151 

Local Unions reinstated during the year... 3 

Local Unions affiliated during the year.... 95 

261 

Disbanded or suspended during the year... 5 

Organizations in good standing Sept. 24, 

1910 256 

Total membership approximately 45,000 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Following is a summary of the receipts and 
expenditures from September 28, 1909, to Septem- 
ber 24, 1910, on which latter date the books of 
the office were closed: 

Receipts. 

Affiliation Fee $ 95.00 

Per Capita Tax 3,943.76 

Total Receipts $4,038.76 

Disbursements. 

San Rafael Convention $ 479.65 

Executive Council 193.80 

Office Expenses 91.70 

Organizing 1,045.80 

Postage and Mailing ; 95.43 

Printing 306.80 

Rent 150.00 

Salaries 600.00 

Political Activity 51.2'! 

Miscellaneous 130.00 

Total Disbursements $3,144.43 

Recapitulation. 

Balance on hand Sept. 28, 1909 $1,151.46 

Total Receipts for twelve months 4,038.76 

$5,190.22 
Total Disbursements 3,144.43 

Balance on hand Sept. 26, 1910 $2,045.79 

In conclusion, I cannot refrain from stating 
that the Federation is under many obligations to 
the members of the Executive Council, who have, 
without compensation, devoted their time and 
energy to our cause. I have at all times had the 
benefit of the long and varied trade-union ex- 
perience of President Sullivan, whose counsel 
and advice has always been placed at my service. 
Likewise, the other members of the Executive 
Council, and the organizers. Brothers Dale and 
Thompson, have never failed to act promptly 
and energetically when called upon to perform 
work for the Federation. To these brothers, and 
to all others who have rendered assistance, I 
desire to express my sincere appreciation for 
their faithful and efficient co-operation and as- 
sistance extended to me in the Federation's 
work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

P.A.UL SCHARRENBERG. 

Secretary-Treasurer. 



ACCIDENT INSURANCE IN NORWAY. 



In an,swer to an inquiry, Consul R. M. 
Rasmussen, of Bergen, reports that the law 
of July 27, 1894, makes accident insurance 
compulsory in factories and trades employ- 
ing a certain numbci- of work people, but 
that no statistics relative thereto have been 
published since 1906. For the years 1904- 
1906 the number insured was 135,146, and 
the number of industrial accidents was 9,- 
756, as follows: Fatal, 248; annual (perma- 
nent), 1,883; temporary, 7,625. Compensa- 
tion for injuries sustained in 1906 was as 
follows : Annuities, $300,891 ; other expen- 
ses, $81,481; total, $382,372. There are no 
old-age pension or insurance laws in Nor- 
way. 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




On October 6 and 7 there were 
eleven new cases of cholera and six 
deaths from the epidemic in Naples. 

A Lisbon dispatch to a news 
agency at London says that Great 
Britain has recognized the republic of 
Portugal. 

The official report of the cholera 
situation in Italy shows that there 
were twenty-four new cases and eight 
deaths on October 11. 

Waldemer Poulsen, the Danish in- 
ventor, has succeeded in lighting in- 
candescent lamps by the wireless 
transmission of an electric current. 

The steamship Terra Nova, which 
sailed from London on June 1, with 
the Scott Antarctic expedition on 
board, has arrived at Melbourne, Aus- 
tralia. 

The fishing steamer Senator Holt- 
hufen collided with and sank the 
Swedish bark Diana off Cuxhaven on 
October 13. Seven of the Diana's 
crew were drowned. 

The step of the new Government in 
Portugal was the publication of an 
official decree ordering all religious 
bodies in Portugal to leave the coun- 
try within twenty-four hours. 

A news dispatch from Rome says 
that a message from Ibrahim Bey 
from Constantinople announces that 
the revolution has broken out at Scu- 
tari, and that it is spreading through- 
out Albania. 

The French Government has de- 
cided to admit Anierican potatoes, 
which have been barred out of France 
since 1875 on the ground that they 
were infected with a disease danger- 
ous to French potatoes. 

An official note was issued at Mad- 
rid on October 13, announcing ad- 
vices from all parts of Spain indi- 
cated there had been no demonstra- 
tions of any account to commemorate 
the death of Ferrer and no disorders. 

The Greek Cabinet, of which M. 
Dragoumis is Premier, resigned on 
October 12. The Ministry was formed 
on January 31 last. The resignation 
was due both to the complications 
with Turkey and to internal dissen- 
sion. 

Subsidies to steamship companies, 
as contained in the Russian budget 
estimates of the Ministry of Com- 
merce for 1911, amount to $1,822,000, 
of which $802,000 goes to the volun- 
teer fleet maintaining lines to Amer- 
ican and Far Eastern ports. 

Spanish Premier Canalejas de- 
clares that the Government was con- 
vinced there already are too many 
members of religious orders in Spain 
and that it could not tolerate the im- 
migration of those expelled from Por- 
tugal by order of the Provisional 
Government. 

The French steamer Ville de 
Rochefort was wrecked" off Noir- 
moutiers Island on October 14. The 
Ville de Rochefort, bound from Bor- 
deaux, was rammed by the Peveril, 
bound for Bilbao, and sank in three 
minutes. Twenty-three of her crew 
were drowned. 

Senor Roque Senza Pena and Dr. 
Victorino de la Plaza were inaugu 
rated on October 12 respectively as 
President and Vice-President of the 
.Argentine Republic. President Pena 
declared in his message that his in- 
ternational policy would be directed 
with friendship toward Europe and 
fraternity for .\mcrica. 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 




Established 1888. 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

Oldest School on Pacific Coast. Largest 
and best equipped private Nautical School In 
the United States. Graduates prepared for the 
.\merican and British Merchant Marine exam- 
inations. Warrant officers of the United States 
Navy prepared for examination for commis- 
■sion officers. Special course for cadets enter-i 
ing the United States Naval Academy. 

Personal Instruction by Captain Henry Tay- 
lor, M. A., Compass Adjuster, Certified In- 
structor, Passed Master, Proctor in Admiralty, 
Counselor at Law and competent to give legal 
advice on all matters. Including Naturalization. 

WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHOLESALE Sole Agents for RETAIL 

The McCormack System of Fine Tailoring 

McCORMACK BROS. 

Importers, Jobbers and Retailers 

MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, CAPS, BOOTS AND SHOES 
TRUNKS, VALISES AND NOTIONS 

812-814 FIRST AVENUE, Opp. Colman Block SEATTLE, Wash. 



MARSHALUS 
Navigation School 



NEVER HAD A FAILURE 



11 COLMAN DOCK 



SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opp. Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE. WASH. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 
At — 

WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 
220 and 222 First Avenue, South 
Branch Store - - 1335 Third Avenue 

SE.\TTLE, W.\SH. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St., 

Seattle, Wash. 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

Undertakers 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 




SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Candidates for Mas- 
ters' and Mates' Ocean 
or Coast Licenses of 
all Grades are In- 
structed In the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
Navigation In all Its 
Branches, and In the 
Arithmetic of Navi- 
gation in a Clear and Intelligent Manner 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College: 
Ocean Steamship Master, Unlimited- 
Pueet Sound and Alaska Pilot; Author of 
"Self Instructor in Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practice, etc. 

MARITIME BLDG. (Fifth Floor), 
911 Western Avenue. 
Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET, 
Squlre-Latimer Block, Seattle, Waah. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Jose Alonzo and Chas. Domingo, 
marine firemen, and Antoine Silvia 
and Jose Requeiva, oilers, are re- 
quested to leave addresses with E. A. 
Erickson, 1st Patrolman, care of 
Sailors' Union. 

Jack McGrath, late master-at-arms 
on the revenue-cutter McCulloch, is 
inquired for. Address Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

P. J. Bertlesen, winchman; J. Berg, 
V. Erickson, Olaf Kjellman, L. Linde- 
beck, Theadore Yunther and M. C. 
Rasmussen, seamen; F. H. Sullivan, 
steward; W. Kidd, cook; J. Cote and 
Ed. McNellis, firemen, and G. Lina- 
nans, galleyman, on the steam- 
schooner Washington at the time she 
picked up the Minnie E. Kelton. 
Please call on F. R. Wall, 1209 Mer- 
chants' Exchange. 



My work Is my best advertisement. 

W. H. MIDDLETON 
TAILOR 

A. H. ANDERSON, CUTTER 

Custom Tailors' Union Label In every 

Garment. 

519 THIRD AVENUE 

Three Doors South of James, SEATTLE. 



Oscar Pearson 

Express and Baggage 

Stand Outside of Union Office 

Seattle. Wash. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



.Anders Peter Andersen, a native of 
Denmark (Bogo), aged about 42, is 
inquired for by his sister. Address 
.'Vlaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart 
street. 

Wilhelm Mahsing, last heard of as 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is inquired 
for by his brother, John Mahsing, 
now sailing out of New Orleans. Ad- 
dress, Marine Firemen's Union, 514 
Dumaine St., New Orleans, La. 



Seattle, Waah., Utter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflre. letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mail until arrival. 

Albrlgtsen. G. J. Kalnow, A. 

Allen, J. Keenan, Fred 
Anderson, Einor ChrKenny, J. 
Anderson, John -1534Kiesow, P. 

Anderson, Alf. Kronsbrand. H. O. 

Andersen. Andrew Larsen, Claus 

Apps. P. Latz. Konstanz 

Armstrong, W. H. Lewis. Geo. H. 
Bausman, E. -1511 Lindegard, J. 

I Benson, F. -1765 Lundberg, C. 
Berg, Edmund -1312Lunder, Bjorn 

Berge. Johan Lundgren, C. J. 

Berenken, A. Lui, Theo. 

Bianca, F. -1661 Mattson, E. M. 

Botherel, A. Martin, Chr. 

Bryning, Walter McAdam. J. 

Brown. L Miller. James 

Carson, Harold Mikkelson, M. -1584 

Carlson, G. -622 Morgan, Ed. 

Chrlstensen, Peter Moore. J. M. 
Christoffersen, Her-Monson, Andrew 

^ '°f . ^ Nielsen, N. A. -909 

Chrlstensen, Otto Nielsen, Martin 

^-Iri^ Nielsen, M. A. 

Davidson, Jacob Nobereit, Gustaf 

Doll, Herman Nord, G. E. C. 

Dxeycr, Herman Olsen. Oscar, -1062 

Klfstrom, A. Olsen, S. 

Erikson, Allan Olsen, Gabriel 

Eskola, Henry Olsen, Valdlmar 

Fernandoez, A. Olsen, B. -597 

Franzeil, A. Olsson. John H. 

Frivald, John Olsen, Hans 

Fredrickson, B. Omundson, Harry . 

Frose, Ellas Paterson. Robert 

German, R. B. Pedersen, Olaf 

Grandai, Harry Pederson, A. -1173 

Gronburg, Theodor Peterson, A. -1223 

Gustav, John Petterson, C. W. 

Hansen. John P. Penningrud, Ludon 

Haakonsen. H. Porje, Anton 

Hass, Wilhelm Randle. Dave 

Hansen, Hans Chr. Ruzner, Ernest 

Hansen, Andrew Rickardson, Adam 

Harjes, H. -1940 Rimmer. J. 

Ha tness, M. Schmidt. Alfred 

IJellisen, H. Selander, John 

Henrlksen, Adolf Shane J 

Hernonen, H. Shallow, J. 

Hillig. Alb. Smith, Max 

Ho mes, Paddy Speller, Harry 

Holmes. Gus Svensson. A. -1691 

Jensen, Hans Swenson, L. G. 
Johansen, C. M.-1593Tallopon, A. -721 

Johansen, Olaf K. Williamson, A. 

Johnson, Bernard Zagan, J. 

Johnson, Chall Zeisler A 

Johnsen. C. J. Zlma. W. 
Jorgenson, J. 



e.OKt!<K.A, s^AL,. 



The Pride O'Humboldt 

Steam, Lager and Bottled Beer 

BREWED BY 

HUMBOLDT BREWING CO., 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Promptly delivered and shipped to 
any part of the city, county and 
anywhere ALONG THE COAST. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, 
etc. Sole agents for Jackson's Napa 
Soda. Also bottlers and dealers in Enter- 
prise Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



HERMAN SCHULZE, 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

Cigars at Wholesale and Retail. 

439 SECOND STREET, COR. F. 

EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor. 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates. 

Front Street, between C and D, 

EUREKA, CAL. 



FOR A 

GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
OR A SQUARE MEAL 

TRY 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SMOKE 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princes*" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

532 Second Street, • Eureka, Cal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



BURNETT 


BROS. 


JEWELERS AND 

CHRONOMETER 

MAKERS. 

Union Made 


WATCHES AND 
Cor. of HERON 

ABERDEEN. 


JEWELRY 

«, Q STS. 

WASH. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Gents' Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, 
Groceries and Notions. 
We sell everything, and sell at right 
prices. Union-made Goods Specialty. 

You know the place. 
320 S. F St., near Sailors' Union Hall, 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service. 

Phone 691. Stand, 415 E. Heron St. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 

STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS. 

A. M. BENDETSON, 
321 E. Heron St., Aberdeen. 
Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front." 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



TACOMA, WASH. 



DICKSON BROS. CO. 

(U. 8. STORE) 

GENERAL OUTFITTERS FOR MEN AND BOYS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oiliklns, 

Blankets and Quilts, Trunks, Bags, Pipes and Tobaccos, 

Cutlery and Notions. 

Store Close* at 6 p. m.; Saturdays at 10 p. m. 

UNION STORE, UNION GOODS CARRIED, AND ONLY UNION SALESMEN 

EMPLOYED. 
1120-1122 PACIFIC AVENUE TACOMA, WASH. 



THE RED FRONT 
Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS, Etc. 

UNION LABEL GOODS. 

PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively In Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

WATER ST., PORT TOWNSEND, 

Next door to Waterman & Katz, just 

around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
LIVE STOCK, FRESH MEATS 

AND VEGETABLES 

Shipping Supplied at Lowest Rates. 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. B. Coon, Pres. 

OORT TOWNSEND MERCANTILE CO. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED. 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: Bartlett Wharf, 

Port Townsend, Wash. 



WATERMAN & KATZ 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

Complete stock of Ship Chandlery, 
Groceries, Dry Goods, Seamen's Sup- 
plies and Outfits, etc., etc. Honest 
and fair dealing Is our motto. 



MAX GERSON 

Dealer In 
Dry Goods, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, 
Hats and Caps, Gents' Furnish- 
ings and Sailors' Outfits. 
315 Water St., next to Commercial Bank 
PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 



McCORMACK BROS. 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION CLOTHING STORE IN TACOMA. 

NEW STORE— NEW GOODS 

All our Clothing, Hats, Caps, Shirts and Collars have the Union Label. Store 

closes at 6 p. m., except Saturdays. 

COR. FIFTEENTH ST. AND PACIFIC AVE. TACOMA, WASH. 

812 FIRST AVENUE SEATTLE, WASH. 



OLD TOWN, TACOMA, WASH. 

H. I. MALLEK 

2320 NORTH 30th STREET 

Men's Outfitters, Hats, Caps, Shoes, Rubber Boots, Oilskins, Flannel Shirts, 
Quilts, Blankets, and Notions. 

"Boss of the Road" and "Can't Bust 'Em" Overalls, 7Bc; Hickory Shirts, BOc. 
Everything Union made. 

I will give you a square deal, as I want your trade. 

Remember the place, one block north of Union Hall, 2320 N. 30th St., Old Town. 



C. J. SWANSON 

Clothier and Furnisher for 
Gentlemen 

Up-to-date Suits Made to Order 

Hats, Caps, Shoes, Oilskins and 

Rubberboots 

Bedding, Blankets and Pillows 

Uniform gold braids and gold wreaths 
of all descriptions 

119 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and Washington 

SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA 

Phone Douglas 1082 

Home Phone C-348* 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WORKINGMEN'S STORE 

Importer and Dealer In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY-MADE 

CLOTHING 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, etc. 
ROSENSTEIN BROS. 
23 N. Third Street, near Burnslde 

Portland, Oregon. 

WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441 
Residence Phone Tabor 3 
I give you a Claim Check for your bag- 
gage at home. Give me your work 
or we both lose money. 
Office: 
23 UNION AVENUE - - Portland, Ore. 



WHEN IN PORT AT TACOMA 

Visit 

THE SCANDINAVIAN STORE 

717 Pacific Ave. Near City Hall 

B. OLSON, Proprietor. 

Where the Best 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods, Hats, 

Shoes. Rubber Boots and Oilskins can 

be had at reasonable prices. 

Union Goods a Specialty. 



CIHfiBusrtH 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 





WOOD'S THREE TWINS 
$ 1 5, $20, $25 

Three lines of MEN'S SUITS 
at three popular prices that 
have satisfied thousands of 
men in this city in the past 
few years. 

UNION MADE 

y.WOOD&GO. 

MARKET AND FOURTH STS. 
"Where QUALITY costs LITTLE" 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Fritz Schmalkuche, who in March 
last was employed on board the Amer- 
ican schooner Endeavor, bound for 
San Pedro, is inquired for by the 
German Consul, 201 Sansomc street, 
San Francisco. 

Harry Hayes, last heard from in 
Tacoma, Wash., in 1895, or anyone 
having information concerning him i.* 
requested to furnish same to H. W. 
Hutton, 527-529 Pacific Bldg., San 
Francisco. 



John Ferdinand Petterson Franken, 
a native of Finland, is inquired for. 
Address Coast Seamen's Journal. 

Robert Fordyce Bowers, last heard 
of at San Francisco, in March, 1907, 
is requested to communicate with his 
mother Mrs. M. E. Watson, of 12 
Lampton street, Bishopswearmouth, 
Sunderland, England. 

Joseph Flinn, last seen in Los An- 
geles and San Francisco, Cal., is in- 
quired for by his sister, Marie, and 
brother-in-law, John O. Breien, of 
Liverpool, England. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify John 
O. Breien, 4 Conti St., Mobile, Ala. 

Carl Leopold Anderson, native of 
Nordtelje, Sweden, last heard from in 
New Orleans, La., November, 1904, is 
inquired for by his brother John An- 
derson. Address: Sailors' Union, San 
Francisco, Cal. 

John Johnson, a native of Norway, 
born September IS, 1858, at Blege- 
leidet Bamle; last heard from in 1904 
living at 230 Third street, San Fran- 
cisco. Any one able to give any in- 
formation kindly communicate with 
his nephew, M. Olsen, Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Anyone who was on the schooner 
Irwin, at Roche Harbor, when Fred 
Heirkin was injuretl, will please cor- 
respond witli W. J. Lewis, Box 235, 
fort Townsend, Wash. The testi- 
mony of witnesses is urgently re- 
(juired in order to secure any redress 
for the injured man. 




United States Senator Dolliver, of 
Iowa, died suddenly at his home in 
Fort Dodge, la., on October IS. 

Four persons were killed and many 
injured during the recent Vanderbilt 
Cup automobile races in New York. 

The Census officials announce that 
frauds have been discovered in the 
returns from certain cities t)f the Pa- 
cific Coast. 

The British Government has finally 
agreed to give Canada full control 
over foreign copyright regulations in 
the Dominion. 

Claude Grahame White, an English 
aviator, will attempt to fly from 
Washington to Baltimore and return 
and to break the record for sustained 
flight. 

Fifty-five Republicans and twenty- 
three Democrats, now members of the 
Sixty-first Congress, will go out of of- 
fice on March 4, having retired or 
failed of renomination. 

Walter Wellman, on October 15, 
began his attempt to cross the Atlan- 
tic in the dirigible balloon America, 
starting from New York. He was re- 
ported by wireless making fifteen 
miles an hour. 

The entire Fifth avenue (New 
York) establishment of the five Du- 
veen brothers was seized by Federal 
officers on October 13, charged with 
conspiracy to defraud the Govern- 
ment out of Customs dues. 

William R. Hearst has offered a 
purse of $50,000 for an airship flight 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The 
flight may be made by any person and 
any route which includes Chicago, 
and must be completed in thirty days. 

The appeal of Frederick A. Hyde 
of San Francisco and Joost Schneider 
of Tucson, Ariz., from conviction and 
sentence in western land fraud cases, 
was dismissed by the Court of Ap- 
peals of the District of Columbia on 
October 11. 

Important reforms in the adminis- 
tration of criminal justice in this 
country were recommended in a re- 
port presented to the American In- 
stitute of Criminal Law and Crimin- 
ology, holding its second annual con- 
fereuLC in Washington. 

The United States, the greatest cot- 
ton producing country of the world, 
imported in the fiscal year 1909 86,- 
037,691 pounds of raw cotton, valued 
atl $15,816,138, tlic second largest 
year's importation of cotton in the 
history of the country. 

A comprehensive plan for an entire 
reorganization and reassignment of 
the Federal military forces, is to be 
submitted to Congress in December. 
Among the proposed features is an in- 
crease of twenty-four regiments of in- 
fantry and seven regiments of field 
artillery. 

Miss Rose M. Myears has been ap- 
pointed by the San Francisco Board 
of Health as factory inspector, at a 
salary of $115 a month. Miss Myears 
is a member of the Bindery Women's 
Union, whom she represents in the 
Labor Council, and is a member of 
the executive board of tlie Council. 

Ai)plication was made by the Grand 
Trunk Pacific Railway on October 11 
to the British Columbia Government 
for permission to employ Chinese on 
the railroad. The request was not 
granted. Forty Chinese who came 
from Hongkong on the last two 
steamers, alleging themselves to be 
merchants, were ordered deported. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The union pressmen on the Denver 
morning papers struck on October IS. 
The papers are being issued in re- 
duced size on old-style presses. 

The Hazle Brook Colliery of J. S. 
Wentz & Co., employing about 500 
hands, resumed operations on Oc- 
tober 10, after being in idleness since 
July for repairs. 

In the New South Wales (.Aus- 
tralia) Industrial Court recently, 
Judge Heydon fined the Newcastle 
Municipal Council £3, with £7 costs, 
for a breach of the painters' award. 

South Australia's Labor Govern- 
emnt, in order to encourage native in- 
dustry, has decided that wherever it 
is possible it will procure materials 
from within the Commonwealth. 

Machinists of the Baltimore and 
Ohio and Baltimore and Ohio South- 
western railroads who went on strike 
about a year ago will be reinstated. 
No announcement of the terms of set- 
tlement was made. 

Last year in Queensland, according 
to Government Statistician Weedon, 
32,158 males and 1301 females were 
engaged in farming, while 11,529 
males and 11,419 females were en- 
gaged in dairying. These figures 
show the labor employed only. 

The members of the Neath Miners' 
Lodge at Maitland (N. S. W.), having 
considered the advisability of a gen- 
eral downing of tools until their 
leaders are released from jail, their 
proposition to do so was ruled out of 
order by the Miners' delegate board. 

Two hundred employes of the West 
Albion Slate Company at Pen Argyl. 
Pa., went on a strike on October 4. 
The strikers say a cut of 20 cents a 
square, meaning a reduction of as 
much as 50 cents a day in the wagc.= 
of some of the men, has taken place. 

Five hundred persons, including 
strikers, strike breakers, spectators 
and policemen, engaged in a riot on 
Halsted street, Chicago, on October 
IS. Nine strikers were arrested after 
being severely clubbed. Five police 
were bruised. The riot came as a de 
velopment of the strike of tailors. 

The president of the Prussian Gov- 
ernment district of Frankfurt has 
fixed the wages of ordinary day la- 
borers in the city of Frankfurt and 
suburbs as follows: Male adults, 72.3 
cents; female adults, 60 cents; youth- 
ful males, 48 cents; youthful fe- 
males, 33.3 cents. 

Miners, who made a demonstration 
at Remscheid, Prussia, on October 11, 
against the blacklist issued by the 
employment agencies, attacked the 
police with stones when the officers 
attempted to disperse them. The po- 
lice charged the crowd repeatedly, 
using their sabers freely. 

The award of the Southern Col- 
lieries' Wages Board in New South 
Wales is regarded by the miners' 
representatives with satisfaction. 
Preference to unionists has been 
granted, and the award is to be cur- 
rent for three years. Eight hours 
bank-to-bank is fixed, e.xcept in one 
mine. 

The Victorian (Australia) branch 
of the United Furniture Trades So- 
ciety has under consideration the ad- 
visability of asking the Federal Gov- 
ernment to grant a bonus on Euro- 
pean-made furniture, on the ground 
that the whole of the Governments, 
both Federal and State, are powerless 
to enforce the law against the Chi- 
nese, and compel them to pay the 
same rates as the Europeans. 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail Is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
P. Scharrenberg, Headquarters Sailors' 
Union, San Francisco, to forward same 
to the port of their destination. 



Aalesund, Carl O. 
Abraliamsen, Aslak 
Abraliamsen, -1263 
Adamsson, John 
Adamson. O. 
Ahrens, Walter 
Akselsen, Aksel 
Albertson, Hans Chr, 
Alton. Nestor 
Amundsen, Daniel 
Andersen, -1233 
Andresen, -1635 
Andersen, Carl Emil 
Andersen, J. O. 
Andersen, -1620 
Andersen, Ned. 
Andersen, Kdvin 
Bach, E. E. 
Baker, C. W. 
Barney, Chas. 
Beck, John A. 
Behrens, Otto 
Beling, Oscar 
Bende, Adolf 
Benson, -17G5 
Benson. Jolin E. 
Berg, Edmund 
Berg, H. J. 
Berg. Julius 
Bergstrom. Axel 
Beyerle, Rupert 
Billing, Kiiut 
Birdie, W. G. 
Carlson, Julius 
Carl-son, Richard 
Cassen, Harry 
Ceclan, John 
Chaler, B. 
Chandler, P. L. 
Cliristensen, J. J. 
Christensen, M. H. 
ChristofCersen, B. 
Dahlbeck, John 
Dahlstrom. -749 
Dangul, A. 
Danielsen, Hans H. 
Danielsen, Johan 
Daumgold, Ernest 
Day, Harry E. 
De Agnello, P. 
Eckert, Fred 
Egcnas, Nels 
Eklund, August 
Eklund, David 
Ekstrom, Geo. 
Eliasen, J. A. 
Eliassen, Sigurd 
Ellingsen, Edward 
Blonen. M. H. 

Fagerholm, Carl 
Faulkner, John E. 
Feli.\, Hans 
Fischer. Peter 
Foley, J. J. 
Foyn. Sam 
Frank, Bernard 
Frankovic, A. 
German, R. B. 
Gerner, Hans 
Gibbs, Harry 
Gilbersen, Andrew 
Godorog, Vasale 
Gonzalez, J. 
Graugaard, L. 
Gravier, Eugene 
Green, William 
Gronman, -456 

Haering, Walter 
Hagen, Carl L. 
Halversen, Wm. 
Halvorsen, Anton 
Halvorsen. Severin 
Hanimerstein, Oscar 
Hannus, A. 
Hansen, H. O. 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, -2085 
Hansen, Adolph 
Hansen, -2060 
Hansen, Emanuel 
Hansen, Henry E. 
Hansen, H. P. 
Harlow, H. A. 
Haug, Hans H. 
Hedinskoy, J. 
Hedvall, A. 
Hengst, Otto 
Isaksen, Gunnar 

Jacobsen, Edward 
Jacobsen, Joakim 
Jamieson, J. E. 
Jansson, Chas. A. 
Jansson, K. -1234 
Jensen, -1.S78 
Jensen, -1614 
Jensen, -1944 
Jensen, -2043 
Jensen, -2014 
Jensen, Adolf 
Jensen, Geo. L. 
Jensen, Oscar 
Jensen, M. C. 
Jensen, N. O. 
.lensen, Olof Nils 
Jensen, -1987 
Johansen, Axel 
Johansen, -1991 

Kaasik, A. 
Kalias, Aug. 
Karlspn, John A. 
Karlsen. Conrad 
Kaiisson, Josef 
Karlsson, R. 
Karlsson, Gus. Robt. 
Karlsson, Gust. 
Kaus. L. 
Kayser, Chas. 
Kerlcan, Alex 
Klesel. A. C. 
Kinerman, Chas. 

I.,ackey. C. H. 
Laine, W. E. 
Lankvist, John 
Larsen, -1008 
Larsen, -1.536 
Larsen, Laurlls P. 



Andersen, Toni 
Anderson, Sven 
Andersson, Karl 
Andersson, Aug. 
Andersson, Karl 
Andreasen, Hans 
Andreasen, Mogens 
Antell, Fred 
Antonsen, Karl 
Anzine, Giuseppe 
Arenius, Geo. 
Arnstrom, Julius 
Asp. Gustaf 
Asplund, August 
Arnold, E. B. 
Aubaum, A. 
Aylward, James 
Bjorklund, Erik 
Blair, Francis 
Boers, M. 
Boisen, Jorgen 
Bonner, Walter 
Boquist, Chas. 
Bove, -1741 
Brams, C. S. 
Bregler, Fred. 
Broden, Julius 
Brox, Henrik 
Bruce, Otto 
Bruun, Axel 
Brunwald, H. 
Buaas, Thomas 
Burr, E. C. 
ChristolTerson, Alf." 
Clark, James 
Clauson, C. 
Cleissman. Frank 
Conrad, Fritz 
Cooley, Howard 
Creal}', Tom A. 
Cutler, Wm. 

De Haan, G. A. 
Doense, J. 
Doherty, Bob 
Dracar, Edgardo 
Dreger. Jack 
Dreyfcldt. Alb. 
Dryger. Max 
Duff, Wm. 
Engblom, John R. 
Engebretsen, -125 
Eriksen, Edw. 
Eriksen, Gerhard 
Eriksen, Karl H. 
Ericksson, Chas. 
Evans. E. 
Evanger, Nils 

Fransson, Frank G. 
Fredriksen, B. D. 
French, J. A. 
Fiedler. K. E. 
Frivald, John 
Fuchs, Jos. 
Furesson, Theo. 

Grossl, -766 
Grunbel, Gustav 
Guerrero, Mrs. 
Gundersen. -7S5 
Gunn, W. D. 
Gustafson, Frank 
Gustafson, G. 
Gustafson, G. B. 
Gustafson, Ivar 
Gustafson, Oscar 

Hansen, O. 
Hansen, Theodor 
Hansen, -182. 
Hollwig, Franz 
Henning, August 
Hermansen, L. 
Hermansen, -1622 
Hemes, Lars -2042 
Heyne, Herman 
Hcyne, H. 
Hillelam, A. 
Hingren, J. 
Hinke, E. 
Hofgaard, Hans 
Hogstedt. Charlie 
Hogstrom. Axei 
Holm, Jolian 
Holstein, R. 
Hopstad, -2101 
Hunt, Gus 



Johannsen, Peter 
Johansen, Alex 
Johansen, Mathias 
Johansen, John M. 
Johannesen, Arthur 
.Tohansson, -1965 
Johansson, -1204 
Johansson, Carl 
Johansson, .Tohn 
Johansson, E. R. 
Johansson. J. H. 
Johnson, Oscar 
.Tohnsson, Roy W. 
Johnsson, J. R. 
Jolinston, J. A. 
Johnson. C. R. 
Johndahl. H. 
Jones, R. 
Jordt, -1737 

Kjellgren, L. A. 
Knieling. John 
Knopf, Louis 
KnuUsen. Martin 
Kolter, L. 
Kopperstad. B. 
Kristoffersen. Alf. 
Krlstophersen. Jacob 
Krogstad, H. E. 
Kruger. H. 
Kuhlman. Louis 
Kuhne, Karl 
Kukuhskin, M. 

Larsen, Martin 
Larsen, Soren 
Larson, Lars M. 
Lauritsen, Hans 
Lehto. Emil 
Le Mai re 



Leroen, I-ars 
Lersten, J. O. 
LiglitliofC, Cli. 
Lincoln, Harold 
l.indgren, Gustaf 
Lindberg, Ole 
Lindskog, Thor. O. 
Madsen, Th. 
Malniberg, Elis 
Mamers. Chas. 
MansPield, Jack 
Martens, Hans 
Martin, H. 
Masterman, E. 
Mathisen, Herman 
Matre. Nels J. 
Matson, -1471 
Matthews, F. 
Matteson, J. A. 
Mattson, John M. 
McAvay, J. A. 
McLouglin, M. 
Nanjack, G. 
Nelson, Chas. M. 
Nelson, F. 
Nelson, Martin 
Nelson, John 
Nerbrugge, D. 
Newman, J. 
Nick. Peter 
Nielsen, N. C. 
Odland, B. B. 
Ohls. Johan 
Oistad, Hans 
Olafson, M. 
Ohinder, Karl 
(JImann, P. 
Olsen, -1112 
Oisen, Ole. Chr. 
Oisen, Jens 
Olsen, Chas. 
Olson, -995 
Olsen, Hans J. 
Olsen, -533 
Palmroth, J. 
Paulson, A. 
Pearson, W. H. 
I'earson, Bernard 
Pearsson, John L. 
Pedersen, Karl 
Pedersen, Johan 
Pedersen, Julius 
Pedersen, Henning 
I'emberton, Dave 
Petersen, H. C. 
Petersen, Carl 
Ramberg, Barney 
Ranak, Louis 
Rasmussen, Emil 
Kavall, J. E. 
Keay, Steve 
Reiner, Karl 
Reinliold, Ernst 
Rintzo, John 
Saarin, John 
Salvesen. Fred 
Snnisig, Carl 
.Sander, -1068 
Sanne, Rudolf 
Sandstrom, Ivar 
Sandstrom, O. H. 
Saul, Th. A. 
Schagcr, E. L. 
Sclienberg, C. 
Sciimelil, Jas. P. 
S<-hlachte, Alfred 
Schevig, A. B. 
Schmalkuche, Fritz 
Schmidt, Hans 
Scholtens. Ben 
Schott, H. 
Scliultman, J. H. 
Schultman. Johan 
.Schulz, Ernst 
.Srhelenz, Hani 
.Sclmell. Henry 
Scliultz. Albert 
Sriander. Gus. 
Scott. E. G. 
Seagreen, John 
Seberg, C. 
Srhellenberg. H. 
Seiger, Joe 
Selander. Gus. 
Sharp, Fred 
Siem. C. 
Sinyard, W. 

Taj'lor, Wm. H. 
Teigland. Carl 
Tergesen, Tom 
Terwedow. Richard 
Thilo. Peder 
Thompson. Ch. 
Thomassen, Paul 
Thorsen, Otto E. 
Tluireson, Arthur 

Vana, Olaf O. 
Vejvado, Frank 
Verbruzze, L. 
Vesta, Tom 
Vick, J. M. 
Wahlberg, Rudolph 
Wakroom, J. 
Wannkvist, E. 
Ward. H. 
Welsen, J. 
Welure, -1064 
Wenneck, A. 
Werner, Paul 
Westman, A. 
Wever, Carl 
Zagen, Geo. 
Zcisig, Johannes 



Louis. Martin 
Luokmann, E. 
lAiden, E. 
Lunde, Ole 
Lundgren, Hugo 
Lynch, -1586 

McBratney, Hugh 
Menz, Paul E. 
Merken, Christ 
Meyer, Raymond 
Mikkelsen, Axel 
Milas, Peter 
Miller, J. B. 
Mitchel. Alex 
Moe, John M. 
Moren, E. H. 
Morken, J. L. 
Morrison. Donald 
Morse, E. G. 
Mullen. Joseph 
Murphy, -1916 
Nielsen, -909 
Nielsen, H. J. 
Nielsen, -1037 
Niit. P. 

Nilson, Edward 
Nord, G. E. 
Nordling, Sven 
Nylund, Hans J. 

Olsen, Nils 
Olsen. Olaf D. 
Olsen, Otto 
Olsen, Paulus 
Olsen, Olaf S. 
Olsen, W. 
Olsson. Ernest 
Osse, H. 

Oterbeck, Hans H. 
Ottenhausen, Carl 
Ouchterlony, Fred 
Owen, Fred 

Peter.son. Frank V. 
Petrow, F. 
Petterson, Chas. 
Petterson, -1062 
Petterson. John B. 
Pierson. .Vndrew 
Plaskette, Mike 
Plottner. Alfred 
Post. Albert 
Prendel, L. 
Prenfs. F. 
Prescott, Richard 
Robeck, E. 
Robinet, Geo. 
Rosenwald. Isak 
Ross, Rudolf 
Ross, Wm. 
Rudberg. Chas. 
Runak, Hans 
Russell, Wm. 
.Sjoberg, Johan 
Skjellerup, A. 
Skotheim. Sigurd 
Smith, Henry 
Smith, Jos. P. 
Soderlund. Anton 
Soetveit. G. 
Soderling, Axel 
Sonne, A. J. -2213 
Sorensen, -1664 
Sorensen, -1492 
Soto, Santos 
Stange, Anton 
Stangeland, P. E. 
Sterro, J. E. 
Stein, John 
Stewart, J. L. 
Stolzer. Aug. 
Stolt. A. J. 
Strand, Charley 
Strand, Olaf 
Stenfoes. G. 
Strom. C. 
Sunde Albert 
Sund. Alex 
Suominen, O. 
Svendsen, C. J. 
Svenson, Algot 
Sweeney, John 
Swenson, Edwin 
Swanson, Ims. 
Swanson, Martin 
Swanson, -2184 

Tonning, Christ 
Toroik, Olaf 
Torbjornsen, O. 
Torkild.sen, Marins 
Tornquist, S. 
Tramm, Hans 
Trentani, Louis 
Tscheekar, F. 
Tuft, Edw. 

Vister. Julius 
Von Vlies, P. 
Von Fyren, G. P. 
Vucic, V. 

M'eyer. Paul 
Whalstedt. Alb. 
Wiad. H. I. 
Wiborg, John 
Wikstrom, Wm. 
Wiilpnnen, Edw. 
Winkel. August 
Wisto, Julius 
.Witol, H. 
Wolens, J. 
Zimmerling, F. 



Peterson, Henning 
Rignell, Eric 
Russell, W. 
Sansing, Carl 
Stensland, Paul 



Strand, -1786 
Swanson, Martin, 

-21S4 
Torpersen, Kaspar 
Wlnblad, M. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Andreasen, O. L. 
Aken, Emil 
Asker, John 
Andersen, Oluf 
Andersen, J. -934 
Andersen, Sam 
Adman, O. 
Buth, Siegfried 
Brander, Wm. 
Boy, George 
Brandt, Nils 
Bensen, John 
Collins, F. 
Cooley, Howard 
Castel, J. 
Calson, Carl 
Comstock, Howard 
Cuttler, Wm. 
Davis, John 
Dirks, George 
De Cantes, M. 
Fisko. Oluf 
Faccet, Sam 
Gras, Charles 
Graves, Sam 
Granberg, Gus S. 
Hubner, H. 
Hall, Leonard 
Holnistrom, C A. 
Holm, Carl 
Hartman, Geo. 
Hansen, Ole 
Hanson, Henry 
Houser, Charlie 
Johnson, Andrew 
Jacobsen, G. -1092 
Isacson, Ch., -140 
Johanson, Hjalmar 
Jarf, Kristian 
Jorgensen, Charles 
Johnson, C. -1345 
Jensen, Ingvalt, M. 
Johannessen, Josef 
Joiianson, Fr. -2019 
Johanson, Teodor 
Jolmson, R. W. 
Johnson, Carl, -1585 
Johnson, Julius 
Joliansen, Herluf C. 
Jonasson Carl Axel 
Johnson, Frank 
Kose, Armin 
Karlson, Edvard 
Krumbiegel, Arthur 
Kuhme, Wm. 
Kimeral, Herman 
Klelman. Joe 
Koffer, Mark 
Kiolen, K.arl 
Lundberg, C. 
Lindbloin, Ernst 
I^arsen, George 



Lindholm, Chas. 
Lingberg, Oscar 
Larson. M. A. 
Lohtonen, Jolin 
Lengwems, U. L. 
Lorentzen. Ernest 
Linquist, Gust 
Lorin, Martin 
Lind. Gust 
Miller. Otto 
Mattson, Karl 
Mattson, J. 
Neilson, A. O. 
Nurmi, Victor 
Nilson, Alfred 
Olsen, Ernest 
Olsen, E. A. 
Olsen, Carl 
Olsson, Carl G. -1101 
Olsen. Oswald. -1069 
Oscar, Carl 
Orten, Sigurd 
Olson, Wilhelm 
Olsen, John 
Olsen, Valler 
Olsen, Olaf O. 
Pedersen, Kristian 
Petersen, Oscar 
Poison, C. -641 
Pearson, Julius F. 
Pettersen, Wilhelm 
Pedersen, Hans Chr. 
Petersen, Oscar Fr. 
Petersen, A. G. -2404 
Prondberg, G. -130G 
Peratis, John 
Roswell, Gus. 
Rost. K. G. 
Rasmussen, N. G., 

-485 
Swanson. Martin 
Skoman, Chas. 
Sverstrup, E. F. 
Sparre, Don 
Schulter. Paul 
Schelenz, Karl 
Steversen. Charles 
Stevens, Scott R. 
Sorensen, Karl 
Svenson, Bernard 
Siegurd, Jushus T. 
Smith, J. V. 
Speckman, Max 
Thompson, Chas. 
Thorsen. Jens 
Tolby, Harold 
Wishaar, E. B. 
Westnas, Ivar 
Wuorlo, J. 
Veaal. G. 
Winters, C. 



Eureka, CaL, Letter List. 



Andersen, John 

Anderson, Olof 

Anderson, S. 

Armmi, Walter 

Blunt. H. 

Bostrom, C. 

Brown, C. L. 

Bryan, G. F. 

Christensen, Harvy 

Conaughton, H. 

Ekwall, G. A. 

Fors. Alfred 

Kraberg. Enock 

Goevyette, Joseph 

Grant, John 

Gunther, Theo. 

Gustafson, Edvard 

Horlln. Ernest 

Hoilins. Frank 

I-saacson. Gustav 

Ivar.s, Carl 

Johanesen, Arthur 

Johnsen. J., -25 

Johnston, R. 

Karlson, Anders E. 
I Klauson, Axel. 
I Lombar, Ermlno 
I Lorensen, Org. C. 

Mlchaelsen, Jolianes 



Micheli Agojtino 
Niccolal, Sant 
Nilsen, R. 
Nilson, O. 
Nordblom, Ben. 
Nylund. Sven 
Olsen, Peder A. 
Olson, Bror. 
Olson, C. 
Oman. Victor 
Palomo, G. 
Pedersen. Martin 
Pedersen, Paul 
Pedersen, Peter 
Petterson, Aaskar 
Penney. Math. 
Salminen. K. W. 
Selander. Gustaf 
Shulls. Christ. 
Sjellman, Jonas 
Stlenen, J. C. 
Svendsen, Olof 
Teigland, G. 
Thoresen, Petter 
Kalkman, Otto 
Walbreth, Carl 
Wilsonn, John 
•Tannie. C. 
Yulmky, Wm. 



Pt. Townsend Letter List. 



Bianea, F. 
1 Carsson. -1044 
, Carlsen, H. G. 

Harmening. Fritz 
I Johnsen, Emil 



Licsmann, Fred 
Rosbeck. Gustav 
Schmidt, A., -938 
Simensen, Simon 
Tramm, Hans 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 

of the Pacific. 

Andersen, -1609 

Andreasen, Hans 

Arrhenins, Geo. 

Behrentz, C. 

Carlson. Carl T. 

Christensen, Chris- 
ten D. 

Damiano, Alex. 

I>yrness. L. E. 

Eckert. W. F. 

Gustafson, K. O. 

Hardmere. C. -1245 

Hengst, Otto 

Jensen. -2014 

Joliansen, Axel -20 



Jordfald, Theo. 
Kaald, John 
I.ackey, C. 
Larson, G. A. 
Lewis, H. 
Pihpick, K. 
Lundman, Carl 
Martin. H. 

Martens. Hans -1882 
Matisen. Nils 
Olsen. G. 
Pedersen, Chas. 
Pedersen, Karl 
IPetersen, N. -782 



i Anderson, Alfred J. 
! Bowers, Gust. 
: Collins, E. F. 

Davey, Chas. 

Eishel, Erich, -740 

Fors, Alfred 
' Hansen, Chas. 
' Haug. Hans H. 

Kimeral. Herman 

I..ewis, J. W. 

Lowe. John A. 

Moorten, Louis 

Nelson, Fred 



Nelson. Nels B. 
Ness, John 
Ol.sen. Chas. 
Petterson, Knut L. 
Pettersen, Johan 
Reay, L. A. 
Reuter, Ernest 
Robsham, Jens W. 
Lolberg, B. P. 
Thore. B. E. 
LTllman. Gustaf 
Vongehr, Edward 
Zelig, Gustav 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Antonsen, Fred 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, P. Risor 
Belzen, Ivan 
Backman. Ernest 
Brown, Chas. R. 
Bjomsgaard, Kristen 
Carnie, Robert 
Conwell, James 



Ekblom, Alfred 
Goodman, Carroll 
Steen, Hilmar 
Scott, Wm. 
Schaab. Anton 
Stephan. M. 
Tyler, Wm. B. 
Winters, Fred 
Whittol, J. 



THE HARBOR HOTEL 

Formerly "The Mohawk" 

132 EAST STREET 

Opposite Ferry 

STEAM HEAT. HOT AND COLD 

WATER IN EVERY ROOM 



Elevator Service Free Baths 
and a Large Reading Room 

Rates: 
$2.00 PER WEEK AND UP 
35c PER DAY AND UP 

T. L. SELCHAU P. N. NANSEN 
Proprietors 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and iVlarl<et Sts. 

Phone Dougias 315 San Francitco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings (THE GERMAN BANK) Conmerclai 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks 
uf San Francisco.) 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cat. 

Guaranteed Capital .... $ 1,200,000.00 
Capital actually paid up in cash $ 1,000,000.00 
Reserve and Contfngent Funds ■■» 1.555.093.0.5 

Deposits June 30th, 1910 40,384,727.21 

Total Assets 43,108,907.82 

Remittance may be made by draft, post office, or Wtlls 
Fareo & Oo's money orders, or coin by expres-s^ 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock .\. M. to 3 o'clock P. M., except 
Svturdiys to 12 o'clock M. and Saturday Evenings from 
6.3) o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. for receipt of deposits 

""officers— President, N. Ohiandt; First Vice-Pres- 
ident, Daniel Meyer; Second Vcc-President and M:mnger, 
George Tournv; Third Vice-President, J. W Van Berg.™; 
Cashier A H R. Schmidt; Assistant Cashier. Wil.iam 
Herrmann; Secretary, A. H. Muller; Assistant Secretaries 
0. J. 0. Folte and Wm. D. Newliouse; Goodlcdow & 
EcUs, G-nerd Attorneys. , .r, . , >. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohiandt, Dimicl Meyer, 
George Tournv, J. W. Van Bergen. Ign. Steinhart, i. V 
Walter, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse and W. S. G'.nd- 
fellow. 

MISSION BRANCH, 257'2 Mission Street, between 21st 
end 22nd Sts. For receipt and payment of Deposits only. 
C W. H-ver, Manager. 
' RICHMOND DISTRICT BR.\NCH. 432 Clement Street, 
b->t\ve'n .5th and 6th Avenues. For receipt and payment 
of deposits only. W. C. Heycr, Manager. 



HOTEL SANTA FE 

684 Folsom street, near Third street 

Over 100, all sunny rooms to let; fur- 
nished up-to-date; electric lights; run- 
ning hot and cold water; baths free. 
Rates, $1.75 to 13.00 per week; 25c to 
75c per day. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
fZ to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water in 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL. LUNDGREN, Manager.- 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, oppo- 
site Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier. 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c per 
night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 month. 
Baths, Reading Room. Office open all 
night. Best place near waterfront. 
Investigate. 



Blue Diamond Havana Cigars are 
satisfactory because they are hand- 
made from imported Havana by com- 
petent union cigar makers — 2 for 25c 
—10c, 3 for 25c. 

THRANE BROS., Makers. 
46 East St., Under Union Headquar- 
ters and 1800 Market St. 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
109 STEUARTST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



THE EAGLE CIGAR STORE 

and Laundry Office 

HENRY BORNEMAN, Proprietor 

Give me a call for old time's sake 

229 EAST STREET 

Between Washington and Jackson Sts. 

San Francisco, Cai. 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 

We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — Ail Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Below Bth, near U. S. Mint and Emporium 

Phones: Kearny 1966; Home J-1966 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Nils Edmund Johansen, a native of 
Tansberg, Norway, aged about 50, last 
heard of at Melbourne, Australia, is 
inquired for by his brother. Address 
Martin Johansen, 839 Centennial ave- 
nue, Alameda, Cal. 

Information is wanted from the 
crews of the barkentine S. N. Castle 
and the schooner John D. Spreckels 
in regard to the seizure of these ves- 
sels in the Okhotsk Sea in 1907 by 
the Russian gunboat Madjur. Kindly 
call on Samuel Pond, First National 
Bank Building, San Francisco. 



CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY 



OF CALIFORNIA 



MARKET AND SANSOME STREETS 

Branches: (24 Van Neaa Avenut and 3039 Sixteenth Street 

Authorized Capital, $3,000,000. Capital Paid In, $1,500,000. 

Accounts of individuals, firms, corporations and societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts at the rate of 4% per annum. 
Drafts and Letter* of Credit Issued, payable in all parts of the world. 
Chat. F. Leege, Pres. W. A. Frederick, Vice-Prea. B. G. TognazzI, Manager. 

Chas. C. Moore, Vice-Pres. 

Gavin McNab, Vice-Pres. 



Domestic and Naval. 



SOMETHING NEW 

THe Antidote Pipe 

A POSITIVE 

NICOTINE 
DESTROYER. 

"ANTIDOTE," 
the Catalytic Pipe, 
has Four Impor- 
tant Advantages 
which can be found 
in No Other Pipe. 

1. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" needs No 
Breaking in. Ev- 
ery smoker knows 
the terrors of the 
first few smokes in 
an ordinary Pipe. 
The First Smoke in 
an "ANTIDOTE" 
is as sweet as 
an ordinary Pipe 
sweetened by Long 
Usage. 

2. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" can not 
burn out. The 
Catalytic lining 
protects the briar. 

3. The "ANTI- 
DOTE" is always 
Dry even with con- 
stant smoking. 

4. Th© "ANTIDOTE" scientifically destroys the Nicotine, making it 
evaporate. A porous lining filled with Coal Tar Particles (Platinum, etc.) is 
placed in the bowl of a briar pipe, this is called the Ca^.alyser; the smoke 
passing over the Catalyser produces Formoi. This Formol turns all the 
moisture and Nicotine into steam, causing it to pass off into the air and 
evaporate. 

All "ANTIDOTE" Pipes are hand made, of the Best French Briar. 

KASSBR BROS. 

Distributors 

19 MARKET STREET, S. E. Cor. Steuart, San Francisco, Cal. 

Pipe Repairing Our Specialty. 




SMOKERS 



See that this label (in light 
blue) appears on the box in 
which you are served. 



Issued by AuUloiil/ of tne Ciga/ MaKers' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

«lhi^ Ctfllif if;J. IIW th« CIjot comamei) inthls box (aw ban made byi FlCt-CHSS WofldUl 
i WMbCR or THE CIGAR MUER3 'INrUHATlolUl. UNION « Aluriu, in argdnizatMi devoteil tg tf« ad- 

vdncemEnl of Ihe MORAl MAT[KW.jnd immiCIUAl WlltAM Of TO CfiATf. 



ThersfoiB we lecanaKBd 



All lAhtn^miflU upon this Label mtf be punis^,«cl accofdTing to law. 
gS^«e SIMILE 



J punisr,«ci dccofoing 10 lam. 

Q. K (/Il4<^ui4. resident, 

' CMfUcl 



^fAmeriea 



Label Shirts 
Label Collars 

Bell Brand Union-Made 
COLLARS in popular 
shapes at two for 25c. 
S H I R TS made right 
here in San Francisco 
by Union Labor. You. 
can patronize home 
industry and Union La- 
bor. Good assortment of 
shirts at $1.00 and $1.50. 

Johnston's 

Men's Furnishing Goods 

916 MARKET STREET 

Directly Opposite 5th 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

BED SEAL CIGAR CO.. MANUrACTUBEBS 

183 HARTFORD %T., %. F. 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 

72 MARKET STREET 

1158 MARKET STREET 

605 KEARNY STREET 

2640 MISSION STREET 

26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



The James N. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Carl Johans Nielsen, native of Nor- 
way, aged 24 years, last heard of in 
1909 at San Francisco, is inquired for 
by S. Thomsen, 709 Cole street, San 
Francisco. 



Rear-Admiral W. S. Cowles, U. S. 
N., retired, brother-in-law of former 
President Roosevelt, was nominated 
on October 12 by the Republicans 
for Representative from Farmington, 
Conn., in the General Assembly of 
that State. 

President Taft on October 13 
finally approved plans for raising the 
wreck of the battleship Maine, which 
call for the completion of the work 
on or before the thirteenth anniver- 
sary of the destruction of the war ves- 
sel, February IS next. 

Commander Robert E. Peary, the 
Arctic explorer, will be promoted to 
the rank of captain in the corps of 
naval civil engineers on October 20 
as the result of the retirement of 
Captain U. S. G. White on account 
of age. 

Tlie turbine steamers Yale and Har- 
vard sailed from New York on Oc- 
tober 17 on the 15,000-mile passage to 
San Francisco by way of the Magel- 
lan Straits. They have been bul- 
warked with heavy planking to keep 
out the seas that they may encounter. 

The presentation of the $10,000 sil- 
ver service, the gift of Delaware, took 
place on October 5 on board the bat- 
tleship of that name. The presenta- 
tion was made by Governor Penne- 
will. Captain Gove accepted the gift 
in behalf of the officers and crew of 
the vessel. 

Major Deakyne, engineer in charge 
of channel improvements at Phila- 
delphia, notified the American Dredg- 
ing Co. on October 5 to start work 
at two of the five sections in the 
Delaware River, which are to be 
dredged to a depth of 35 feet and 
widened to 1000 and 1200 feet. 

In an interview Lee Some, chief 
secretary for Prince Tsai Suun, of 
China, is credited by the Gazette- 
Times of Pittsburg, with the an- 
nouncement that a contract for two 
Chinese battleships, to cost $15,000,- 
000, has been awarded to Charles M. 
Schwab, head of the Bethlehem Steel 
Company. 

The American clipper ship Edward 
Sewall, from Honolulu, spoke the 
British ship Clacmannanshire, from 
lluara Isles for Glasgow, at latitude 
31.47 south, longitude 31 west. The 
Sewall also spoke the Norwegian 
liark Agde, from Lysekil for Buenos 
.\yres, in latitude 8.33 south, longi- 
tude 33.10 west. 

Fears are entertained at Kingston, 
Jamaica, that Cayman Islands have 
been devastated by the storm which 
passed over the West Indies during 
the forty-eight hours ending October 
16. The steamer Prinz Eitel Fred- 
crich, which arrived at Kingston on 
the 16th, reports that for twenty-four 
hours after leaving Havana the wind 
blew at the rate of eighty miles an 
hour. 

The steamship Rotterdam, of the 
Holland-America line, is now on her 
way to New York froin Rotterdam. 
Prior to the Rotterdam's departure 
from Rotterdam Commodore Stenger 
was decorated by the Queen of the 
Netherlands and made a Knight in 
tlie Order of Orange Nassau in reg- 
nition of his abilities as a commander 
in having recently completed his 200th 
trip to this country. In addition he 
was presented with a gold medal by 
the directors of the Holland-America 
line, and with a valuable painting: 
showing the Rotterdam entering the 
Hook of Holland. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Physical Risks. 
The hammock now has lost its charm. 
The bump it gives does little harm. 
If real thrills you seek to gain, 
You tumble from an aeroplane. 

— Washington Star. 



Locating Them. — Hank Stubbs — 
Abe Crockett started up his cider mill 
last week. 

Bige Miller — I wondered where all 
the grocery store crowd wuz lately. — 
Boston Herald. 



Regrets. — Mrs. Guzzler — Aren't you 
ashamed to come home in this condi- 
tion? 

Mr. Guzzler — Mortified to death, 
my dear. 1 find that my capacity 
isn't what it used to be. — Philadelphia 
Record. 



Eventually. — Reporter — You say. 
Miss Brett, your ex-husband once 
aimed a blow at you. Did — did he 
land? 

Charming Young Actress — Yes, sir; 
he landed in the divorce court. — Chi- 
cago Tribune. 



Similarity. — Stubb — What's Jenks 
making all that fuss about? 

Penn — His wife gave him a roll- 
top desk for a birthday present and 
he says it reminds him of her. 

Stubb— In what way? 

Penn — It won't shut up. — Chicago 
News. 



A Change. — "Do you think political 
methods would change if women were 
allowed to vote?" 

"Somewhat," replied the old cam- 
paigner. "When you wanted to treat 
the crowd you'd have to order ice 
cream and chicken salad." — Washing- 
ton Star. 



The Ready Jester. — "These auto- 
mobiles have given us a good deal of 
a setback on the farm this year," said 
Mrs. Corntossel. 
"In what way?" 

"Every time Hiram hears one o' 
them honks he thinks it's the dinner 
horn an' quits work." — Washington 
Star. 



An Invitation 

We Invite deposits from everyone — 
rich, poor, old and young. We recog- 
nize no classes but treat large and 
small depositors with the same cour- 
tesy and consideration. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

783 MARKET STREET, near Fourth 
San Francisco 



Bagley's Navy 



Plug 



A fllMC CHEW 
Give It a Trial 



THE MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK 

Chronicle Building. 
Successor to 

THE SCANDINAVIAN SAVINGS BANK 

Oflfers to depositors the advantage of an INCOME from money de- 
posited and the PROTECTION afforded by a NATIONAL BANK. 
Interest Paid on Term Deposits. 
Depositary for the United States. 

State of California 
City and County of San Francisco 




ESTABLISHCD 1686 



United States 
Watch Gub 

C. r. COLLINS. Manatfar 

Watches, Diamonds and Jewelry 



FINE WATCH REPAIRING 

9 Mission St., Rooms 9 & 10 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

W. L. Douglas Shoes 

AGENTS FOR 

STOCKTON VICUNA FLANNELS, BEST MADE. 

UP-TO-DATE STYLES IN SUITS AT REASONABLE PRICES 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC. 

FAIR PRICES. RELIABLE GOODS. 

50 EAST ST., and 4 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING. 




ACENT I 



S. tOVHNMEIIT CNUTS IND NtlTICU PgillCATIOIH 
HTDOCUPNIC ANO CEOSETIC 



H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MAR.KET STREET 

Ctrl •! Surimiito iid Mirkit Its.. SAM FIAMCISCO. CAL 

DKALCR IN 

Watches, Chronometers, Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods, Diamonds 



MARINE ca, FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Ratea Determined by Tranait Obaetvation 
C^nONOMKTCns «NO Sextants Rrntsd 



J. COHEN S. CO. 
Baltimore Clothing Store 

NEXT TO SAILORS' UNION HALL 

HEADQUARTERS FOR UNION LABEL GOODS. 

California Flannels, Clothing, Furnishing Goods and Outfitters. Boss of the Road 

Overalls, 75 cents. Union Label Lace Back, 85 cents. 

Union Label Hickory Shirts, SO cents. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F. 

UNION LABEL HATS, SHOES AND CLOTHING 

AGENTS FOR CLOVERLEAF RED SOLE BOOTS— GUARANTEED. 




Eyes Examined Free 



^^ 



Repairing Our Specialty 






UIVION 




James 3i. 3orensen 
Sr«a ff/»tf Jr«as. 



JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 
715 MARKET STREET - - - Near Call BIdg. 
2593 MISSION STREET - - • Near 22nd St. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

The Largest Jewelry Store, with the Largest Stock at 
the Lowest Prices 

ALL WATCH REPAIRING WARRANTED FOR TWO 
YEARS 



UNITED STATES NAUTICAL COLLEGE 

CAPT. J.G. HITCHFIELD, F. R. G. S., Principal 

This Modem Navigation School has no superior In the world to-day. 
As a practical navigator the Principal can claim without ostentation to rank 
second to none, and has the right experience and ability to teach you up-to-date 
methods In a systematic and easy manner. You can And one or more of our pupils 
on most any vessel sailing out of this port. ASK THEM. 

Advice on Maritime Law, Ship's Business and Naturalization FREE. 
Evenings By Appointment. 

SPECIAL COURSE IN WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY. 
no MARKET ST., S. F. Visitors Welcome. T*l*p> ine Kaarny ««M 




GOODGOOD^ 
MARKET AND SIXTH STS. 

Announces a 
Sale of 

Men's German 

Wool Socks 

25c Pair 



SOCKS THAT ARE AMERI- 
CAN MADE. BUT ON GER- 
.M.\X .MACHINES. IN THIS 
WAY VOU GET PRACTICAL- 
ITY LM PORTED GOODS FOR 
HALF THE ORDINARY PRICE 
AT 25c THE PAIR. 




Charles Lyons 



London 
Tailor 



719 Market St., Near 3rd 

Branch Store 

1432 Fillmore St. 
C. BREINING 

Representing Marine District 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

808 THIRD STREET, 

Bet. King and Barry 8ts., San Francisco 

GENTS', BOYS', AND 
YOUTHS' CLOTHING 

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, etc.. Boots, Shoes. Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Out- 
fits a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at the 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake — Look for the Name 
and Number. 



WHITE PALACE GOOD- 
YEAR SHOE RE- 
PAIRING CO. 

JOE WEISS, Prop. 

56 East St., bet. Market and 

Mission, San Francisco 

Always in stock full lines 
of Union-Made and Govern- 
ment shoes, new and second- 
hand. 

Your old shoes made new. We use 
the best leather in the market. 

Half Soles, sewed 75 cts. 

Half Soles, sewed, and Heels. . . .$1.00 

Rubber Heels 50 cts. 

All Work Guaranteed! 





FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXIV. No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26. 1910. 



Whole No. 2092. 



LABOR'S DIFFERENCES WITH MARKS. 



WE SHARE WITH MR. MARKS a de- 
sire to clear the way to a better un- 
derstanding between the two sides in 
the labor market — the men engaged in buying 
labor power and the men engaged in selling it. 
We trust that neither readers in general nor he 
and his fellow labor-power buyers will derive 
from our differences from his views, which his 
article in the Independent brings us to express, 
any impression that what we write has any 
other motive than that of making plain just as 
they exist certain facts of import to both sides. 
And we hope that no one will regard us as over- 
precise respecting an insignificant point when 
we feel constrained to enter an objection to a 
phrase in Mr. Marks' very first sentence. The 
differences between the buyers and sellers of la- 
bor power are more exactly described by saying 
that they are differences between employers and 
employed rather than between "capital and la- 
bor." It very often happens, especially in this 
country, that the employed are collectively pos- 
sessed of no mean amount of capital, and in cases 
the employer, even on a considerable scale, is 
himself not much of a capitalist. The laws of 
a country may favor capital, so termed in the 
sense of property, and discriminate against la- 
bor, so termed in the sense of the working 
classes, but in the matter of trade unionism the 
two bargaining factors are accurately described 
when we speak of them as the employers and 
the employed. In the question of differences be- 
tween them inert matter is not ranged up in con- 
test with other inert matter, as the phrase "cap- 
ital vs. labor" might imply. Two sets of rnen 
are contending over their shares in the division 
of the product in which they both have interest. 
They have a common interest in turning out that 
product; they have opposing interests in its di- 
vision. The one set employs; the other set is 
employed. 

If, as Mr. Marks holds, "employers do riot 
discuss their attitude to organized labor with 
sufficient freedom or frequency to enlighten the 
popular mind," it may well be for the reason 
that all the world knows that employers, being 
commonlv actuated by business principles for 
themselves alone, seek in pursuance thereof the 
best results to be possibly obtained out of their 
employes. Business would impose on the ern- 
ployed classes a morality of its own. Had it 
run along unchecked by the employed, this busi- 
ness morality would have the wage-workers of 
America to-day marked down a good many 
notches below their present market rates. The 
labor power of employes, which is their very 
life, being classed in his bookkeeping by the em- 
ployer among the commodities purchased in the 
general market, he usually regards it as to his 
interest when that labor is abundant, and there- 
fore to be had on his terms. 

Mr Marks' classification of shops lacks a bot- 
tom principle. It is merely an attempt at sub.sti- 
tuting employing-class terms and irrelevancies 
for trade-union terms and actual facts regarding 
unionism. Trade unionists deny that there is 
such a thing as a "Closed Shop" or an Open 
Shop" With trade-unionism as a bottom prin- 
ciple there are but two classes of employes, 
unionists and non-unionists. Hence, the work- 



ers engaged by an employer are either union or 
non-union. 

To make these assertions plain: There is no 
"Closed Shop," because there is no closed union. 
Any qualified non-union wage-worker can enter 
any union shop through the union door. 

When an employer forms a treaty with the 
union, formal or tacit, his shop is union, even 
if the union consents, for the time being, not to 
disturb any non-union men among the employes. 

If the employer will not treat with the union, 
or pay the union scale, his shop is non-union 
though among its employes may be union mem- 
bers. 

The deciding point as to whether a force of 
employes is union or non-union is the employer's 
actual recognition of union regulations. In 
cases, this point may not be clear to union repre- 
sentatives themselves. But it is nevertheless a 
fact. For example, some organizations of rail- 
road employes are at times spoken of as work- 
ing under "Open Shop" conditions. The truth 
is, first, that the qualifications to begin work in 
these classes of occupations are not similar to 
the qualifications required in the trades. In 
some respects, as to physique and habits, they 
are often more exacting and of themselves op- 
erate as effectually in keeping out possible anti- 
unionists as trade union rules do in other occu- 
pations. Again, the necessities of insurance and 
fellowship act in such occupations as a union 
pressure of a most compelling character. In 
exceptional cases, due to peculiar circumstances, 
railroad employes may remain outside the un- 
ions and union men work with them because, 
certain as they are of the solidarity of the mass, 
the latter arc aware it is infinitely better for 
the union to ignore the exceptions. 

We must call into question Mr. Marks' asser- 
tion that "the unions often undertake the strug- 
gle for the Closed Shop even when only a very 
few non-union men stand in the way of com- 
plete organization." It may be true that they at 
times do so when workers have won on princi- 
ple and could afford comparative trifles to pass, 
but on others because the retention of the non- 
unionists signifies a purpose on the employers' 
part of injuring the union with the rise of an 
opportunity. We are able to cite numerou.s cases 
in which employers have wished to retain old 
non-union hands, or persons in classifications not 
recognized by the strict letter of the unionists, 
and the unions have given their consent. 

Passing by Mr. Marks' first and second sub- 
divisions of shops, which we regard as non- 
union, with respect to the third our experience 
is that no such shop exists. It is alleged that 
there are forces of employes who are paid more 
than the union scale, and among whom are union 
men, but to assert that any of the latter are 
safe from discrimination is contrary to the light 
of experience. 

Mr. Marks' fourth subdivision describes what 
we should call a union shop, special reasons exist- 
ing as we have pointed out in the case of rail- 
road men — why the non-unionists for the time 
being are harmless. His sixth and seventh sub- 
divisions are, as he says, union. 

There is nothing whatever in Mr. Marks class- 
ification, we repeat, that possesses any logical 
force tending to remove our conviction that there 



are but two divisions of employes or of forces 
of employes — union and non-union. 

"The employer," says Mr. Marks, "rarely es- 
tablishes the closed shop voluntarily. His fear 
is that he will lose control of his business," etc. 
How about the employe losing control of his 
business? 

There is a well defined principle in law and in 
otliics that tliose who are the beneficiaries of, 
and who participate in the advantages accruing 
from, an agreement or a contract shall bear an 
equal share of the duties and obligations result- 
ing from the enforcement of such an agreement 
or contract. This is true of government, of law 
and of treaties between governments; that it 
equally applies to a joint agreement (collective 
bargaining) between employers and employed 
governing wages, hours of labor and conditions 
of employment, is obvious. 

(1) Restriction of Output.— On this Mr. 
Marks says: "When a man does not do his best 
he wrongs his employers as well as himself." 
That is, the employe ought to work sixteen hours 
a day, force all his powers to the last point short 
of breaking down, and if he is employed in steel 
works, keep at it seven days a week. Does Mr. 
Marks mean that? We know he doesn't. But 
tliat is where the spirit and letter of his "business 
morality," as he repeats one of its tenets, brings 
him. 

We have known employes to work sixteen 
hours a day and to have fault found with them 
because their work was not up to the best grade. 
The fact is. there is no occupation in which un- 
restricted competition in accordance with the 
business code of morality would not to-morrow 
extend the workday in America by several hours, 
develop speeding to a sweatshop rate, and de- 
press wages below the American standard of liv- 
ing And equally the fact is tliat employers of 
mechanics in general gauge their expectations of 
the average employe by the output of the strong- 
est and most gifted in the trade. There are 
big shops in this country in which the record 
time for the making of every piece of work is 
entered in the books, and every man on similar 
work knows he is being measured by that record. 
Wherever piecework is possible, employers are 
prone to take the highest weekly earnings of the 
swiftest pieceworkers and quote them as what 
tney pay, or have paid, and then call for general 
reductions of wages because of the "enormous" 
sums their employes arc making. As a rule, with 
modern machinery in industry, the slow man 
must keep up with his team as the machine is 
speeded to its greatest velocity or he is "let out." 

Justice has cried out for a "restriction to out- 
put," as output is often exemplified by employ- 
ers. An outraged public opinion has of recent 
years dech'red that there should be no factory 
output by children of tender age. There has 
been a restriction of the output of the work of 
young persons, of women, and in cases of men. 
Board of health regulations have imposed limits 
to output. The more one looks into the question 
the more clearly is seen the necessity of limiting 
output at the point where the exertion for out- 
put entails injury to the race. And, equally, each 
individual must guard his powers so that they 
will last him his normal working years. Many a 
ni.'ii spurred "to do his best" has as a result 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



wrecked his health, strength and life. Our own 
broad experience justifies us in saying that over- 
work and the risks that wage-workers take have 
done more harm to this country tli.in the abuse 
of alcohol. 

.And what have American employers done to 
fight these evils? As to the national shame and 
scandal of injuries to the wage-workers, Ameri- 
can employers as a class are behind the em- 
ployers of all other civilized nations. They are 
only now waking up when compensation has be- 
come a fact with the other leading governments 
of the world. As to "doing his best" while at 
work, the spirit of the .American workingman 
calls for "a fair day's work — for a fair day's 
pay." No gang of American wage-workcr.s can 
be found backing a loafer against a fair em- 
ployer. 

In all the world there are no workers whose 
production is so great, in the aggregate and 
per man, as that of the toilers of America. 

Opposition to machinery docs not now, and 
never did, cut any figure in the general policy of 
American trade unions. Talk about it is empty 
preaching against non-existent sin. 

(2^ Limitation of Apprentices. — What is an 
"undue" limitation? Business morality would 
whenever possible put the number of apprentices 
to the point only short of reducing the value of 
the work to be turned out. In fact, it has done 
so. There are no apprentices in a very large 
proportion of industrial establishments whose 
work requires merely machine attendants. In 
many trades, strictly speaking, many employers 
don't want to bother with apprentices. In very 
few occupations are employers in the United 
States al)le to formulate precise demands upon 
the unions for a more liberal apprentice system. 
Where have they done so, taking on themselves 
the responsibility of teaching the apprentices? 
What they usually want is, that the journeymen 
should teach boys how to take their places soon. 

The fact of the matter is that modern industry, 
with its new machinery and new tools, has largely 
rendered "trades" obsolete. The trades have 
been divided, subdivided, and specialized. _To 
burden a discussion of economic and social im- 
portance with the question of apprentices in mod- 
ern industry is evidence of ponderosity rather 
than profundity. 

(3) Uniform Wage. — The employer takes on 
enough employes to do his work, and no more. 
He never hires an "under-average workingman" 
until he must. When work slacks up he lets 
the least profitable man go — other things being 
equal. For the unions to abolish their present 
minimum wage would be merely shifting the 
present point of discussion over wages down to 
a lower nick. Present minimum wages have been 
established on the employes discovering by ex- 
perience that an industry would bear them, and 
perhaps more. Pity for "the unfortunate, dull 
workingman," if thoroughly accepted by trade 
unionists, would result in the unlimited charity 
that means suicide. 

But as a matter of fact, as to the merit of the 
charge that trade unions establish a uniform 
wage, as that term is generally interpreted, there 
is no truth in it. The unions declare for and 
aim to establish a minimum wage — a life line, 
beyond which the workers protest against being 
forced. Look the world over and there will be 
found a minimum wage — a wage below which 
the workers will refuse to toil. In China it 
mav be six cents a day, sufficient to buy rice; in 
meals" a day with all that is implied by an .\mer- 
meals' a day with all that is implied by an Amer- 
ican standard of life. .And it is a libel on our 
people to declare that they are unable or unwill- 
ing to pay such a minimum wage to the men and 
women of labor who perform a great material 
service to society and who make modern civil- 
ized life and progress possible. 

(4) Secondary Boycott.— Mr. Marks avers it 
as his belief that "the secondary boycott is uni- 
versally and strongly condemned by employers 
and by the public." We have not heard that 
"the public" hag ever taken a vote on this ques- 
tion. But well do we know that if there is any 
one universal function performed by all classes 
it is the boycott. 

But quite apart from this, the boycott is sim- 
ply another name for the right to patronize or 
not to patronize a business man. That right is 
inherent in every human being. No one has a 
property ri.ght in the patronage of another. 
What one may lawfully do can not by any spe- 
cious argument be made unlawful when that law- 
ful right is exercised by two or more persons in 
common. This fundamental right applies either 
in the first or second instance, either in the pri- 
mary or in the so-called secondary boycott. 

(5) The Svmpathetic Strike.— There is one fact 
of prime social significance which the employing 
class, which includes Mr. Marks' "public," fails 
to understand. The workingman has a legal and 
moral right to stop work when he pleases. More- 
over, it has been on occasions his only method 
of rebelling against social injustice. We grant 
that here is a very broad question both in ethics 
and as to policy. It is perfectly true that just 
as an ordinary strike should be avoided by all 
means possible, that before having recourse to 
it trade unionists should hesitate long and weigh 
well every conceivable efifect, so the sympathetic 
strike is a weapon never to be used while pa- 
tience, forbearance, and argument may bring jus- 

(Continued on Page 7.) 



APPEAL FOR LOS ANGELES. 



The following appeal for aid on behalf of 
the strikers in Los Angeles has been issued 
by the California State Federation of Labor: 

C.\I.IFORNIA STATE FEDERATION OF LABOR, 

San Francisco, Cal., October LS, 1910. 
To the Trade Unionists of California ; — 

The struggle for the preservation of trade- 
unionism in Los Angeles continues with un- 
abated courage, energy and confidence. After 
a week's sojourn in Los Angeles, the dele- 
gates to the recent convention of the Cali- 
fornia State Federation of Labor have re- 
turned to their respective hoines throughout 
the State firmly convinced that the Los An- 
geles Employers' Association has essayed 
a task impossible of accomplishment. Re- 
fore leaving, and only after thoroughly re- 
viewing the strike situation, the delegates 
present, representing 45,000 organized men 
and women, on October 4th, unanimously 
adopted the following resolution : 

"Resolved, That it be the sense of the 
Eleventh Annual Convention of the Cali- 
fornia State Federation of Labor that the 
strikes now on in Los .\ngeles be continued 
until real industrial freedom obtains, and un- 
til men and women are conceded the right 
to organize and to say what conditions shall 
obtain in their crafts, and to that end this 
convention guarantee them every ounce of 
moral and financial support." 

The Executive Council of the Federation 
was al.so directed to issue this statement and 
appeal for a continuance of the financial sup- 
port so willingly and generally rendered dur- 
ing the past four months. 

Brothers and Sisters in the labor move- 
ment of California, this letter is not sent to 
you merel)' as an appeal ; it is issued to im- 
press upon you one fact : The strikes in Los 
Angeles must be won, and will be won, any- 
thing said to the contrary notwithstanding. 
There arc positively no desertions from the 
striking unions; there is absolutely not one 
reason for doubt regarding ultimate victory 
by the striking unions. During the week be- 
fore the "Times"' explosion, which is now 
being investigated by a special committee 
of the State Federation of Labor, there was 
a pronounced feeling of distress among the 
members of the Employers' Association, in- 
dicating that their fight against organized 
labor was about at an end. Strange as it 
may seem, the "Times" explosion inspired 
the labor crushers with new* courage in their 
hopeless attempt to destroy organization 
among the workers. Certain newspapers 
owned by the interests actually endeavored 
to utilize that deplorable disaster in their 
"union-busting" crusade by tendering much 
unsolicited advice to the strikers and urging 
them to "call off the strikes." 

As already stated, the strikes will go on 
until the employers of Los Angeles agree to 
the principle of collective bargaining. 

The issue is the same to-day as on the 
first day of this memorable struggle : "The 
right of workers to organize and to voice 
their demands and grievances through their 
organization." 

This is the only issue at stake, and it is 
worth fighting for and worthy of assistance 
from every union man and woman in Cali- 
fornia. 

■Make your response as quickly and gen- 
erously as possible ! 

Fraternally, 

D. D. Sullivan, President; Paul Scharren- 



berg, Secretary-Treasurer, Labor Temple, 
316 Fourteenth street, San Francisco; 
Chris. Ploeger, W. A. Engle, Tom C. Sea- 
ward, A. L. Jones, James Hurley, R. W. 
Thiterington, Harry .Menke, D. J. Murphy, 
AI. Condrotte, L. B. Leavitt, John W. 
Ericksen, Ira H. Markwith, vice-presidents. 



SPREAD OF CHRISTIANITY. 



The 106th annual report of the British and 
I'^oreign Bible Society, just publi.shed, shows 
that the total issues for the last year were as 
follows: Bibles. 843,784; New Testaments, 
1.198.226; portions, 4.578,014. Totals, 6,620,- 
024. 

The marked increase in the issues during 
the last year is chiefly due to the advance of 
Chri.-;tianity in the Far East. More than 1,- 
500,000 copies of the Scriptures went to China, 
356,000 to Corea and 305.000 to Japan. Li 
India, including liurmah and Ceylon, the cir- 
cidation rose to 780,000. 

In South America 155,000 copies and in 
■Canada 148,000 copies were put into the hands 
of the people, while 1,115,000 copies were dis- 
tributed in Continental Europe. 

The Gospels have been puiilished in six new 
languages during the last year. St. Matthew 
has been published in Ongom. the speech of a 
powerful Bantu tribe inhabiting the basin of 
the Gabun River in I'rench Congo. St. Mat- 
thew and St. John have been published in 
Namau, the speech of 40,000 cannibals on the 
south coast of British New Guinea. For two 
tribes in New Caledonia, St. Mark and St. 
John are printed in Houallou and St. Mark in 
l^onerihouen. 

l-'or the Solomon Islands, St. Matthew has 
been printed in Mwala, while St. Luke has 
been issued in Raga, spoken on Whitsuntide 
Island, in the New Hebrides. 

.Ml these six languages were reduced to 
written form in order that they might become 
vehicles of the Gospel. For the subjects of 
the Emperor Menelek a complete New Testa- 
ment has at last been published in Tigrinya, a 
Semitic language spoken by 3,000,000 people 
in the Tigrc Province of Abyssinia. 

In Braille type for the blind new books of 
the Bible were completed last year in Welsh, 
Spanish, Italian, Gujarati and two Chinese 
dialects. The reissue of the English Bible in 
revised Braille has now been completed. Since 
its foundation, in 1904, the Bible society has 
issued over 222,000,000 copies of the Scrip- 
tures. 



Germany does a very large and profitable 
trade with other countries in books printed 
in the German language. It may be noted 
that a largely increasing quantity is being 
sent every )'ear to Japan. To the latter 
country the books expoi ted are mainly those 
of a scientific and practical nature for use 
in the schools and colleges. 



The steamer Mexico Maru, built at the 
Mitsubishi dockyard, Nagasaki, to the or- 
der of the Osaka Shosen Kai.sha, has been 
successfully launched. The steainer is one 
of the six large steamers newly constructed 
by the company for its American service. It 
has a displacement of 6.000 tons, with 15 
knots spccfl. 



In original jurisdiction the P>ritish Chief 
Justice at Hongkong has granted the Port- 
land Flouring Mills a perpetual injunction 
against Soares & Co. with regard to an in- 
fringement of trade-mark on flour bags. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



JUVENILE LABOR EXCHANGES. 



JAPAN ON THE OCEAN. 



The labor exchange recently established 
by the British Board of Trade has proved 
so efficient in finding employment that it 
is now proposed to include in the lists of 
those registered children in attendance at 
day or evening- schools who will shortly be 
leaving and seeking positions. 

The local school attendance subcommittee, 
after conferring with representatives of the 
labor department of the Board of Trade and 
with the president of the board of educa- 
tion, has recommended that the education 
committee cooperate with the local branch 
of the labor exchange, subject to certain 
conditions, the most important of which are 
as follows : 

That children attending school shall be 
registered for employment only at their 
school, and that if any such children make 
direct applications to the central labor bu- 
reau they shall be referred back to their 
school. 

That lists of children and young people 
about to leave school shall be sent in to the 
education office at the close of each month 
by the head teachers or superintendents con- 
cerned, and that the local labor exchange 
manager shall have authority to make copies 
of these lists. 

That all applications liy employers for the 
services of children or young people leaving 
day or evening schools shall be made direct 
to the labor exchange, and that employers 
making request to the education offices for 
such juvenile labor shall be referred to the 
labor exchange. 

That in all cases of application from em- 
ployers for the labor of young persons whose 
names are included in the lists aliove men- 
tioned the labor exchange manager shall 
either request the education committee to 
send to him the names of young persons 
who appear suitable for the employment m 
question or shall forward to the education 
committee, for its remarks, the names of 
those candidates provisionally selected by 
the labor exchange as apparently suitable to 
fill the vacancies in question. 

The purpose of these regulations is to se- 
cure the advantages of co-operation between 
the school authorities and the labor ex- 
change, and this can be best accomplished 
by requiring all children who apply for po- 
sitions to do so only through the school they 
attend, and all employers who need the serv- 
ices of such persons to make application 
only through the labor exchange. Each 
school sends its list to the labor bureau, and 
thus the latter is retained as the central 
medium of exchange, avoiding the confusion 
and irregularities that might arise if em- 
ployers inquired among the various schools 
for suitable assistants, and furnishing the 
bureau with a full list of all students in the 
city ready for employment. An especially 
valuable feature of this last will be its state- 
ments from teachers and superintendents as 
to the aliility, character, and general qualifi- 
cations of each of the applicants. 



A contract has been made with the Pear- 
son Company, of London, for dredging and 
deepening the harbor at Guaymas. The har- 
bor is to be deepened so that vessels of 
large tonnage can enter and discharge car- 
goes at the docks. A part of the land on 
one side of the bay is to be reclaimed, which 
the company is to receive in addition to 
$3,500,000 gold for their work. 



Statistics compiled by the Scientific 
American regarding the wide-awake policy 
of Japan in building up a merchant marine, 
must prove startling to the average Ameri- 
can, who complacently regards this country 
as "the greatest ever," and smiles indul- 
gently when the progressiveness of the Ori- 
ental races is mentioned. These figures and 
an outline of the Japanese policy ought to 
compel every citizen to do a little thinking, 
for there certainly is food for thought in 
the fact that, as the Scientific American 
says, "The registered tonnage of vessels 
built and owned by Japanese has risen from 
657,000 tons in 1902 to 1,189,957 tons at the 
end of 1909." 

As compared with the vessels built in this 
country, which are destined to carry the 
American flag, the amount is as a mountain 
to an ant hill. And the reason is not far to 
seek. It is a well-known fact that Japan 
gives bounties to native builders for the con- 
struction of trade vessels; it also gives navi- 
gation subsidies to all twelve-knot ships of 
over 3000 tons that are owned by Japanese 
subjects. With this encouragement from 
the Government it is little wonder that the 
Japanese merchant marine is becoming one 
of the leading trade fleets of the world. It 
is little wonder that the country dominates 
or will soon dominate the Pacific. 

And in the meantime this country folds 
its hands and complacently watches anoth- 
er nation gather in trade that should belong 
to us. The time may come when this short- 
sighted policy will be regretted. — Philadel- 
phia Enquirer. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



SPANISH SARDINE INDUSTRY. 



The sardine industry at Vigo, Spain, gives 
employment to about 23,000 people, of whom 
8,000 are women. The wages of the men 
range from 80 cents to $1 per clay, and of 
the women from 25 to 35 cents. The fish- 
ing fleet consists of about 150 steamers and 
about 2,000 sailing and other craft. The 
steamers are used exclusively for bream, 
hake, and similar fishing, and all other craft 
for sardines. Of the catch of bream, hake, 
etc., about 90 per cent, is for consumption 
in Spain and only 10 per cent, for preserving 
purposes. Of the sardine catch 80 per cent, 
is preserved, 10 per cent, consumed locally, 
and 10 per cent shipped to the interior of 
Spain. 

There are more than 100 sardine packing 
factories in this district, many of which were 
compelled to cease operations for months in 
1909 because of the scarcity of fish. The 
value of preserved sardines exported during 
1909 was $2,203,500, of which $730,400 went 
to Argentina, $551,500 to France, $194,700 
to the United States and possessions, $169,- 
200 to Germany, and the remainder to other 
countries. The value of the exports in 1908 
was $2,673,725. 



The increase in the cost of rubber is 
shown by the fact that, while Brazil's ex- 
ports for the year ending June 30th were 
almost exactly the same in quantity as two 
years ago, their value was one-fifth more. 



The largest ancient mosaic ever found, 
covering over 4500 square yards, was un- 
earthed recently at the site of Aquielcis, tlie 
Roman city that was destroyed by Atilla in 
425. 



International Seamen's Union of America, \]/i 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Subdivisions. 
Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union, \yi Lewis St., 
Boston, Mass. 

Maritime Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Atlantic and Gulf, 28 South St., New York. 

AL-irine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Inland Seamen's Union, Whitehall, New York. 
Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 143 West Madison St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y, 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 44-46 East St., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 51 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle. 
Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmcn's Union, 51 
Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Australasia. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., .Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

25 Arcade. Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf, Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 
Great Britain. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E., 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Railway 
St., Hull. 

Belgium. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, Diepestr 
152, Antwerpen, Belgium. 

Germany. 

Zentralverband Seemannischer Arbeiter, Ham- 
burg 1, Bensenbinderhof 57, IV., Zimmer 54 
(Gewerkschaftshaus), Germany. 

France. 

Federation National des Syndicats des Inscripts 
Maritimes de France, Marseille, 11 Place de la 
Joliette. 

Norway. 

Norsk Sjomands Forbund, Stavanger, Norway. 

Sweden. 
Svenska-Sjomens-og Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 
Denmark. 
Somandcnes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Holdbod- 
gade 11, Kid., Denmark. 

Sofyrbodcrnes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Told- 
boldgade 8, Denmark. 

Holland. 
Algemeene Ncdcrlandsche Zeemansbond, 2 e 
Atjehstr. 6, Amsterdam. 

Italy. 
Fcderazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del Mare, 
Geneva Vico Casosini, No. 8, Italy. 
Austria. 
Verband dcr Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbciterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Boschetto 5, Austria. 

Spain. 

Federacion Nacional de Obreros de Mar de 
Buques v puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 (Bar- 
celoneta), Spain. 

Uruguay. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Marjneros, Monte- 
video, Rampla 103, Uruguay. 

Argentina. 
Lega Obrera (Sailors and Firemen) Sinforiano 
Corvctto. Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos) 
und Suarez 44. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



World's Workers. 



The olive pickers on the Olivewood 
Estate, Rennark, South Australia, 
have gone on strike for higher rates. 

Affiliated with the British General 
Federation of Miners there are 137 
societies, with a total nicniliersliip 
of 700,000. 

During the month of July 450 as- 
sisted emigrants left England for 
Queensland. Australia, many of them 
being artisans. 

Canada has decided that after Oc- 
tober immigrants must liave £10 be- 
fore they will be allowed to land in 
that country. 

Mr. Barnett. secretary of the Aus- 
tralian Miners' Association, at Bro- 
ken Hill, has made an official state- 
ment that at present there are 500 
members of his union out of work. 

A mass meeting of unionists at 
Broken Hill, Australia, has decided 
that no unionist in future shall work 
with anj' man who refuses to join the 
union in his calling. 

The Victorian C.\ustralia) Carpcn 
ters' Wages Board, which is one of 
the latest constituted industrial tri- 
bunals, has decided that the minimum 
rate of pay shall be lis. 2d. per day. 

Combined labor in West Australia 
is organizing rural unions, with a 
view to abolishing the 2Ss. a week 
rate for farm laborers, and getting an 
Arbitration Court order at so much 
an hour. 

Employes of the French Nortliern 
Railroad went on strike on October 
11, and the strike spread to the West- 
ern Railroad, which is owned by the 
State. The strike involved about 80,- 
000 men. 

A strike of miners occurred re- 
cently at Heddon Greta (New South 
Wales) colliery. All the men are out 
save those on contract. The New 
South Wales coal miners can't be beat 
as fighting unionists. 

The operations of the labor bureau 
in Victoria, Australia, are to be ex- 
tended to country districts, and the 
police will be instructed to act as 
agents in assisting to find work for 
the unemployed. 

A bricklayers' strike has begun at 
Geelong, Australia, the men demand- 
ing the Melbourne rate of 12s. a day. 
Twenty bricklayers are idle. Two 
non-unionists started work, but were 
induced to join the society. 

A meeting composed of the lar.gie 
majority of the artists of Melbourne, 
Australia, who apply their talents to 
commercial purposes, has been held, 
and a decision arrived at to form a 
trade-union affiliated with the Trades 
Hall. 

During 1909 the Wade Government 
(New South Wales) employed 2502 
policemen to be turned loose under 
"Gregory the Terrible's" orders, with 
baton and manacles, on the miners 
who were game to stand up for their 
rights. 

The directors of the French rail- 
roads involved in the strike agreed to 
grant a minimum wage of $1 a day 
to the employes of all lines runnin.i? 
out of Paris. The new scale will go 
into effect January 1 and constitutes 
the chief concession demanded by the 
men. 

The negotiations that havO been go- 
ing on to prevent a lockout of the 
German metal workers have failed 
thus far. Nearly one hundred thou- 
sand men are affected in Berlin alone, 
while it is estimated that at least 500,- 
000 throughout Germany will be 
locked out. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

SAN PEDRO ---------- California 



BEN. B. LIPPMAN 

532 BEACON & 531 FRONT, next to Fritz & Ernett 
SAN PEDRO CAL. 

COMPLETE SEAMEN'S OUTFITTERS 

Un'on Good* for Union Men 



SAN PEDRO WHOLESALE CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN THE CHOICEST OF OLD 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

Bottlers of San Francisco and Los Angeles Beers. 
All goods sold at lowest San Fr.Tncisco prlt-es. We buy direct from Kentucky 
Distilleries and our California Wineries. Seafarlnt; men Invited to Inspect 9ur 
stock. 

Beacon Street, near Fourth. SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



M. B RO WIN 



THE SAN FRANCISCO STORE 
Now Located at San Pedro, 
427 FRONT STREET. 
I carry a full line of San Franolsco goods for the seafaring people, 
having been established since 1S86, and continually serving the seafaring. 
I am in position to know the class of goods you want. Tb> San Francisco 
Hickory Shirt at SO cents. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



him. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 



GiSTER^^ 



JOHN A. MOFFITT. President, Orangs, N. J. 
VIARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place. Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



CHAS. A. LUCAS 

Undertaker and Embalmer 

Fourth Street, 

Between Front and Beacon Sis., 

SAN PEDRO. 



H. N. STONE CO. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Headquarters for Pure Drugs, Patent 

Medicines, Soaps and Toilet 

Articles. 

FSONT ST., GPP. 8. P. DEPOT, 

■AN PEDRO, CAL. 



WALK-OVER SHOES 

SOLD EXCLUSIVFLY BY 

LEVY'S DEPT. STORE 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

B15 Front St. 614 Beacon St. 



SAN PEDRO NEWS CO. 

Sixth and Beacon Sts., San Pedro, Cat 

Dealers In 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY. 

1/08 Angeles Examiner and All San Fran- 
cisco Papers on Sale. 

An-onts Harbor Steam Laundry. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 

Non-Union factories. I 

NO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

William McGrail, of Baltimore, 
Md., who sailed on the Atlantic and 
Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 
years, is inquired for by his brother, 
George McGrail, 603 Decatur street, 
Vew Orleans, La. 

James Murphy, marine fireman, 
last heard of from Sydney, and sup- 
posed to be sailing out of San Fran- 
cisco, is inquired for by Ellen Mur- 
phy, Lawrence St., Liverpool. 



I INFORMATION WANTED. 

j Soren P. Nielsen, a native of 

I .'\arhus, Denmark, born 1887, is in- 

; quired for by his sister. Address, 

Danish Consulate, New Orleans," La. 

.Mbert Walace Briner, a boy aged 

16, who left his home at Chester, Pa., 

and is supposed to have shipped from 

l^hiladelphia in the latter part of 

June, is anxiously inciuired for by his 

father. Please address Frank Breiner, 

220 W. 5th St., Chester, Pa. 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Aire. Oscar Le Bloa, Sylvian 

Anderson, T. -557 Larsen. J. -1542 

Anderson, J. G. Miclielson, J. 

.\l)ell, B. Moss, A. 

Andersson, G. -41 Menz, Paul 

Andersen, A. M. Meyer, H. 

-1055 Moore, J. M. 

Andersen. A. 1447 Mesak, Eduard 

Anderson, J. -1514 McDonough. W. 

AU;iins. Jacob Marotli, Richard 

Ambcarnsen, Algoy Mueller. Hugo 

Vpps p Nielsen, Sivert 

Anderson, Martin Nielsen, A. -1054 

Anderson. Ch.ulie Newman. David 

Aiuier.son. Gust Nevander, Alex. 

Anderssen, Frank O.'^'^'^"' •'°'},", ^■ 

Andersun, Carl Nordgren^ Chas. 

Arrhenius, Chas. ^?,^"""' J^''?'^" 

Behrend. F. C. ^ilsen. J. -780 

Uiiry, James ^°''^- E'"}' 

Backman, Ernest ?^2r=^'S"vVVo 

Mrnnrler \m NelSOn, Eddie 

Blander. \\. Nicholas, Thomas 

Bostioiu, \\ . Nvstrom R 

Hentsen. Hans r^iMJ^ \,-ii:i»,^.,, 

Boylaii. C. J. (pkg) g Le^"p^^^1l'"^'^ 

B uniqu st, C. ^, • « %i ,,„« 

Boidjelm, Alex. O sson, A. P- -1109 

Bowman. K. Hj. 2^^"- ^. -!s85 

Beyerly. Rupert S'!'""' ^\.^ 

Bell. Frank M. Ottesen. Chas. 

Carlson. Carl ST®.'""??'!' ^■ 

CiMistensen. M. X>''^'' r,^' u . 

tniiistiansen, Eigil Ols^n, Hagbart 

(■•hristen-son. H. 2,"'''^"'t, . 

Dibble P W Olsen. Pete 

Eugene, John O'^en. George A. 
Emanuelsen, A. -66lX, ^""-^V' a 

Krickson. Jolin ^ ^en O e A 

Erickssen, J. E. 2L^1°"- "'S^^""''^ 

Fletcher Billv Passon. Bruno 

L'-.X linn Peachman, Geo. 

Frltl'heim. R. P^;:«°"- F-^''^^ „,., 

Frantsen.-N. -562 ^|^|oT"A^-llb2" ' 

Gustavsen, Gustav ^frf^P'^ T^hn 

Graham. L. M. E!^!^^""' -J?''" 

Gunwalds. G. pfraUs W 

Gustafson, John E!roill'„ b„/iMf 

G ion void, Peter Sfl!'!!^' n^ni^ 

GuslalsoA, Johan S!'!.^/„^"' '^"^ 

Gutman. E. P^'^^^,°"' "• ^• 

Henriksen, Albert „ V » x^ 

Hogstrom. A. Peterson, A. K 

Ueckman. Fred Persson. Hj -1230 

Iledlund, Arvid £®!'®'"^°"'r.^''??i, 

Hallnes. Magnus Petersen C. -1092 

lli.nsen. H. -20G0 g^^""'^"''"""'',^^- ^ 

lleide. Tom Petersen. M. (Pack- 

Hjelt. Nick d-^^^'tj 1 

IliUig, Albert 5T'.,^^"'t w 

Uehnar. O. (Pack- §?^?j^i'"i' \ ^■ 

,,„„, Raymond, J. 

Hinsen Carl Rodgers. Charles 

ii- rris inhn I.- Rokow. Stefan 

Hi ke Car^ Strom, Oscar 

H nsen^Peter K. |PLTrH^rm«n 

IItsstU G Sievers, Herman 

llknsen', L. -794 i?''f"/''5.'„irfM 

Hansen Hans IK^!;,^^.,^^' 

Husby, Lars i^^!^"!u "r^"%fin7 

Isaacksen. Kristen |°'^f"sen, C. -1607 

Isaacson, Guslav iS;°"j..^- %,'JV^ 
Ingebretsen. O. -125 |Pi^^,':'"K- pustav 

John. Robert l'"]lf °"i„h '^■ 

'j^aSrWit^z ■';• -^^'-'^it^lnteri^^rthur 

o^"u/sL^.V-1874 io---,,^ames 

Janson, O. W. Saarlnen. H. 

Johansen Herluf stephan. M. 

Johnstadt J. S. Samson. Kristian 

Johnsen. A. O. Svensen, G. -1579 

Johansson, A. -20aO Schlosser, L. 

.Jensen, 1311 SJostrom, Gus 
J<jhnson, G. B. ■ 



Idlings. R. V. 
Johansen, J. -1462 



Schutte, Richard 
Strom, C. -1648 

, , „,, Sholl, F. K. 

j'-allson: .Vulius ^^''^^ "• 

kIS- Fred^- '-'"' ictluter^'paul 

Kol''p',''Fra'nz S-hwanewede G. 

Kustel, Victor Tillman, A. E. 

Keilman. Joe lt'""''^V ?'*"' 

Koso Pete ^ nor, Waino 

Kusik, M. Tetter. Anton 

Kleishman, F. Tufte, A. Paulsen 

Kallas, Alex. Tuominen, Alfred 

Kristensen. Jens 7,0"»""e- .Walter 

Kallas. M. Utby. Carl 

Larsen, Martin i,?,"P r-rT . 

Laison, Jack Sr f*"^"' ^w ' w 

Lindegaid. John S '\'""'"'r.^ " i!!' 

Lewis George H. Winters^ S'i^ll^^^ 

Laisen. KlaSs L. Wng Ferdinand 

I.eith, Chas. Wychgel. J. 

Louis. Michael iX^F,"'''"' "«."'■>' 

Larsen, Cliris. T. Wallace. Luke 

Larsen. Christian ^ilemsen. H. 

Lange. Freldrich Youngren. E. 

Lvche, Harris Zorning, Arthur 

Lang, Gust. Zornow. Herbert 



When Drinking Beer 
See that this Label is 
on the Keg or Bottle 




ALL LOS ANGELES BEER 
IS UNFAIR 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Within the next few days the manufacture of 
concrete barges and boats will be commenced at 
the Sacramento (Cal.) shipyards. 

Captain John Bermingham, Supervising In- 
spector of Steamboats, was notified on October 
21 of the death at Seattle of Captain Edward G. 
Rouse, Inspector of Hulls. 

The California-Atlantic Steamship Company 
will include Seattle in its New York, via Panama, 
service, and four additional freighters have been 
chartered for the line by Bates & Chesebrough. 

William Perroni was appointed master of the 
steamer W. D. Nutz, vice F. J. Alver, and F, hi 
Anderson was enrolled as master of the steamer 
Tamalpais at the San Francisco Custom-house on 
October 22. 

The following vessels were enrolled at the San 
Francisco Custom-house on October 19: Schocm- 
er Nellie Carter, P. H. Sommer, master; steamer 
Rainier, Charles G. Lindquist, master; schooner 
Meta, William Waldeck, master. 

A. Larsen has been appointed master of the 
schooner Hecla, vice P. Soderman, and J. Mc- 
Guire of the steamer Standard, vice C. Paulson. 
The schooner Annie E. was enrolled at the San 
Francisco Custom-bouse on October 20. 

The schooner Bangor, from Port Gamble for 
San Francisco with lumber, which stranded on 
Redford Island, Beecher Bay, B. C, was floated 
on October 22 and towed to Port Townsend, 
where she will be surveyed. 

Laden with the heaviest cargo she ever carried 
and having on board 130 cabin passengers, the 
Oceanic liner Sierra, Captain Houdlette, sailed 
from San Francisco on October 22 for Honolulu. 
The cargo amounted to 3500 tons, including thir- 
teen automobiles. 

L. A. Pederson filed a suit in the United States 
District Court at San Francisco on October 17 
against the steam-schooner Olsen & Mahoney for 
$12,000 damages alleged to have been sustained 
by the bark McLauren in a collision off Point 
Arena on September 22. 

After being hard and fast on a rocky ledge off 
Fort Point, San Francisco, for eleven days, the 
British tramp steamer Damara was successfully 
floated on October 19, after the lightering of 
nearly all of her cargo of 7200 tons of barley. 
The vessel is seriously damaged. 

The most wonderful display of tlic Aurora 
Borealis ever seen by them so far south was 
witnessed at Taku on October 5 by Captain John 
Truebridge and officers and men of the steamship 
Elihu Thompson when the vessel was on her way 
from Nome to Seattle. 

The British steamer Aorangi, which is to ply 
between San Francisco and the Colonies, via Ta- 
hiti, left Wellington, N. Z., on October 19 for San 
Francisco on her maiden run in the new service 
being inaugurated by the Union Steanisliip Com- 
pany of New Zealand. 

United States Inspectors of .Steamboats Bulger 
and Bolles completed their investigation at San 
Francisco on October 21 into the collision be- 
tween the river steamer Onisbo and the steam- 
schooner laqua on the Sacramento River on Sep- 
tember 18, and took the case under advisement. 

Local shipbuilding concerns are preparing bids 
for repairs to the British tramp steamer Damara, 
which was ashore at Fort Point, and the work 
will probably begin within ten days. It is believed 
that it will cost over $100,000 to repair the big 
freighter. The loss to the steamer's cargo is 
estimated at nearly $200,000. 

That the Pacific Mail Steam.'liip Company is 
planning to establish a line of steamers which 
will operate from Seattle to New Orleans and 
New York, a railroad furnishing the connectin.g 
link over the Isthmus of Panama, was the in- 
formation received in New Orleans on Octo- 
ber 17. 

Captain Emil Francke, superintendent of the 
Pacific Coast Steamship Company at Seattle, and 
one of the most experienced shipping men on the 
Coast, who last week announced his intention of 
retiring from the service of the company, sent in 
his resignation to take effect at the end of the 
present month. 

Bringing 40.000 cases of salmon, the packet 
Star of Russia, Captain Larsen, of the Alaska 
Packers' Association, arrived at San Francisco on 
October 15, eleven days from Karluk. There are 
now two packets to come from the most south- 
erly stations, the Star of Greenl;ind and the Star 
of Scotland. 

It is reported that the steamers Harvard and 
Yale will be placed on the run between San 
Franri.'^co and Los Angeles by a strong combina- 
tion of interests in which the Western Pacific is 
dominant, and that they will furnish the Western 
Pacific with a connecting link to .Southern Cali- 
fornia. 

The new steamer now being built by the Craig 
Shipbuilding Company at Long Beach, Cal., for 
the Hammond Lumber Company is expected to 
be out the first of the year, when she will t'lke 
the place of the steamer George W. Fenwick, 
carrying lumber between Tongue Point and San 
Francisco. 



By the narrow margin of thirty-five minutes, the 
Matson liner Wilhelmina was defeated in a close 
race from Honolulu to the Golden Gate by the 
Oceanic liner Sierra. The Sierra anchored in the 
harbor at 2:25 a. m. on October 18, while the 
Matson carrier dropped her cable off the Barge 
Office at 3 o'clock. 

Captain J. S. Macdonald of the Associated Oil 
Company's tanker J. A. Chanslor will soon go 
East to bring out a new tanker, sister-ship of the 
Chanslor. The new vessel will be named after W. 
F. Herrin, the well-known attorney. The Herrin 
will be similar to the Chanslor, which is the most 
modern oil carrier on the Pacific. 

The Board of Public Works of Los .\ngeles 
has awarded a $5000 contract to the Pacific 
Creosoting Company for piles for the first munici- 
pal wharf to be built at Wilmington. Bids have 
been advertised for dredging a twenty-five-font 
channel from the turning basin to the new wharf 
and for building the wharf and railroad track. 

Foreign owners are continuing to purchase 
British sailing vessels. Recent sales reported in- 
clude two vessels well known on the Coast, the 
British bark Procyon and the British bark Haw- 
thornbank. The former was bought by a firm in 
b'inland for $21,250. The Procyon is one of the 
largest three-masted sailing vessels afloat. 

President Green of the Puget Sound Naviga- 
tion Company, of Tacoma, announced on Octo- 
ber 20 that a contract for the new steel express 
steamer Tacoma will be awarded by November 1, 
if Tacoma votes on October 29 in favor of the 
municipal dock. The contract will probably go 
to the Union Iron Works, San Francisco. 

Captain Illa<]uer of the French bark Rogatine, 
which arrived at San Francisco on October 11 
from Newcastle, Australia, with a cargo of coal, 
reported that he discovered a shoal with only 
seventeen fathoms of water to the west of the 
island of St. Louis. Captain Illaquer said that 
he could find no markings on the chart for the 
shoal. 

.\s an experiment the United States Fish Com- 
mission will send to Seattle 2000 lobsters, to be 
planted in the Pacific Ocean. A refrigerator car 
will be used for the journey of 3000 miles, and it 
will be kept the same temperature throughout 
the trip if possible. By this means, it is expected, 
the lobsters will be kept alive without being put 
into water. 

The Union Iron Works has been engaged to 
float the British steamer Damara, stranded on 
the rocks off Fort Point, San Francisco, and the 
prospects now are that the vessel will be shifted 
from her position into deep water. When it was 
seen that the work of half a dozen tugs was un- 
.ivailing, it was decided to try the method of 
using anchors to get the vessel off. 

The Customs receipts for San Pedro for the 
three months ending October were $201,800, a 
gain of $118,204 over the same period last year. 
Receipts for September were over half the total 
on account of there being more foreign ships 
than usual. The biggest item of import was steel 
from .'\ntwerp, next came ties and oak logs from 
Japan. 

The American-Hawaiian freighter Nevadan is 
at Hunter's Point, San Francisco, drydock. Re- 
pairs to her port tail shaft will amount to more 
than $10,000. It has been ascertained that only 
about thirty sacks of grain in the No. 3 hold were 
damaged. This was- reached by water which 
seeped through the drain pipes from the after 
peak. 

Alfred Krogh, of Tacoma, is establishing a fac- 
tory at that port for the manufacture of life-sav- 
ing apparatus. During a recent visit to his old 
home in Denmark, Krogh obtained patent rights 
for tlie United States for the new apparatus, 
which is proving remarkably effective in Den- 
mark. Belts weighing two pounds, he claims, 
have proved more useful than the old-style belts 
weighing eight pounds. 

The steam-schooner Bowdoin, Captain Tib- 
bitts, arrived at San Francisco on October 19, 
sixty-three hours from Hueneme, reporting that 
she had been comiielled to leave the barkentine 
Retriever, which slie had in tow. On the 17th, 
nine miles northwest of Point Arguello, the haw- 
ser ])arted in a strong northwest gale and north- 
west swell. The sailing vessel got canvas up and 
was making good weather by herself. 

News of the seizure of several Japanese sealing 
schooners for poaching by the Russian authorities 
near Copper Island has been received. The 
cruiser Manjour captured the Japanese schooner 
Kano Maru engaged in poaching at the Copper 
Island rookery. The vessel was confiscated and 
taken to Petropavlovsk and the crew were taken 
off and sent to Vladivostok for punishment. 
Thirty-five scaling schooners left Japan this year 
and three were seized. 



F. R. \V.'\LL. who was for many years an oflS- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
n^arine l.ivv in San Francisco. He gives claims of 
all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, California St., near 
Montgomery. Telephones, Kearny 394; Home, 
C 3832. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
OF AMERICA. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR. 



WM. H. FRAZIER, Secretary -Treasurer, 

1% Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 



AFFILIATED UNIONS. 
ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass., 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
rORTLAND, Me., 377A Fore St. 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 51 South St. 
PHILAnELPHIA, Pa.. 206 Moravian St. 
RAL'l-IMORE. Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 221 Water St. 
MOBILE. Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumalne St. 



MARINE FIREMEN'S, OILERS' AND WATER 

TENDERS' UNION OF THE ATLANTIC 

AND GULF DISTRICT. 

Headquarters: 

NEW YORK, N. Y., 28 South St. 

Branches: 
BOSTON. Mass., 284 Commercial St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 252 Second St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 
NORFOLK, Va., 228 Water St. 
MOBILE. Ala., 4 Conti St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 514 Dumalne St. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK. N. Y., 42 South St. 

Branch: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 502 East Pratt St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION OF NEW YORK 
AND VICINITY. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK, N. Y., 214 West St. 



INLAND SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
WHITEHALL, N. Y. 



LAKE DISTRICT. 
LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 674 West Madison St. 

Branches: 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 

Agencies: 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St., E^st. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 Third St. 
BAY CITY. Mich.. 108 Fifth Ave. 
KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96), King St. 
ERIE, Pa., 328 German St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III., 113 92nd St. 
SANDUSKY, O., 510 Meigs St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St., N. W. 
CHICAGO. 111., 316 W. Kinzie St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St. 
MILWAUKEE, "Uis., 157 Reed St. 
ASHTABULA, O., 85 Bridge St. 
CONNEAUT, O., 995 Day St. 
TOLEDO, O., Cherry and Summit Sts. 
WEST SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 83 Ninety-second St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 8 Judson St. 
BAY CITY, Mich.. 208 Eraser St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 823 R. 

Branches: 
DETROIT, Mich., 33 .Jefferson St. 
TOLEDO, O., 1702 Summit St. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y., 154 Main St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 94 Hamilton St. 
B.A.Y CITY, Mich., 919 Water St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 74 Bridge St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 929 Superior Ave. 
CHICAGO, 111., 242 South Water St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 317 Virginia St. 

Sub-Agency: 
CONNEAUT, O., 891 Day St. 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



WALTER MACARTHUR '. Editor 

I'AUL SCHARREXBERG Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 
One year, by mail - 12.00 | Six months 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



$1.00 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To Insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 

Headijuarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
44-46 E.ist Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the .TOl'RN.AL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the p.nper. and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The .JOl'RNAI, is not responsible tor 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 26. 1910. 



THF. TLME.S IX\'ESTIGATION, 



The investigation into the causes of the 
Times explosion has thus far produced httle 
of a tangible nature. It is becoming appar- 
ent, however, that nr.thing will be left undone 
to attach responsibility, justly or otherwise, 
to some one. "John Doe" warrants have been 
issued in Los Angeles, under whicli it is pro- 
posed, from all accounts, to arrest several of- 
ficials of the labor movement in San Fran- 
cisco, take them to Los Angeles and, if possi- 
ble, hold them upon the ground of complicity 
in the crime. This course demonstrates the 
utter failure of the authorities in the search 
for the real offenders. To be sure, the arrest 
of the union officials will serve the purpose 
of discrediting the labor movement in the eyes 
of unthinking persons. This, in it.self, is an 
object which the union-haters of the southern 
city would not stop at, even though it involved 
the hanging of a dozen innocent men. 

Fortunately, there is little danger of serious 
results from the desperate tactics of Otis and 
his hirelings. While the innocent are being 
pursued the guilty are likely to escape. Otis 
probably cares little for this; his sole object 
is to gain sympathy for himself and to work 
his spite on the labor movement. This laud- 
able pur])Ose accomplished, the arrest or es- 
cape of the guilty persons is a matter of sec- 
ondary importance. Speaking advisedly, we 
believe that Otis would prefer that the guilty 
persons should escape, rather than that he 
should l)e de])rivecl of a pretext, however 
gauzy, for casting suspicion on the labor 
movement. 

It is interesting to note the attitude of the 
press and labor officials on the subject. For 
instance, the New York Commercial says: 

It is ill no sense unfair to organized labor to 
assume that the printing trades-unions or indi- 
vidual members of them ijo Los .Xngeles were 
directly responsible for the blowing up of The 
Times building and plant with dynamite, the 
murder of nineteen of its employes, and the seri- 
ous injury of twenty-five more — because these 
unions and their allies have for years been threat- 
ening to destroy this non-union outfit and, if 
])Ossiblc, the puldicntion itself so as to weaken the 
forces tliat are fighting union policies and prac- 
tices 

California is uiiion-labor-ridden and ought to 



rid herself of the curse. A few hangings for 
union-labor crimes will alone restore normal in- 
dustrial conditions out there. 

The Comnicrciars views would be more val- 
uable if they were based upon the truth. It 
need hardly be said that that i)aper is entirely 
in error in saying that "these unions and their 
allies have for years been threatening to de- 
stroy this non-union outfit and, if possible, 
the publication itself." Nothing in the history 
of the relations between the Times and the 
labor movement can be considered as in the 
sligiitcst degree justifying the charges of the 
Commercial. 

Samuel Gomi)crs, President of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor, when interviewed 
cc^nccrning the Times explosion, said : 

The position of The Times toward union labor 
is well known, but nothing has happened recently 
to make the feeling of union men against the 
paper more acute. T r"gret the loss of life and 
destruction of property, but I see no reason for 
thinking union members had anything to do 
with it. 

James ^L Lynch, President of the- Interna- 
tional Typographical Union, has expressed 
himself as follows : 

The Los Angeles Times has for many years 
been a bitter, unrelenting, and unreasoning enemy 
of trade-unionism anrl it is characteristic of The 
Times management that immediately after the 
explosion which wrecked its plant and without 
awaiting anj^ investigation as to the cause of the 
catastrophe it should charge the disaster to the 
trade-unions as was done by The Times' assistant 
general manager. The Typographical Union re- 
sents and refutes this charge. We have defended 
ourselves against the attacks made by The Times 
as best we could, but we have always fought fair. 

The International Typographical Union is not 
a law-breaking, dynamiting institution; its record 
of more than sixty years' existence is an honor- 
able one and entirely free from resort to violence 
of any kind. It has won its cause and reached 
its present position of strength and influence 
solely through the justice of its contentions and 
the lawful and orderly manner in which its aims 
have been prosecuted and made effective. 

The W^ashington .Star, in common with 

many other news])apers, is disposed to be fair 

in treating of tlie possible connection of the 

labor movement with the disaster. The Star 

says: 

The Los .Angeles outrages — for all three cases 
must be considered together, the destruction of 
The Times building and the attempts upon the 
two dwellings — were possibly committed by men 
inspired by a fanatical zeal for what they con- 
ceived to be a just cause, carried off their balance 
by long brooding over either personal rnisfor- 
tunes or the failure of their organizations to win 
in the fight for recognition. If this is the case 
it is even more to the interest of the organizations 
themselves to find these miscreants and secure 
tluir punishment than it is for that of the com- 
nuinity and. the publishing company which has 
suffered this heavy loss. 

Writing in a similar vein, tiie P.oston Tran- 
script says : 

The labor-unions arc pursuing the proper 
course in assisting to trace this wholesale crime 
to its source. They can not afford to rest under 
the imputation or suspicion for which in the minds 
of many this shocking incident seems to furnish 
ground. They can not leave their future under 
the shadow of a great public crime and calamity. 
They must not permit to remain an impression 
that they are enemies of society and sharers in 
dastardly and deadly methods of adjusting griev- 
ances. The trouble in such cases is that there 
are stormy petrels of labor disturbances who 
make them the occasions for exploiting insane 
ideas and overworked passions. Among the ar- 
rests that have been made is that of a supposed 
anarchist. The anarchists care little or nothing 
for the interests of labor. They do not labor 
themselves and have little sympathy with those 
who do, but are willing to sacrifice them for their 
own insane purposes. Dynamite is their favorite 
means of attaining their ends. The Los Angeles 
affair was not so public as the Haymarket riots in 
Chicago, but it has similar earmarks. 

The Journal sees no reason to modify its 
attitude on the subject. We believe that when 
the truth becomes known it will be found that 
neither the labor movement nor any one con- 
nected with it has had anything to do with, 
or any knowledge of the plot (if plot there 
be) to destroy the Times. 



VIEWS ON LABOR BILLS. 



The California State Federation of Labor 
recently addressed the candidates for legisla- 
tive offices with the object of securing their 
views on the various labor bills pending in 
the Legislature and Congress. Among the 
replies received is the following, from Walter 
Macarthur, a candidate for Congress from 
the Fourth District of California : 

Mr. Paul Scharrcnberg, Secretary-Treasurer, Cali- 
fornia State Federation of Labor, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

Dear Sir: — 

(am in receipt of your favor of 18th ult., en- 
closing copies of certain bills now pending in 
Congress, and requesting a statement of my views 
tlureon. I take pleasure in complying with your 
re(|uest. 

Having read these bills with care, and having 
had considerable experience in the matters dealt 
with, I do not hesitate to declare my unqualified 
approval of the proposed legislation. If elected 
to Congress I shall make a special effort to secure 
the passage of these measures. 

I favor the passage of the so-called -Anti-In- 
junction bill as a necessity to the preservation of 
those popular institutions, free press, free speech, 
and peaceable assemblage, without which popular 
government can not exist. The present tendency 
of the courts in enjoining the exercise of these 
rights is a decided violation of the spirit and letter 
of the Constitution, and unless corrected by such 
legislation as is here proposed, must lead, first, to 
the subiection of labor to a state of helplessness, 
and. secondly, to the destruction of the principle 
of free government which guarantees all men 
equal rights and equal protection under the law. 
Our governmrnt is a "government by law." "Gov- 
ernment by Injunction" is government by men, 
i. e.. by judges. Judges are but human, and there- 
fore likely to err. Judges and courts while ad- 
ministering the law must themselves respect the 
law. The .Anti-Injunction bill, being designed to 
"regulate the issuance of injunctions" and to 
"limit the meaning of 'conspiracy,'" will, when 
enacted, serve as a guide to the courts and enable 
them to distinguish dearly between those cases 
which properly come within the purview of equity 
jiower, and those cases which, involving the exer- 
cise of personal rights, are clearly beyond the 
authority of courts to restrain. The bill in ques- 
tion will protect all classes of the people against 
infringement upon the rights reserved to them by 
the Constitution, and guarantee. to all alleged of- 
fenders against the law the full exercise of the 
provisions designed to insure fair trial. The bill 
ought, therefore, to be enacted at the earliest pos- 
sible moment. 

The passage of the Eight-Hour bill is necessary 
to insure proper enforcement of the law already 
on the statutes of the United States. As things 
stand, the operation of the National Eight-Hour 
law is limited to persons working directly for the 
Government. These constitute, in the aggregate, a 
small number, as compared with those employed 
by contractors for the Government. The pro- 
visions of the present law ought to be enlarged 
so as to require that all persons working for the 
Government, whether directly or under a Govern- 
inent contract, shall be entitled to the benefit of 
the Eight-Hour law. The exceptions made in the 
hill, so as to meet the emergencies of war, fire, 
or other disaster, are ample for the purpose in 
view. I therefore favor the passage of this bill 
at the earliest possible moment. 

The Prison Labor bill is designed to afford pro- 
tection to each State and Territory against the 
importation from other States or Territories of 
prison-made products. It is but right that each 
State should be permitted to tnake its own laws in 
the matter of regulating or prohibiting the sale of 
prison-made products, aoplicable to such products 
when imported from other localities. Otherwise, 
the laws of a given State become nugatory. Free 
labor ought to be protected against competition 
with prison labor. Lender the circumstances of 
prison labor, competition is in reality impossible. 
Whenever a given State determines to protect its 
own people from such competition at the hands of 
its own prisoners, it ought to be empowered, 
under the provisions of the bill here discussed, to 
protect itself against competition at the hands of 
prisoners in other States, by the application to 
the products of the latter of its own laws in the 
matter. I therefore favor the passage of this bill 
at the earliest possible moment. 

In conclusion, I thank you for the opportunity 
of stating my views upon these matters, and as- 
sure you that I shall regard it as a high privilege 
to co-operate with the organized workers of Cali- 
fornia in securing legislation so greatly needed for 
the protection and advancement of our people. 
Respectfully, 
(Signed) WALTER MACARTHUR. 

San Francisco, Oct. 17, 1910. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



LABOR'S DIFFERENCES WITH MARKS. 

(Continued from Page 2.) 



tice. But, sometimes it is necessary to shock the 
employing class, or even a whole community, so 
that they may come to understand that there is 
a social question up before the public, and that 
the working class intends that it sh;ill be solved. 
In the Philadelphia street-car dispute there was 
a civic question of magnitude. The working peo- 
ple were being made the mere pawns of corrupt 
employers and city officials. Where was Mr. 
Marks' "public" then? What did its precious 
"opinion" amount to? How did business morality 
measure up with the needs of that community? 
The working classes were moved by a spirit of 
disgust and revolt, and their act found recom- 
pense in its expression. 

(6) We reprint this paragraph of Mr. Marks', 
so that there may be no possibility of misquota- 
tion: 

"Sixth. Compensation for Accidents. — Em- 
ployers agree that the present system of liability 
insurance is unjust and ineffective. Many favor 
the new thought of prompt and direct compen- 
sation for accidents; but if they are to be re- 
sponsible for injuries resulting from negligence 
of employes they will insist on full liberty in 
the selection and discharge of help, which liberty 
is not allowed in the closed shop." 

This is by far the most important announce- 
ment in Mr. Marks' entire article. If he has 
been authorized by any body of employers to 
put forth such declaration, it means that the work- 
ing classes of the United States are to be forced 
by anti-trade unionists to enter upon a long and 
hard campaign in order to get a compensation act 
such as obtains in Great Britain. No such stipu- 
lation as Mr. Marks proposes has been found 
necessary in other countries. It is a most un- 
fortunate thing that Mr. Marks should spring this 
threat — for such it is — at this stage of the move- 
ment for compensation. It is plainly an attempt 
to use the proposed act as a club to weaken trade 
unionism. 

Conciliation. — Round-table, or any other, con- 
ferences between representatives of employers 
and representatives of employes occur only when 
the employes are organized, or, in a very few 
cases, when employers in fear of the trade unions 
recognize their own employes as a body. The 
saving quality of industrial conferences is in the 
force of the trade union. When there is no un- 
ion, employers "dictate," and "there's an end 
on't." When there is a union, two sides measure 
strength. Both being satisfied that the better 
course is to settle rather than to fight, confer- 
ences ensue. 

As to Mr. Marks' State investigation boards, 
we have but this to say. They have in them the 
germ which leads to involuntary servitude. In 
the few communities where such boards have been 
established, the provisions are contained which 
compel men to toil under conditions which are 
onerous to them, and when such a condition ob- 
tains, when men are forced to labor against their 
will even for one day, ave. for one hour, sbvery 
has been established. The Constitution of the 
United States guarantees that no man shall_ be 
kept in involuntary servitude except as a punish- 
ment for crime. .Any attempt to tie men to their 
work against their will is repugnant not only to 
that provision of the Constitution, but is at va- 
riance with every concept of liberty and progress. 

Trade unionists are not averse to their side of 
any controversy with employers being known to 
the world. Tnd'eed, the establishment of the labor 
press where labor's side of any labor controversy 
is published, is the result of newspaper suppres- 
sion of perversion of the facts in disputes between 
employers and workers. There is a common con- 
cert of action generally in the newspaper press 
of the country to suppress or pervert the laborer's 
side of the labor question. 

Happily, we have safely p.nssed through the pe- 
riod when compulsory arbitration was proposed 
to the workers and employers of the United 
States, and now there is unanimity of opinion 
against the project. When that panacea for all 
our industrial ills was proposed some twelve years 
ago, it was our pleasurable duty to first attack it; 
this in spite of ridicule and relentless misrepre- 
sentation. We have taken our position upon 
these compulsory governmental investigations 
and attempts to legally tie men to their toil. Mr. 
Marks will live to negative the position on com- 
pulsory governmental investigation as he has 
lived to change his position on compulsory arbi- 
tration. 

.Ml citizens of the United States are to keep 
these facts in mind in framing up methods for 
the settlement of differences in the labor market: 
First, no law in this country can compel a man 
out of prison to work; secondly, no sort of arbi- 
tr.ntion or other board can be devised that wdl be 
allowed to take awav from the workers the ad- 
vantage they derive from their trade union activ- 
ities. 

Hieher wages, a shorter workday, unproved 
conditions of employment, better homes and 
workshops, more sanitary surroundings and safe- 
ty appliances; the children taken out of the mills, 
mines, and workshops and placed in the schools 
and plavgrounds: more manhood, character, and 
independence instilled in the workers; brighter 
hopes and higher aspirations for the toilers, their 
wives and children— these are some of the 
achievements of the organized labor movement, 



and they are not going to be surrendered by the 
sophistry or special pleadings of Mr. Marcus 
Marks or others who would act upon his theories, 
but who have not given verbal expression to 
them. Mr. Marks, think of the past condition of 
labor before the era of organization and look 
around you now. Won't you agree that the fu- 
ture is ours? — Samuel Gompers, in .American Fed- 
erationist. 



SEAMAN ENTITLED TO TREATMENT. 



United States District Court, Western District 
of Washington, Northern Division. 

Rudolph Rylander vs. Steamship St. Helens, 
etc. 

Memorandum decision on exceptions to the 
libel. M 

The libelant alleges that while he was working 
as a member of the crew of the steamship .St. 
Helens, he suffered an injury attributable to negli- 
gence on the part of the mate, who was in charge 
of the work, and other members of the crew. 

By the maritime law in cases of injury to a 
mariner in the service of a ship, negligence is 
not a material fact to be considered unless there 
be gross iie,gligence on the part of the injured, 
which should bar him from the enjoyment of a 
mariner's rights to maintenance and medical and 
surgical treatment at the expense of the ship, and 
wages without diminution on account of his dis- 
ability to work. He is entitled to these benefits 
without assuming the burden of proving that his 
injury happened as a consequence of negli,gcnce 
on the part of others, and notwithstanding con- 
tributory negligence on his own part, not amount- 
ing to gross negligence or wilful misconduct. The 
Governor .\mes. 55 Fed. Rep., 327; The Troop, 
118 Fed. Rep., 769, s. c. 128 Fed. Rep. 855. 

One of the four propositions declared to be 
settled in law in this country by the decision of 
the Supreme Court in the case of tlie Osceola, 
189 U. S., 158, is: 

"That the seaman is not allowed to recover an 
indemnity for the neglect of the master, or any 
member of the crew, but is entitled to main- 
tenance and cure, whether the injuries were re- 
ceived by negligence or accident." 

I have considered whether this suit can be 
maintained by virtue of the recent legislation by 
Congress relating to the liability of carriers en- 
gaged in interstate commerce to employes injured 
in their service. The .Act of June 11, 1906, M U. 
S. Stat., 232, Pierce Fed. Code, Sec. 7942, in broad 
and comprehensive terms fixed the liability of all 
carriers operating in the District of Columbia, 
and the Territories, and engaged in interstate and 
foreign commerce. That statute, however, has 
been declared to l)e unconstitutional and void by 
the Supreme Court in the Emplovers' Liabilitv 
Cases, 207, U. S., 463. In the latte'r Act of 1908. 
35 U. S. Stat., 65; Pierce's Fed. Code, Sec. 1271, by 
its terms applies only to common carriers by rail- 
road. Therefore, it has no effect to change the 
maritime law. The 8th section of the Act is am- 
bi.guous and hard to understand, but it would be 
contrary to all rules for the interpretation of 
statutes, to give efifect to it by creating a right or 
obligation. 

The exceptions to the libel will be overruled, 
but the case will be entertained for further con- 
sideration only for the purpose of determining the 
amount which the libelant may be entitled to re- 
cover, if anything, for his expense of maintenance 
and cure. HANFORD, Judge. 



JAPANESE TRADE NOTES. 



In 1909 Japan exported cartlienwarc and 
porcelain to the value of $2,618,400, and of 
this the United States took $1,442,841. 

Japanese "soy" is exported chiefly to the 
United States, Hawaii, Port Arthur and 
Dahiy, and Korea, each taking approximate- 
ly -H30,000 gallons annually. 

Japan exported nearly $500,000 worth of 
toys in 1909, the United States taking $187,- 
670 worth, England $68,213, China $38,187, 
P.ritish India $30,871, and Germany $29,023. 

During 1909 Great Britain bought 447,- 
526 square yards of Japanese carpets out of 
a total of 623,692 yards exported, but in 
matting the United States takes practically 
all of Japan's output. 

Australia and the United States demand 
nearly all of Japan's sulphur output, the for- 
mer taking 35,421,604 pounds and the latter 
37,450.515 pounds in 1909. Switzerland 
takes about 500,000 pounds monthly. 

For each member of the population of the 
United States about one-third of a pound 
of Japanese tea and 10 or 12 paper napkins 
are sold annually in America. Of Japan's 
total exports of peanuts the United States 
takes two-thirds. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



llead(|uarters, San Francisco, Oct. 24, 1910. 
Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7:30 p. m., Paul Seharrcnberg presiding. Secre- 
tary reported shipping dull. Balloting for dele- 
gates to the convention of the International Sea- 
men's Union of .America was concluded. 

A. FURUSETH, Secretary. 
44-46 East St. Pacific Phone Kearny 2228. 
Home Phone J 2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 17, 1910. 
Shipping fair. 

JOHN PEARSON, Agent. 
122 Alexander St. P. O. Box 1365. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 17, 1910. 
Shipping rather dull in sailing vessels, fair in 
steam-schooners; prospects uncertain. 

H. T.. PETTFRSON, Agent. 
2218 North .Wth St. Tel. Main 808. 

Seattle Agency, Oct. 17, 1910. 
Shipping and jn'ospects poor. 

P. B. GTUL, Agent. 
1312 Western Ave. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 
4403. 



Port Townsend Agency, Oct. 17, 1910. 
No meetin.g; no quorum. Shipping and pros- 
pects poor. 

WAT.TFR MOLLFR. Asrent. 
229'/^ Water St. P. O. Box 48. Tel. 141 J. 

Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 17, 1910. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

HARRY COOK, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. 22.5. 



Portland. Ore., Agency, Oct. 17, 1910. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

D. W, PAUL, Agent. 
51 Union Ave. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 17, 1910. 
No meeting: no quorum. Shipping slack; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

TOHN W. ERTCKSEN. Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 327. Tel. Main 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 17. 1910. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 67. Tel. Main 662 



Honolulu Agency, Oct. 10, 1910. 
Shipping and prospects poor; quite a few mem- 
bers ashore. 

CHAS. SORENSEN, A.gent. 
P O. Box 314. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 20. 1910. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping slack. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, October 23, 1910. 
No meeting. Shipping medium. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
P. O. Box 1335. 



Sail Pedro Agency, Oct. 19, 1910. 
Shipping medium, prospects fair; few men 
ashore. 

ED. BARRY, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



Hcad(iuarters, Chicago, Oct. 17, 1910. 
.Situation unchanged. 

ALEX. McKECHNIE, Scc'y pro tern. 
674 West Madison St. 



ATLANTIC COAST SEAMEN'S UNION. 



llead'inarlers, Boston, Mass.. Oct. 18, 1910. 
Shipi^ing fair. 

. WM. II. ERAZJER, Secretary. 
]l/?\ Lewis .Street. 



DIED. 

Chas. Berg, No. 981, a native of Sweden, aged 
43, died at San Pedro, Cal., on Oct. 23, 1910. 

Alex Jessamine, No. 228, a native of New York, 
aged 56. died on the schooner Alpena, at sea, 
(in Oct 20, 1910 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SINKING OF CARFERRY 18. 



"It is our opinion that the master of Pere 
Marquette No. 18 displayed very poor judg- 
ment in holding the crew aboard the boat as 
long as he did. As much as two hours be- 
fore the vessel sank, we feel that his knowl- 
edge and ability as a seaman must have 
told him that his ship was in a very preca- 
rious condition, and that it was dangerous to 
be aboard her. We think that his efforts 
were directed more towards saving the ship 
than to the saving of the lives aboard his 
boat." 

In these words embodied in the report of 
their investigation of the loss of the carferry 
and twenty-eight lives, Captain Frank W. 
Van Patten and William A. Collins, United 
States local inspectors of steam vessels at 
Milwaukee, express censure of the conduct 
of Captain Peter Kilty, master of the vessel. 
The report received by George Uhler, Uni- 
ted States Supervising Inspector General, 
Washington, also expressed regret that the 
local inspectors feel called upon to criticize 
the judgment of one who is dead and unable 
to present any defense. 

As has been stated, the report of the local 
inspectors admits their inability to fix the 
cause of the wreck. 

"We are of the opinion," says the report, 
"that the breaking of three deadlights on 
the port side, undoubtedly put the finishing 
touch to the vessel, but as to how the water 
first got into the after compartment and why 
it was not pumped out, wc are unable to 
ascertain, inasmuch as all the officers of the 
ship who had the actual working of the ship 
in charge are dead. 

"We are confident the large amount of 
water found in the after compartment by 
the oiler at 3 a. m., never could have leaked 
in through the defective deadlight on the 
starboard side. From all evidence we could 
get relative to this deadlight, the amount of 
water it leaked could not have filled the after 
compartment, and any pump aboard the boat 
would more than take care of this leakage. 

"From the evidence submitted, we find 
there were at least two other ways whereby 
water could get into the after compartment, 
without the occupants of the flicker knowing 
it. One was through the sea cock for filling 
the compartment, which may have been left 
open, and the other would be through the 
eighteen-inch deck scuttles. The sea might 
have washed off a scuttle cover and the com- 
partment have been filled in this way. 

"It is an assured fact, however, that the 
whole after compartment was full of water 
at the time the vessel sank. 

"What it was that destroyed the balance 
of the vessel we cannot say definitely. It 
may have been the giving away of a bulk- 
head, allowing the water to flow into the 
engine compartment, or it may be that the 
cars on the deck forward, became unfastened 
and ran to the after part of the ship. We 
have evidence from one man who started 
to go to the car deck from the forward part 
of the boat, and he testifies there was not a 
car on the deck." 



For fair products of all kinds patronize 
the Journal's advertisers. 



NEW CARFERRY NO. 2. 



The new Marquette and Bessemer carfer- 
ry No. 2, which is to replace the Pere Mar- 
quette No. 15, arrived in this port from 
Cleveland on her maiden trip last night. The 
officers in charge, who are Conneaut men, 
are Captain Rowan, Chief Engineer Buchan- 
an and First Mate .Andy Read. 

The new carferry is almost a duplicate of 
the one which was lost last December. A 
coincidence in connection with the two fer- 
ries is the fact that it was just five years 
ago to-day that the late Captain R. R. Mc- 
Leod, of the lost craft, went to Cleveland 
and brought the ill-fated No. 2 to this port. 

The new carferry No. 2 is manned 
throughout with scabs from the Lake Car- 
riers' Association. 

The body of Captain R. R. McLeod, who 
was lost with No. 2 carferry last December, 
has been recovered, and was buried with 
high honors at Conneaut on October 9. Cap- 
tain IMcLeod had many friends, and no bet- 
ter man ever .sailed the Lakes. He was a 
man, and no higher compliment can be of- 
fered him. 

W. H. Jenkins. 

Conneaut, O. 



NO THANKS CALLED FOR. 



The little steamer New York was lost in 
Lake Huron recently. Her crew took to the 
boats when ail hope of saving their vessel 
was gone, and the boats were picked up by 
the Steel Trust steamer Mataafa and the 
barge Ilalley. Now the Detroit Free Press 
goes into ecstacies of hero-worship over 
Captain Reagan and the crew of the Ma- 
taafa, because they slowed down and al- 
lowed the yawls of the New York to come 
alongside. 

Such maudlin stufT is sickening. The 
crew of the Mataafa were never in any more 
danger than they would have been on dry 
land. They did nothing toward a rescue, 
except dump a barrel of oil over the side. 
The chances are 100 to 1 that there were not 
five men aboard who could pull an oar in a 
seaway. It is not my intention or wish to 
detract from or belittle Captain Reagan's 
act in standing by, but I do not see why 
the crew "deserves the thanks of every sea- 
man on the Lakes." 



PLANS FOR NEW BOAT. 



Plans have practically been completed by 
Designer Frank E. Kirby for the new $300,- 
000 passenger steamer to operate between 
Put-in-Bay and Detroit in connection with 
the Ashley & Dustin line. 

It is probable the specifications will be 
opened for bids some time this week or next, 
after which the work on the construction of 
the vessel will start at once. It is to be 
stipulated that the boat be finished in time 
to allow her owners to place her in com- 
mission on the route next season. 



NOTICE TO MASTERS. 



Buffalo Breakwater shoal buoy No. 4, a 
three-class spar, reported missing September 
24, will be replaced as soon as practicable. 



BLAMED FOR COLLISION. 



The entire blame for the collision of the 
steamer John W. IMoore, which was sunk 
with the loss of one life in the lower De- 
troit River, opposite Wyandotte, October 
30, 1907, is placed on the steamer E. Y. 
Townsend of Detroit, in an opinion by Judge 
Arthur S. Denison, before whom the case, 
involving three libels, was tried May 3 last. 

Three vessels were concerned. The Town- 
send, bound up light, was attempting to pass 
to the starboard of the Moore, also bound 
up with coal, when they met the steamer 
Queen City, ore laden, coming down. As 
the Moore and Queen City drew together for 
a port to port passage the Moore took a 
sheer into the Queen City's course and was 
rammed on her starboard bow, forward of 
per pilot house. 

The owners of the Moore brought action 
against the Townsend for $76,635.70, con- 
tending the collision resulted from suction 
created by the Townsend passing too near 
the Moore. 

The owners of the Queen City libeled both 
the other steamers on a claim of $27,577.74 
and Mrs. Jerraimy Mclntyre, widow of the 
man killed, filed a libel for $20,000 against 
all three. 

Judge Denison holds that the collision was 
the direct and natural result of the Town- 
send's failure to maintain a safe distance 
under conditions that she should have an- 
ticipated. 

The steamer Townsend is owned by the 
Cambria Steamship Company and is oper- 
ated by M. A. Hanna & Co. The steamer 
J. W. Moore is owned by F. M. Osborne and 
the Queen City is one of the steamers of the 
Steel Trust fleet. 



Captain James David.son, of Bay City, is 
planning to send the steamer Honduras to 
the Coast this fall. The steamer, which has 
been at Cleveland for a week, has been fitted 
out for salt water service. She will load coal 
at Cleveland for Duluth and if the deal is 
closed she will take a cargo of grain at the 
Head of the Lakes for Montreal. The 
steamer will load lumber near the latter 
port for New York. She has capacity for 
about 1,500,000 feet. 

Captain Davidson said that he had sev- 
eral oflFers for the boat on the Coast and that 
it w-as almost a sure thing that the Hon- 
duras would be operated on the Atlantic 
during the winter. 

"Many of the Lake vessels are idle," said 
Captain Davidson recently, "and more of 
the wild carriers will have to go to the dock 
before the close of the season. The Hon- 
duras is now ready for salt water service 
and I think she will do well in that trade. 
The steamer's carrying capacity is 3000 gross 
tons. She is 243 feet keel, 43 feet beam 
and 26 feet deep." 



.According to a dispatch received from 
Marquette, the United States local inspect- 
ors at that port have suspended for twenty 
days the licenses of Captain A. R. Thomp- 
son, of the steamer Zenith City, and Duncan 
Mclntyre, first mate. This was owing to 
the grounding of the steamer some weeks 
ago. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



TO SAFEGUARD CARFERRIES. 



Captain C. H. Westcott, United States 
Supervising Inspector of Steam Vessels in 
the eighth district, is authority for the an- 
nouncement that the railroad companies 
operating carferries in translake traffic are 
arranging to have tightly fitting hoods 
placed on the hitherto open sterns of their 
boats. This action is traceable to the re- 
cent loss of Pere Marquette No. 18 with 
twenty-eight lives and is regarded as being 
prompted by a desire on the part of the 
owners to safeguard what might be consid- 
ered a weak point. 

Other modifications of carferry construc- 
tion, calculated to increase their powers of 
resistance to sea and weather, will be urged 
before the United States board of supervis- 
ing inspectors of steam vessels at the next 
meeting of that body. 

"Although the loss of Pere Marquette 
No. 18, which was regarded as one of the 
finest car boats ever built, does not, in it- 
self, indicate any defect in construction or 
reflect discredit on shipbuilders or the steam- 
boat inspection service, I believe some 
changes should be made in the plan on 
which these boats are built," says Captain 
C. H. AVestcott. 

"In addition to the closely fitting hood, 
on the stern, I shall advocate the closing of 
all deadlights on the under side of the vessel, 
either by eliminating these openings alto- 
gether, or by placing over them a covering 
which shall extend to the height of the 
upper deck, the top being left open for ven- 
tilation. If deadlights on the outside are 
done away with, they could be replaced by 
an artificial system of ventilation in the hold 
of the steamer or by ventilator holes through 
the middle of the longitudinal section of the 
main deck, placed in line with the smoke- 
stacks and equipped with a covering the top 
of which shall 1)e at least as high as the 
upper deck level." 



NOTICE TO MARINERS. 



Announcement is made by the Depart- 
ment of Marine and Fisheries of Canada 
that a breakwater extension is being built 
to the west pier at the entrance to Rondeau 
harbor, Lake Erie, southward of and in the 
line of the existing pier; and mariners are 
now warned of this fact that the cribs sunk 
in place may not prove dangerous to navi- 
gation. 

The outer end of the submerged cribwork 
of the extension to the west pier is distant 
1010 feet from the south end of the old por- 
tion of the pier, and is marked at night by 
a light maintained by the contractor, but in 
stormy weather this light cannot be de- 
pended on. 

A light has been established on the beacon 
on the south end of Sister rock, Wabuno 
channel, Georgian Bay. Bearings: Lati- 
tude N. 4.S degrees 14 minutes 19 seconds ; 
longitude W. 80 degrees 13 minutes 10 sec- 
onds. The light is a fixed white light, shown 
from a lens lantern, is elevated thirty-five 
feet above the water, and should be visible 
eleven miles from all points of approach. 
The illuminant is acetylene. The light is 
unwatched. The lantern stands on top of 
the beacon. The beacon is a white slatted 
structure surmounted by a red triangle, and 
is thirty-two feet high. 



STRIKE 

ON THE GREAT LAKES 

COMRADES: 

The strike of Sailors, Firemen and Cooks 
on the Great Lakes is still on. We appeal 
to all seafaring men to assist us in persuad- 
ing seamen to stay away from the Lakes 
during this strike. 

Any reports that the strike has been set- 
tled are false. 

The Seamen of the Great Lakes are sticking to- 
gether solidly, and will keep up the battle for 
freedom and decent conditions until the fight is 
won. "God Almighty hates a quitter." (So do 
we.) 

Lend a hand, comrades, by inducing seamen to 
stay away from the Lakes while the strike is on. 
Yours fraternally, 

LAKE DISTRICT, 
International Seamen's Union of America. 

STRIKE ON THE GREAT LAKES 
KEEP AWAY! 



LEAP FROM BURNING BOAT. 



The cabin was burned ofif and the stern 
of the steamer United Lumberman severely 
damaged by fire at North Tonawanda short- 
ly before 2 o'clock on the morning of Sep- 
tember 25, entailing a loss of at least $5,000. 

The fire spread so rapidly that nine of 
the twelve persons aboard the vessel were 
forced to jump into Niagara River in their 
night clothes. Captain Thomas Padington's 
wife attempted to reach shore by crawling 
hand over hand along a hawser attached to 
the stern of the boat. She fell into the 
water after going part way, being forced to 
do so on account of the intense heat of the 
flames to which she was exposed. She 
was rescued by her husband. Two other 
members of the crew were so burned that 
they had to be attended by a physician. 

The steamer, owned by Norden & Co., 
Oakville, Ont., unloaded a cargo of white 
pine at North Tonawanda. 



STEAMER HANNA RELEASED. 



The Reid Wrecking Company's tugs Sar- 
nia City and Winslow succeeded in releasing 
the steamer Hanna from the Middle Ground, 
Port Huron, on September 25, after lighter- 
ing about 300 tons. The vessel was towed 
to the Reid company's drydock, where tem- 
porary repairs will be made before proceed- 
ing up the Lake. 

The damage on the steamer Brown is very 
much larger than first reported, her decks 
amidship, where she hit the Hanna, are very 
badly buckled and the damage runs across 
to the port side. Some of the hull plates on 
the port side were pushed outward by the 
force of the collision. 

Captain Tuttlc, insurance representative 
of Cleveland, is looking after her and she 
will probably be taken to Detroit for repairs. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



In order that she will be immediately 
available on Lake Michigan al-ter her com- 
pletion in January next, it has been deter- 
mined to build the new F. & P. M. carferry 
at South Chicago. 



Charles Bourroughs, No. 2745, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by his father. 

Findlay J. McDonald, No. 5499, Lake Sea- 
men's Union, is inquired for by John D. Mc- 
Donald, Highland Park, Mich. 

Comrade Henry Blaschke. Any one 
knowing the above-named comrade please 

communicate with Jno. Rook, Jr., 2564 E. 
55th St., Cleveland. 

Roy Person, No. 12522, L. S. U., is in- 
quired for by his sister. Miss Hazel Person, 
225 Chisholm street, Alpena, Mich. 

John P. Doer, No. 559, is inquired for by 
his sister, Airs. F. J. Lingemann, 435 Alfred 
street, Detroit, Mich. 



LIGHTS ESTABLISHED. 



Announcement is made by the United 
States Bureau of Lighthouses, Washington, 
that Pt. Aux Barques gas and whistling 
buoy No. 1 will be established this week in 
about thirty feet of water about one-half 
mile east of the easterly edge of the rocky 
reef extending ofif shore at Pt. Aux Barques, 
Lake Huron. The buoy will show a red 
light during periods of ten seconds dura- 
tion, the whistle sounding by motion of the 
sea. Bearings : 

Port Hope docks, outer end 158 degrees 
45 minutes true (S by E 5-8 E mag.) Pt. 
Aux Barques lighthouse 252 degrees 50 min- 
utes true (WSW 3-4 mag.) Huron City 
dock, outer end 278 degrees 15 minutes true 
(W by N 15-16 W mag.) The Pt. Aux 
Barques reef bell buoy. No. 1, heretofore 
marking this reef at a point about one mile 
south, will be discontinued. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Jf)URNAr.'s ad columns. 



LAKE SEAMEN'S DIRECTORY. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

(Lake District International Seamen's 

Union of America.) 

674 West Madison Street, Chicago, III. 

Telepiione, 1321 Monroe. 

BRANCHES: 

IWILWAUKEE. Wis 133 Ciinton Street 

Teieplione 240 South. 

BUFFALO. N. Y 55 Main Street 

Teieplione 936 R. Seneca. 

ASHTABULA HARBOR, 21 High Street 

Telephone Bell 175 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1244 Main Ave., N. W. 

Telephone Bell West 351. 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 1890. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

AGENCIES: 

i:)ETROIT, Mich 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3742. 

SUPERIOR, Wis 1721 Third Street 

Telephone, New Phone, Broad 155 L. 

BAY CITY. Mich 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

KINGSTON, Ont., Canada (Box 96) King Street 

BIUP:, Pa 328 German Street 

Telephone Bell 599 F. 

CONNEAUT HARBOR. 922 Day Street 

Telephone Bell 83. 

.SOUTH CHICAGO. Ill 113 92nd Street 

'I'elephone 2853 South Chicago. 
SANDUSKY, 510 Meigs Street 



HOSPITAL AND RELIEF STATIONS. 

UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS. 

CHICAGO. ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND. O. 



RELIEF 
Ashlanrl. Wis. 
.\shtnl)Ula Harbor, O. 
Hijffalo. N. Y. 
Diihith. Minn. 
Esfanaha, Mich. 
Grand Haven. Mich. 
Grpen Bay, Mich. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 



STATIONS. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Maniuette. MIcli. 
Milwaukee. Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan. Mich. 
.Sturgeon Bay, Wis. 
Superior. Wla. 
Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



STRANGE LAKES OF MICHIGAN. 



Five thousand lakes of all sizes is the proud 
total claimed by the State of JMichigan. Some 
of them are mysterious bodies having neither 
inlet nor outlet, nor, so far as can be dis- 
covered by sounding, bottom. 

Many of the smaller lakes, according to the 
I'ur News, are slowly growing over and have 
wide margins of tough sod that will support 
the weight of a man, although merely resting 
on water or a thin mud of unknown depth. 

These margins tremble to the tread and 
quiver for many feet around when stepped 
upon. There are instances where a lake has 
become entirely overgrown and for so long a 
period that the surface becomes solid and the 
existence of water underneath is unsuspected. 

The Pere Man|uette Railroad Company, 
when building a branch between Grand Rapids 
and Lansing, returned to the work one morn- 
ing to find that several rods of roadbed had 
disapi)eared during the night and a consider- 
able lake had taken its place. Thousands of 
feet of timber and many carloads of earth 
were dumped in before bottom was found and 
the road had anything like a firm foundation. 
The pressure of the displaced water heaved the 
earth and cracked it for .some distance around, 
tilting large forest trees, some of which fell. 

\\'ater came up through these crevices, 
bringing eyeless fish, both bass and bullheads, 
convincing certain former skeptics that when 
any organ of sense or locomotion falls into dis- 
use it degenerates and is finally lost. Probably 
these fisii were the descendants of others that 
had lived in darkness for ages. 

A small lake in Bowne township, su])posed 
by the rural folk to be bottomless, swallowed 
up a full half acre at one gulp a few years 
ago, and where the slide took jilace the water 
is apparently as deep as ever. 

In the extreme western edge of Ionia county 
there is a little lake of about three acres in 
area : it is without any visible feeders or out- 
let. It is surrounded by woods on the high 
land, while its margin is grown up to shrubs 
and flags and grasses peculiar to the ordinary 
swamp. 

This is another of these mysterious water 
holes, termed bottomless, one party having 
sounded 130 feet without finding bottom. The 
water is red and unfit to drink, and millions 
of minute particles of vegetable matter are 
held in suspension and are in motion, as if 
stirred by force of an undercurrent or boiling 
sjirings. 

The only fish are big-mouthed bass and 
bullheads. I-'or all that the water seems to be 
so swampy in character it does not detract 
from the flavor of the fish, probably owing to 
. the fact of its being of better quality in its 
lower depths. 

Nagley's lake, in Kent county, is formed 
like a great horseshoe and is about seven miles 
in circumference. It has been sounded in one 
place and showed a depth of 250 feet. It has 
but one insignificant feeder and the natural 
evaporation must be considerable, and yet it 
has an outlet which flows water sufficient for 
power to drive a sawmill and gristmill, prov- 
ing that it is fed by heavy flowing springs 
that man has never seen. The water is clear 
blue and cold, and the bottom is hard marl 
lime. — New York Sun.. 



Its size considered, P)elgium is the great- 
est horse-breeding country in the world. It 
has an estimated equine population of 300,- 
000 on an area about equal to Maryland. 



HEIGHT OF MOUNT RAINIER. 



One of the officials of the geological sur- 
vey ascended Mount Rainier this summer for 
the purpose of making calculations of the 
height of the mountain, a matter which has 
never been definitely settled, and about 
which there is a decided disagreement. The 
geological survey at one time made a cal- 
culation of the iicight of the mountain upon 
observations made from a base line laid out 
in Pierce county. By mathematical calcu- 
lations based upon these observations it was 
determined that the height of the mountain 
was 14,522 feet, making it the highest peak 
in the United States outside of Alaska. 

This was accepted as the official figure of 
the height of the mountain for several years. 
Then a professor of Stanford University 
made an ascent of the mountain, and by 
barometric observations determined that the 
height was only 14,363 feet, and, therefore, 
that it was exceeded in height by Mount 
U'hitney, in California, and by Mount Mas- 
sive, in Colorado, Mount Whitney being 
the highest. Rejecting its own figures, 
based upon observations from a base line 
and mathematical calculations, the geo- 
grapliical survey accepted the result of 
barometic observations of an unofficial ob- 
server as correct and has used them there- 
after. 

The present series of observations at least 
will be official and will bear rather more 
weight than those which have latterly been 
used. The question whether or not Alount 
Rainier is the highest peak in the United 
Slates is not of very large importance, but 
has some sentimental interest. \\'hetlier or 
not another mountain is higher, there is no 
question that Rainier, showing its full 
lieigjit, as it does from the water level to the 
summit, and having near it no other peaks 
which approach it in height, is the grandest 
mountain that this continent can show. — Se- 
attle Post-Intelligencer. 



16,000,000 SCHOOL CHILDREN. 



Demand the union label on all purchases. 



This is a country of equal opportunities, 
and one of the greatest opportunities that it 
ofl'crs is that of education. Education smooths 
the way for future success by preparing the, 
individual for efficient service. The advances 
in education during the past few decades have 
been remarkable in quality and in quantity. A 
consideration of educational statistics for the 
past score of years will substantiate this state- 
ment as far as measurable progress is con- 
cerned. Twenty years ago the number of 
school teachers in the I'uited States was 272,- 
000, and the number of pupils in the .schools 
was close to 8,000,000. An enormous increase 
characterizes the current figures. More than 
half a million teachers of both sexes are now 
engaged in instructing 16,000,000 scholars. In 
other words, the magnitude of the .American 
school system is demonstrated by the state- 
ment that it has more than doubled in less than 
a quarter of a century. The educational bill 
of the L'uited States now reaches the round 
annual sum of $350,000,000, as against the ap- 
proximate sum of $125,000,000 in 1888. It is 
interesting to learn that Philadelphia will have 
nearly as many pupils in its .schools ne.xt week 
as there were teachers in all the States and 
Territories two decades ago. — Philadelphia 
Telegraph. 



There are 224 gallons in a ton of water. 
The ])roduction of salt in Turkey is a 
Government monopoly. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLAirORII. 

FuUowing is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the .Ainerican Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalizntion of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted into 
law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful play grounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interest for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of Lhiited States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 

INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

CContimiOft frnm Y'Ape 5.) 

PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

.S.\N KR.A.NCISCO, Ciil.. 44-4C East St. 
Branches: 

VANCOUVER, B. C. lL'2 Alexander St.. P. O. Box 
1365. 

TACOMA. Wasti., 221S North 30th St. 

.SE.A.TTI.E, W^ash., 1312 We.stern .^^ve., P. O. Box 65. 

PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., 114 Quincy St., P. O. 
Box 48. 

ARKUKEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND. Ore.. 51 Union Ave. 

EUREKA. Cal.. 227 First St.. P. O. Box 327. 

SAN PEDRO. Cal.. P. O. Box 67. 

HONOI-UI.U. II. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters; 
SAN ERANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408V. Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, r:il.. .'.1 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE. Wash., 209-210 Powell Building. P. O. 
Box l.'?35. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
.\BKHIiEI':N. W:ish., P. O. Box :i4. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

geor(;etown. ^^■.^sh. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. W.ish , P. O. Box n. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
I.ORIXa, Ala-ska 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG. Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEA.TTLE Wash.. 1312 Western Ave, P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

BAY AND RIVER STEAM BOATM EN'S UNION OF 
CALIFORNIA. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 51 Steuart St. 

Branch: 
SACRAMENTO. Cal., 200 M St. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can lie prncLirod by seamen at 
any of the nbove-meiitioned pl:ieps: 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

29 ERSKINE STREET. SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



LABOR'S POLITICAL OPPORTUNITY. 



In the recent upheaval at the polls, both 
in the primaries and in the elections, the 
workers and the people generally have de- 
monstrated equally their disgust and their 
power by sending into political oblivion 
many Congressmen and legislators who 
have been hostile and indifferent to the 
rights of labor — to the rights and interests 
of the people. Consult the daily press, and 
not a reference is to be found to the potent 
influence in tliis result of the workers en- 
gaged in the organized labor movement of 
our countr}'. Not one of the gentlemen en- 
gaged in making explanations the day after, 
and then for the week after, had a single 
word to say about the "labor vote" escaping 
them. None of them had ever expected it 
to throw them ; only a few "bad labor lead- 
ers" had been showing disgruntlement. 
Well, 'tis true, the commanding ofificers of 
many a fort blown up had not known of the 
mine that was being bored underneath them, 
and this is equally true of the commanding 
officers of a political stronghold. 

In past campaigns, labor entered into the 
open arena of political battle and drew all 
the concentrated opposition fire upon its 
ranks. Though victory was secured here 
and there, its manifest results were not such 
as to bring the greatest gratification, except 
that the principles and rights for which the 
toilers were contending were pressed upon 
the attention of friends and opponents alike. 
Organized labor has learned the lesson that, 
for a time at least, silent yet constant and 
persistent effort would bring its best 
achievement, so we find in the primaries and 
in the elections of the recent past that in 
not one district in which the toilers have 
made any serious efforts have they been 
disappointed in the results. 

The abuse of the writ of injunction, by 
which men have been shorn of the rights 
and liberties guaranteed by the constitu- 
tions of our coimtry and of our States; the 
denial of equality before the law of the 
working peojjle with all other citizens; the 
attempt, by judicial invasion, to deprive 
law-al)iding and liberty-loving citizens of 
the rights to which they are constitutionally 
and inherently entitled; the judicial inter- 
pretation of laws governing corporations 
and trusts so that they shall apply to the 
voluntary organizations of workers instead 
of protecting their personal rights and in- 
terests; the refusal to extend the beneficent 
features of the eight-hour law ; failure to 
enact laws for the protection of the lives 
and limbs of the workers, or to enact com- 
pensation laws for injury or death; the 
Cannonization of Congressional legislation 
by packing committees and smothering all 
legislation of a reformatory or progressive 
character ; the whole scheme of legislation 
in furtherance of vested interests — all this 
aroused the workers who have made com- 
mon cause with the people to the results 
already achieved and those yet to be 
achieved November 8, 1910. 

The common people of this country, 
when once aroused to the true situation of 
injustice and danger, are with the union 
people, and the unions have been, and pro- 
pose to be, vigorously and persistently 
demonstrating that this Government was 
primarily meant for the rights of men. The 
people are not against property, but when 
the question is presented concisely to them 
to choose between the rights of property 



and the rights of man they will insist upon 
the man before the dollar. Corporate in- 
terests and big politicians will yet learn 
that, once the masses awake to the meaning 
of despotic legislation, reckless injunctions 
and the various other manifestations of the 
partisans of capital, and of the conflict be- 
tween "the interests" and free labor and a 
free people, they can not run this republic 
to perdition. 

The workers stand for equality before the 
law, asking no special privileges for them- 
selves and insisting that no special privi- 
leges shall be accorded to others, and 
especially such special privileges as militate 
against the rights and interests of the 
masses. 

Party loyalty ceases to have the potent 
influence it once had upon the people of 
our country. They are demanding and in- 
sisting upon reformatory and progressive 
legislation for justice and for right; they 
want the initiative, the referendum and the 
recall, and real "government of the people, 
for the people, by the people." It was the 
organized labor movement that first de- 
clared for these political demands, as it de- 
manded free schools, free text-books and 
compulsory education, the secret ballot, the 
direct nomination and election of United 
States Senators, and an elective rather than 
an appointive judiciary — indeed, the direct 
election of all the officers and representa- 
tives of Government, both great and small, 
and their direct accountability to the people. 

The wage-workers will divest themselves 
of loyalty to a political party once they have 
come to understand that the party has 
ceased its loyalty to them. The lo3^alty of 
the workers is due to themselves first of all, 
because their interests are fundamental in 
society. Politicians, in endeavoring to ex- 
plain their recent undoing, seem to labor 
under the impression that the workers were 
not thinking for themselves. Indeed they 
were, and they have acted, or rather they 
are just beginning to act. 

The American Federation of Labor has 
declared it most firmly and unequivocally 
favors the use of the ballot by the trades 
unionists and workingmen regardless of 
party; that we should elect men from our 
own ranks to make new laws and adminis- 
ter them along the lines laid down in labor's 
legislative demands, and- at the same time 
secure an impartial judiciary that will not 
govern us by arbitrary injunctions or act 
as the pliant tools of corporate wealth ; that 
as our efforts are centered against all forms 
of industrial slavery and economic wrong, 
the workers must direct their utmost efforts 
to remove all forms of political servitude 
and party slavery. The American labor 
movement is not partisan to a political 
party. It is partisan to a principle, the 
principle of equal rights and human free- 
dom. 

Representatives in Congress and legisla- 
tures who are of such plastic mold and who 
neither dare to do nor dare to openly deny 
should be kept home. 

Wherever the opportunity presents itself, 
men from the ranks of labor who possess 
honesty, ability and faithfulness to the 
cause of the common people should be sent 
to Congress and to the State legislatures. 

The covert insinuations or open declara- 
tions of opposition to the election of "Saint 
Cannon" to the speakership are insufficient 
to entitle candidates to the support of the 
toiling masses. Labor must have direct, 



open and avowed affirmative pledges, based 
upon past declarations and actions, to en- 
title candidates to labor's co-bperation and 
support. Too long have the toilers vainly 
pleaded and urged for a square deal. 

All along the line the beginning of an 
upheaval is manifest. The people are tired 
of the old policy of catering to "the inter- 
ests" an neglecting and violating the rights 
of the masses. 

Do not let the interests cajole or threaten 
the toilers with dire results which may fol- 
low their rightful independent course. Our 
organized labor movement has demon- 
strated and will demonstrate more ef- 
fectively than ever that we are capable of 
protecting and advancing our rights upon 
the industrial field. 

A good pull, a long pull and a pull al- 
together, to stand by our friends and defeat 
our enemies at the coming elections, will be 
the most effective means of administering a 
rebuke to those who have proven hostile 
and indifferent to the cause of labor, the 
cause of right, justice and humanity. — 
American Federationist. 



RECOVERY OF RUSSIA. 



Our Consul-Gencral at Moscow, John H. 
Snodgrass, in his annual report states that 
the foreign trade of European Russia in 
1909 aggregated- $1,109,732,815, the highest 
level in the history of the country, the total 
in 1908 being $875,089,545. The exports 
amounted to $703,682,095 and the imports to 
$406,550,720, the former exceeding the lat- 
ter by $297,631,375. He point-s out that this 
immense gain in trade was due principally 
to the growth of grain exports, stimulated 
by the satisfactory crops throughout the 
Empire, as well as by the high prices abroad 
for food supplies. 

The war with Japan, in spite of the colos- 
sal loss in men and money involved, hardly 
affected Russian prosperity in any degree. 
The recovery was immediate and vigorous. 
In a very few months the Government reve- 
nues were greater than ever before. In fact 
it was made plain that the struggle in the 
Far East had touched the people at large in 
the Czar's vast dominions as little as the war 
between Japan and China had the remote 
parts of the Middle Kingdom. 

It is curious to contrast the eft'ect of the 
Russo-Japanese War with that of the Anglo- 
Boer War. In spite of her wealth England 
still suffers from conditions directly trace- 
able to the South African bad business, in 
which 40,000 farmers held up the Empire. 
Kruger kept his word about staggering hu- 
manity. The victorious Japanese did not 
succeed in staggering Russia except for a 
brief period of time. 

The question arises : Will she be content 
not to use the strength that grows greater 
every day, and strive to win back in Asia 
the prestige that she lost through incompe- 
tence and blundering? — New York Evening 
Sun. 



There arrived in Trinidad ports during the 
year 1909-10, 2,840 vessels, an excess over the 
previous year of 410; 56 were American ves- 
sels, with a tonnage of 48,543. In 1909-10, 
240 steamers took 45.859 tons of coal here, 
about three times the amount taken in 1907-8. 



The highest inliabited place in the world 
is the P.uddhist monastery of Ilaine, Thil)ct, 
which is about 17,000 feet above sea level. 



l2 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



I 



News from Abroad. 



King Cliulalonkorn of Siani died at 
Bangkok on October 22, following an 
illness of only a few days. 

Prince Francis Joseph Leopold 
Frederick of Teck, brother of Queen 
Mary of England, died at London on 
October 22. 

The Spanish Government has au- 
thorized its Minister at Lisbon to en- 
ter into relations with the provisional 
Government. 

It is reported that Great Britain 
has suggested to other nations that 
they recognize the Portuguese Rcpub 
lie simultaneously. 

The Chinese Imperial Senate, not 
three weeks old, has voted to memo 
rialize the Throne for the early open- 
ing of a general Parliament. 

In spite of the Russo-Japanese 
agreement commercial men in the 
Far East are alarmed at the activity 
of Japan in Manchuria. 

As the results of borings in the 
district of Talcahuano, Chile, large 
coal beds have been discovered. It is 
estimated that the beds will yield 
150,000,000 tons. 

The German Minister of War, after 
the successful reconnoitering experi- 
ments on October 18 by three aero- 
planes, has decided to purchase a 
number of aeroplanes for military 
purposes. 

An official note from Paris on Oc- 
tober 20 confirms the announcement 
that an agreement has been reached 
between Turkey and France for the 
flotation of a $.10,000,000 loan in 
Paris. 

Although no date has yet been 
fixed for the launch of Britain's first 
naval airship, there is every reason to 
believe that she will emerge from her 
huge shed at Barrow some time next 
month. 

The official reports on the cholera 
situation in Italy indicate an increase 
in the spread of the disease. During 
October 19 thirty-seven new cases de- 
veloped. Seventeen deaths occurrevl 
during the same period. 

The cost of living in Havre. France, 
has considerably increased in the last 
ten years, and is constantly the sub- 
ject of French comment and contin- 
ual complaint on the part of those 
whose salaries remain unchanged. 

The Chilean Government has de- 
cided to postpone until December 30 
the time for receipt of bids for the 
construction of two battleships of 
24,000 tons. American and German 
shipbuilding interests had requested 
the postponement. 

The Victorian (Australia) Premier, 
referring to a statement made at a 
deputation that there was sweating of 
women in the white work trade, said 
he believed there was sweating, and 
asked to be supplied with definite 
particulars. 

The Spanish Government is taking 
steps to prevent the removal to the 
United States of the famous stair- 
case in the ancient Casa de Miranda 
at Burgos. The staircase is a beauti- 
ful example of rennaissance architec- 
ture. It is announced that J. Pier- 
pont Morgan has purchased it. 

Another chapter was added to the 
history of aviation on October 16, 
when the French dirigible balloon 
Clement-Bayard made the voyage 
from Compiegne to London in the re- 
markable time of six hours, a journey 
requiring seven hours by the fastest 
express trains and boats. 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 




Established 1888. 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cat. 

Oldest School on Pacific Coast. Largest 
and best equipped private Nautical School In 
the United States. Graduates prepared for the 
American and British Merchant Marine exam- 
inations. Warrant ofRcers of the United States 
Navy prepared for examination for commis- 
sion officers. Special course for cadets enter- 1 
ing the United States Naval Academy. 

Personal Instruction by Captain Henry Tay- 
lor. M. A., Compass Adjuster, Certified In- 
structor, Passed Master, Proctor In Admiralty, 
Counselor at Law and competent to give legal 
advice on all matters, including Naturalization. 

WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



WHOLESALE Sole Agents for RETAIL 

The McCormack System of Fine Tailoring 

McCORMACK BROS. 

Importers, Jobbers and Retailers 

MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS, CAPS, BOOTS AND SHOES 
TRUNKS, VALISES AND NOTIONS 



812-814 FIRST AVENUE. Opp. Colman Block 



SEATTLE, Wash. 



MARSHALUS 
Navigation School 



NEVER HAD A FAILURE 



11 COLMAN DOCK 



SEATTLE 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT OUT- 
FITTERS. 
615-617 First Ave., Opp. Totem Pole, 
SEATTLE. WASH. 



Hpridquartcrs For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 



At 



WESTERMAN & SCHERMER 

220 and 222 First Avenue, South 
Branch Store - - 1335 Third Avenue 

SEATTLE, W.-XSIL 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St., 

Seattle, Wash. 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

Undertakers 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to. 
Telephone No. 13. 




SEATTLE NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

Candidates for Mas- 
ters' and Mates' Ocean 
or Coast Licenses of 
all Grades are In- 
structed In the Prac- 
tice and Theory of 
Navigation in all Its 
Branches, and In the 
Arithmetic of Navi- 
gation In a Clear and Intelligent Manner 
By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College: 
Ocean Steamship Master. Unlimited- 
Pueet Sound and Alaska Pilot: Author of 
"Self Instructor In Navigation." Chart 
and Sextant Practice, etc. 

MARITIME BLDG. (Fifth Floor), 
911 Western Avenue. 
Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 
Successful Compass Adjuster. Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 



Christoffersen. A. H. 
C'oiTians. Jos. 
Chudolen. G. 
Dahl, Emil 
Darker. Tlios. 
Pedriksen. K. 
iJrennan. A. E. 
RKvood. Alf. 
Ellcfsen, Otto 
Krikson. Allan 
Eskilleii. N. 
Folstad. K. M. 
FranzcU, A. 
Fredrikscn, B. J. 
(iarh.-rs, G. 
Glioma r. C. 
Gromlnhl. H. 
Grundback. .1. 
Hansen, I-ewls 
Hansi-n. Ernest 
Hansen, Ole 
Hansen. Hans P. 
Haug, H. H. 
Hahrdank, L. 
Ha.lis. H. 
Hekkola, M. 
Hewitt, P. 
lfplli."en, H. 
Ingalls. W. I, 
Ingelirekin. Olaf 
Isakscn, Krist 
Isakscn, Alf. 
.Jacfihson, Toi'gils 
.lainbsen. Adolf 
.laioljsen. Knut 
Janson, Trygve 
Jensen, Hans 
Johnson, J. A. 
Johnson, Ingoman 
Johnston, P. 
Johanson, J. H. 
Jnhansen, Chr. 
Johansen, Ludvig 
Johan.scn, O. K. 
Kalnow. A. 
Kalnlng. J. 
Kenny. John 
Kesher. Karl 
Koop, J. T. D. 
Kristoffersen. Alf. 
Kylander, Fred 
Lambert. Ed. 
Lahtonen, P. 
Larsen, L. 
Leahy, W. 
I.fhtonen, W. 



Lillie, F. P. 
Llndberg, Oscar 
Lorin. K. 
Lundqulst, J. 
Lunder. B. 
Martinsen, A. N. 
Mathewson. N. 
Mattson, F. 
Miller. G. A. 
Morton, P. 
Moore, W. 
McCarthy, W. 
Murphy, Geo. 
Muhrer. M. 
Ness, Carl 
Nielsen, W. 
Nielsen, C. -126 
Norman, Jack 
Newman, Jacob 
Olsen. Ernest -1120 
Olsen, H. J. 
Olsen, Oskar 
Paul, P. J. 
Pedersen. Olaf 
Persson, Johan 
Petterson, J. O. 
Petterson, MIer 
Peter